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Digital Photo Frames for refrigirators??



 
 
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  #21  
Old December 22nd 08, 09:24 PM posted to rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.digital.point+shoot,rec.photo.digital.slr-systems
mcdonaldREMOVE TO ACTUALLY REACH [email protected]
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Posts: 243
Default Digital Photo Frames for refrigirators??




We have an employee with some of those fancy stainless steel
appliances. She says magnets don't stick.
Then it's not stainless steel.


Some grades of stainless steel aren't magnetic. Depends on how much
nickel is in it, I gather.


No, how much chromium. Low chromium makes it magnetic.


Yes, you're right there is type of stainless called "Austenitic" that,
in the right conditions, is non magnetic. Slap it with a hammer (or
other tooling) and it becomes quite attracted to magnets, however.


The vast majority of stainless steels are nonmagnetic ("300 series"
such as 304 or 316) as opposed to magnetic ones ("400 series".

By nonmagnetic I mean nonFERROmagnetic ... they are all strongly
paramagnetic.

Doug McDonald
  #22  
Old December 22nd 08, 09:58 PM posted to rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.digital.point+shoot,rec.photo.digital.slr-systems
ASAAR
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Default Digital Photo Frames for refrigirators??

On Mon, 22 Dec 2008 13:59:47 -0500, Alan Browne, who is determined
to show that he knows all of the answers, wrote:

Then it's not stainless steel.


Some grades of stainless steel aren't magnetic. Depends on how much
nickel is in it, I gather.


Yes, you're right there is type of stainless called "Austenitic" that,
in the right conditions, is non magnetic. Slap it with a hammer (or
other tooling) and it becomes quite attracted to magnets, however.


I've an old KitchenAid pot that's been knocked around and banged
up for years. "Stainless Steel" is stamped on the bottom and
there's no noticeable attraction by strong magnets. Did you just
google "Stainless Steel" and discover the word "Austenitic"?

In general, the higher the proportion of chromium, the stronger the
corrosion resistance of the steel. In addition to chromium, other
metals are added to give the steel particular properties such as
strength and malleability. Specifically nickel is used to strengthen
the oxide layer.

As for whether they are magnetic, the answer is that it depends.
There are several families of stainless steels with different physical
properties. A basic stainless steel has a 'ferritic' structure and is
magnetic. These are formed from the addition of chromium and
can be hardened through the addition of carbon (making them
'martensitic') and are often used in cutlery. However, the most
common stainless steels are 'austenitic' - these have a higher
chromium content and nickel is also added. It is the nickel which
modifies the physical structure of the steel and makes it non-magnetic.

So the answer is yes, the magnetic properties of stainless steel are
very dependent on the elements added into the alloy, and specifically
the addition of nickel can change the structure from magnetic to non-magnetic.


http://www.physlink.com/Education/AskExperts/ae546.cfm


If you have non-magnetic stainless steel and you "Slap it with a
hammer", does that knock the nickel out of the steel, leaving a
powdery residue? Is this the famous "plugged nickel" that is used
to measure your theories' values? How hard does a pot have to be
slapped to change the steel's structure and make it non-magnetic?
Can it be done easily in a kitchen or is a machine shop's equipment
sufficient? Reheating the pot to a very high temperature will
return it to its non-magnetic state. Isn't the internet great?

  #23  
Old December 22nd 08, 10:08 PM posted to rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.digital.point+shoot,rec.photo.digital.slr-systems
John Navas[_2_]
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Default Digital Photo Frames for refrigirators??

On Mon, 22 Dec 2008 14:24:15 -0600, "mcdonaldREMOVE TO ACTUALLY REACH
wrote in :

We have an employee with some of those fancy stainless steel
appliances. She says magnets don't stick.
Then it's not stainless steel.

Some grades of stainless steel aren't magnetic. Depends on how much
nickel is in it, I gather.


No, how much chromium. Low chromium makes it magnetic.


No, nickel. See
http://www.physlink.com/Education/AskExperts/ae546.cfm

Question

Is stainless steel magnetic? Does it depend on the amount of
chromium, or nickel alloy?

Asked by: James McGuigan

Answer

Stainless steels are a very broad group of metals. The name was
adopted as a generic term for steel alloys with a minimum of 10.5%
chromium. The chromium gives the steel its 'stainless' properties -
essentially corrosion resistance. On the surface of the metal, a very
thin chromium-rich oxide layer is formed which is inert - i.e. it
prevents the steel from rusting. The advantage of stainless steels
over plated steels is that, if scratched or damaged, the steel will
'self-repair' as a new oxide layer is formed. In plated steels,
scratches in the plate will often lead to corrosion of the steel
underneath.

