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Grainy skye?



 
 
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  #11  
Old October 14th 05, 03:37 PM
MXP
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Default Grainy skye?


"Lorem Ipsum" skrev i en meddelelse
...
"MXP" wrote in message
...
I have worked a little with Gigabitfilm and here the grains in the skye
is quite visible. On other areas the film grains are very small (4000 dpi
scan).


Is your scanner a _true_ 4000spi scanner? Even the Nikon (35mm) 4000spi
scanner gives way to noise at high resolution.


I am very happy with my scanner. It is a Coolscan 9000 and I use 8x multi
sample
to reduce noise from the scanner CCD. It gives very clean scan. The dark
areas are
very clean. It is no compare to the Epson 3200 flatbed i used before. It was
pure
waste of time.
I think it will help a lot if I don't apply USM to the skye. I think I
should handle the
whole USM in Photoshop. Now I also apply a little USM during the
scan...using the
Nikon scanner software.

Max


  #12  
Old October 14th 05, 07:05 PM
MXP
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Default Grainy skye?


"M Liddell" skrev i en meddelelse
oups.com...
I've never taken photographs on the Isle of Skye but I don't see why
the sky should be any more grainy there compared to elsewhere.

In fact many of the frames I have just scanned are from the Scottish island
Skye. A programmed spelling error.......


If you want finer grain don't scan your b&w film. It's that simple.


It is only in the sky I have some problems......and now I will try out
not using USM in the sky.



MXP wrote:
Why does the skye always look grainy on film?
Even on high resolution BW film.......

Is it the film which react this way......or does the skye just look like
that?

Max




  #13  
Old October 15th 05, 01:37 AM
Lorem Ipsum
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Default Grainy skye?

"MXP" wrote:

I use a Coolscan 9000 in 4000 dpi mode.[...]

Gigabitfilm has so much information that I could use more than 4000 dpi.


Help me understand: How much of the lens resolution are you really
capturing? It seems unlikely that you get enough to justify 4000spi, and I
even question whether the Coolscan can do better than 1600spi in reality.


  #14  
Old October 15th 05, 05:35 PM
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Default Grainy skye?


"MXP" wrote in message
...
Why does the skye always look grainy on film?
Even on high resolution BW film.......

Not Tech-Pan.


  #15  
Old October 15th 05, 05:37 PM
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Default Grainy skye?

While we're on the "sky" subject. What's the best filter for darkening the
sky? I've used a red filter, but that's too costly for exposure. Does
anyone have any suggestions?
Thanks


  #16  
Old October 16th 05, 01:01 AM
Peter Irwin
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Default Grainy skye?

wrote:
While we're on the "sky" subject. What's the best filter for darkening the
sky? I've used a red filter, but that's too costly for exposure. Does
anyone have any suggestions?
Thanks


A polarizer will often darken skies about as much as a #25 red,
will have a filter factor of about 3, and will not give you
the false colour rendition of a red filter.

The sky darkening effect of a filter which cuts the blue out
depends on how much blue and ultraviolet is in the sky colour.

I personally don't really like the red filter most of the
time because it tends to make yellows and greens look way
too dark. The Wratten G-#15 filter is called "deep yellow",
but I'd call it nearly orange. It will darken blue skies
quite a bit while leaving the yellows and greens looking
right. Filter factor is about 2.5 for most modern panchromatic
films.

Generally a Wratten K2-#8 will give you skies that look about
the same shade as they do to the eye. It also usually gives
the most natural colour rendition, though reds are sometimes
a little light by my judgment. The filter factor is generally
less than 2 with modern panchromatic films. With TMX the K2
filter cuts only about half a stop.

The panchromatic green Wratten X1-#11, has about the same
effect on the sky as the yellow K2-#8 and it also darkens
reds a bit. I tend to like the X1 when there is green foliage
in the scene because it comes out lighter. Filter factor is
about 4.

Hope this helps,

Peter.
--


  #17  
Old October 16th 05, 03:05 AM
Tony Polson
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Default Grainy skye?

wrote:

While we're on the "sky" subject. What's the best filter for darkening the
sky? I've used a red filter, but that's too costly for exposure. Does
anyone have any suggestions?



A pale yellow filter darkens it a little. A deep yellow filter
darkens it much more. An orange filter will probably give as much
darkening as you will ever need, and I agree that the red filter is
simply too extreme for most uses.

I use deep yellow or orange. The pale yellow is of no use to me
because, if I want to darken the sky, I don't want the effect to be so
subtle that no-one notices. I choose from deep yellow or orange
depending on how dramatic I want the darkening to appear.


  #18  
Old October 16th 05, 03:11 PM
MXP
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Default Grainy skye?


"Lorem Ipsum" skrev i en meddelelse
...
"MXP" wrote:

I use a Coolscan 9000 in 4000 dpi mode.[...]

Gigabitfilm has so much information that I could use more than 4000 dpi.


Help me understand: How much of the lens resolution are you really
capturing? It seems unlikely that you get enough to justify 4000spi, and I
even question whether the Coolscan can do better than 1600spi in reality.


Apart from the sky then everything looks very sharp and detailed when I scan
Gigabitfilm in 4000 dpi mode. But 4000 dpi reduces the max. resolution to
about
60 lp/mm. Gigabitfilm can do a bit more. It is the lens which limit the max.
resolution
you can get. So maybe I have 100 lp/mm in some of my pictures. I can see I
have
about 60 lp/mm in the scanned details. There are some details where you can
count
approx. how many lp/mm you have (e.g. written letters in signs far away
etc).
For scanning Velvia I find 4000 dpi optimal. It is very little you can get
out if it was
scanned with e.g. a 8000 dpi scanner from Imacon. I often use a microscope
to
check how much details I get out from the scans.

Max


  #19  
Old October 16th 05, 03:20 PM
MXP
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Default Grainy skye?

The Gigabitfilm is very unsensitive in the red area so +4 stops has to be
applied so it will be about +6 stops loss of light. I know this is true
because
I have many underexposed shots before I found out (it is written on the
film) and
I also checked with the person which has developed the Gigabitfilm
developer.
He suggested just to use a light yellow filter and then use larger
appertures than
normal to get most lp/mm down on the film.

skrev i en meddelelse
...
While we're on the "sky" subject. What's the best filter for darkening
the
sky? I've used a red filter, but that's too costly for exposure. Does
anyone have any suggestions?
Thanks




  #20  
Old October 16th 05, 03:21 PM
MXP
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Posts: n/a
Default Grainy skye?


skrev i en meddelelse
...

"MXP" wrote in message
...
Why does the skye always look grainy on film?
Even on high resolution BW film.......

Not Tech-Pan.


I have never tried Tech-Pan.
Is it easy to work with?

Max


 




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