In general, the higher the proportion of chromium, the stronger the
corrosion resistance of the steel. In addition to chromium, other
metals are added to give the steel particular properties such as
strength and malleability. Specifically nickel is used to strengthen
the oxide layer.

As for whether they are magnetic, the answer is that it depends.
There are several families of stainless steels with different
physical properties. A basic stainless steel has a 'ferritic'
structure and is magnetic. These are formed from the addition of
chromium and can be hardened through the addition of carbon (making
them 'martensitic') and are often used in cutlery. However, the most
common stainless steels are 'austenitic' - these have a higher
chromium content and nickel is also added. IT IS THE NICKEL WHICH
MODIFIES THE PHYSICAL STRUCTURE OF THE STEEL AND MAKES IT
NON-MAGNETIC. [emphasis added]

So the answer is yes, the magnetic properties of stainless steel are
very dependent on the elements added into the alloy, and specifically
the addition of nickel can change the structure from magnetic to
non-magnetic.

The following company website has a useful high-level definition of
the broad stainless steel categories.
http://www.parkrow.org/stainless_steel.htm

Answered by: Jules Seeley, M.S., Physics graduate; Strategy
Consultant, London.

--
Best regards,
John
Panasonic DMC-FZ8, DMC-FZ20, and several others
  #24  
Old December 22nd 08, 10:12 PM posted to rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.digital.point+shoot,rec.photo.digital.slr-systems
ASAAR
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Default Digital Photo Frames for refrigirators??

On Mon, 22 Dec 2008 14:24:15 -0600, "mcdonaldREMOVE TO ACTUALLY
REACH wrote:

Some grades of stainless steel aren't magnetic. Depends on how much
nickel is in it, I gather.


No, how much chromium. Low chromium makes it magnetic.


No, back atcha! Unlike humans, steel that's got the hots is
non-magnetic. Nickel makes the non-magnetic state stable at low
temperatures. This is shown in the quote below. If chromium also
has this property, it's probably less effective than nickel. The
same web page notes that to increase the corrosion resistance of
steel, chromium is added.

At room temperature Mild Steel is magnetic - the atoms are arranged
to form a structure that is predominantly ferrite. Ferrite is magnetic.
Once steel is heated to above 730°C the atoms will tend to rearrange
into a phase called Austenite. Austenite is non-magnetic. So very hot
steel is not magnetic….who cares!

An interesting fact is that some alloy additions will encourage Austenite
to be stable at room temperature, the result being a steel which is
non-magnetic at room temperature. One such alloy is Nickel. The 300
series of stainless steels contain sufficient Nickel to render them
non-magnetic. As 316/L & 304/L are the most common stainless steel
grades used, they are the grades that most people are familiar with.
All of the stainless steels from the 300 series are non-magnetic. This has
resulted in the misconception that all stainless steels are non-magnetic.
But the fact remains that stainless steels from the other series such as
200, 400, PH, duplex etc have higher percentages of ferrite and are
therefore magnetic. Some of these “magnetic” stainless steels have
superior strength and corrosion resistance than those of the 300 series.


http://www.supremesteel.co.nz/articl...l_magnetic.php

  #25  
Old December 22nd 08, 11:28 PM posted to rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.digital.point+shoot,rec.photo.digital.slr-systems
John A.
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Posts: 98
Default Digital Photo Frames for refrigirators??

On Mon, 22 Dec 2008 16:12:14 -0500, ASAAR wrote:

On Mon, 22 Dec 2008 14:24:15 -0600, "mcdonaldREMOVE TO ACTUALLY
REACH wrote:

Some grades of stainless steel aren't magnetic. Depends on how much
nickel is in it, I gather.


No, how much chromium. Low chromium makes it magnetic.


No, back atcha! Unlike humans, steel that's got the hots is
non-magnetic. Nickel makes the non-magnetic state stable at low
temperatures. This is shown in the quote below. If chromium also
has this property, it's probably less effective than nickel. The
same web page notes that to increase the corrosion resistance of
steel, chromium is added.


Gosh! With all this metallurgical discussion in a photography group
you'd think the P&S guy would jump in to chastise us "resident-trolls"
for our off-topic posts.
  #26  
Old December 22nd 08, 11:51 PM posted to rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.digital.point+shoot,rec.photo.digital.slr-systems
Alan Browne
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Posts: 12,650
Default Digital Photo Frames for refrigirators??

John A. wrote:
On Mon, 22 Dec 2008 16:12:14 -0500, ASAAR wrote:

On Mon, 22 Dec 2008 14:24:15 -0600, "mcdonaldREMOVE TO ACTUALLY
REACH wrote:

Some grades of stainless steel aren't magnetic. Depends on how much
nickel is in it, I gather.
No, how much chromium. Low chromium makes it magnetic.

No, back atcha! Unlike humans, steel that's got the hots is
non-magnetic. Nickel makes the non-magnetic state stable at low
temperatures. This is shown in the quote below. If chromium also
has this property, it's probably less effective than nickel. The
same web page notes that to increase the corrosion resistance of
steel, chromium is added.


Gosh! With all this metallurgical discussion in a photography group
you'd think the P&S guy would jump in to chastise us "resident-trolls"
for our off-topic posts.


At least RichA doesn't have an excuse for an anti-plastic rant.

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-- r.p.d.slr-systems: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpdslrsysur.htm
-- [SI] gallery & rulz: http://www.pbase.com/shootin
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  #27  
Old December 23rd 08, 01:51 AM posted to rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.digital.point+shoot,rec.photo.digital.slr-systems
Ron Hunter
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Posts: 4,064
Default Digital Photo Frames for refrigirators??

John A. wrote:
On Sun, 21 Dec 2008 20:40:47 -0700, "Bob Hatch"
wrote:

"John Navas" wrote in message

On 21 Dec 2008 17:42:56 GMT, Allodoxaphobia
wrote in :

On Sun, 21 Dec 2008 09:49:19 -0700, Bob Hatch wrote:
"Neil Jones" wrote in
I am looking for Digital Photo Frames (5x7) that can be put on the
refrigerator in the kitchen. The ony ones that I found were too
small or integrated into the refrigerator.

Could you please let me know if anyone is aware of this type of
frames?
Buy the frame you want, then go to Wal-Mart or any crafts store and
buy a roll of adhesive backed magnetic tape. Apply the tape to the
back of the frame, and put it on the fridge door.
Checking first to see the your refrigerator is not made from
aluminum or plastic....

Elsewise: Plan B.
Velcro.

I use commercial grade Velcro to hang pictures, up to 16x20 with small
frame, on the walls of my motor home. Some have been there for 50,000 miles
over all kinds of roads.

I use the magnetic tape to attach carpet to the outside steps of the motor
home. I do add hot glue to the tape, but I leave the carpets on the steps
when driving. I've never lost one. They wear out in about 2 years, and I
remove the magnetic tape and put them on the back of new carpet.

Either would work, but the magnetic tape will be easy to take down and clean
the fridge door, it the door is a metal that will hold the magnet. If you're
worried about the adhesive giving way, just tack the magnet down with hot
glue or a bit of gorilla glue.


We have an employee with some of those fancy stainless steel
appliances. She says magnets don't stick.


If a magnet doesn't stick to it, then it is NOT really stainless steel.
More likely brushed aluminum.
  #29  
Old December 23rd 08, 02:18 AM posted to rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.digital.point+shoot,rec.photo.digital.slr-systems
ASAAR
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Posts: 6,057
Default Digital Photo Frames for refrigirators??

On Mon, 22 Dec 2008 18:51:04 -0600, Ron Hunter wrote:

We have an employee with some of those fancy stainless steel
appliances. She says magnets don't stick.


If a magnet doesn't stick to it, then it is NOT really stainless steel.
More likely brushed aluminum.


This might be one of the areas where your wife could teach you a
thing or two. Or not. There are many types of stainless steel
cookware, and many of them don't work on induction ranges.

  #30  
Old December 23rd 08, 02:22 AM posted to rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.digital.point+shoot,rec.photo.digital.slr-systems
Alan Browne
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Posts: 12,650
Default Digital Photo Frames for refrigirators??

Ron Hunter wrote:
John A. wrote:


We have an employee with some of those fancy stainless steel
appliances. She says magnets don't stick.


If a magnet doesn't stick to it, then it is NOT really stainless steel.
More likely brushed aluminum.


.... will somebody...


--
-- r.p.e.35mm user resource: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
-- r.p.d.slr-systems: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpdslrsysur.htm
-- [SI] gallery & rulz: http://www.pbase.com/shootin
-- e-meil: Remove FreeLunch.
-- usenet posts from gmail.com and googlemail.com are filtered out.
 




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