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film storage - fridge or freezer?



 
 
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  #1  
Old April 1st 09, 03:33 PM posted to rec.photo.equipment.35mm
Beefy LaSleep
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 11
Default film storage - fridge or freezer?

I usually store in the fridge, but read about those that put film in
the freezer. OK for it? More suited to long term storage? I've not had
any problem with cold storage in the fridge part in the past, just
wondering.

Locally film (well, good film) is harder to find. I just mail ordered
some Velvia 100F, and being more rolls than I will shoot right away,
wondered about the cold storage options...
  #2  
Old April 1st 09, 05:30 PM posted to rec.photo.equipment.35mm
tconway
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Posts: 52
Default film storage - fridge or freezer?


"Beefy LaSleep" wrote in message
...
I usually store in the fridge, but read about those that put film in
the freezer. OK for it? More suited to long term storage? I've not had
any problem with cold storage in the fridge part in the past, just
wondering.

Locally film (well, good film) is harder to find. I just mail ordered
some Velvia 100F, and being more rolls than I will shoot right away,
wondered about the cold storage options...


I believe freezing it will keep it the longest (indefinitely); but the
fridge is also fine. The only concern I see is that to thaw it well enough
before use to keep it from becoming brittle and breaking.
I used to keep it in baggies to prevent condensation too.
tim


  #3  
Old April 1st 09, 09:57 PM posted to rec.photo.equipment.35mm
Alan Browne
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Posts: 12,640
Default film storage - fridge or freezer?

Beefy LaSleep wrote:
I usually store in the fridge, but read about those that put film in
the freezer. OK for it? More suited to long term storage? I've not had
any problem with cold storage in the fridge part in the past, just
wondering.

Locally film (well, good film) is harder to find. I just mail ordered
some Velvia 100F, and being more rolls than I will shoot right away,
wondered about the cold storage options...


Colder the better - I keep all of my film at -18C. I've shot Velvia
100/100F that was more than a year over date and the results were
subjectively as good as 'fresh' film.

--
-- r.p.e.35mm user resource: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
-- r.p.d.slr-systems: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpdslrsysur.htm
-- [SI] gallery & rulz: http://www.pbase.com/shootin
-- e-meil: Remove FreeLunch.
-- usenet posts from gmail.com and googlemail.com are filtered out.
  #4  
Old April 1st 09, 10:11 PM posted to rec.photo.equipment.35mm
Bill Graham
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,294
Default film storage - fridge or freezer?


"Beefy LaSleep" wrote in message
...
I usually store in the fridge, but read about those that put film in
the freezer. OK for it? More suited to long term storage? I've not had
any problem with cold storage in the fridge part in the past, just
wondering.

Locally film (well, good film) is harder to find. I just mail ordered
some Velvia 100F, and being more rolls than I will shoot right away,
wondered about the cold storage options...


I keep my slide film in the freezer, but I have been told by others on this
forum that it will deteriorate from the action of cosmic radiation even if
frozen, so I would hesitate to say it will last forever.....I suppose I
could store it inside a lead box inside my freezer, but I am in my 70's, so
such a thing would probably be overkill.......

  #5  
Old April 1st 09, 10:18 PM posted to rec.photo.equipment.35mm
Alan Browne
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12,640
Default film storage - fridge or freezer?

tconway wrote:
"Beefy LaSleep" wrote in message
...
I usually store in the fridge, but read about those that put film in
the freezer. OK for it? More suited to long term storage? I've not had
any problem with cold storage in the fridge part in the past, just
wondering.

Locally film (well, good film) is harder to find. I just mail ordered
some Velvia 100F, and being more rolls than I will shoot right away,
wondered about the cold storage options...


I believe freezing it will keep it the longest (indefinitely); but the


Film is already 'frozen' even at room temperature.

fridge is also fine. The only concern I see is that to thaw it well enough
before use to keep it from becoming brittle and breaking.


Film does not "thaw" (see above). It should be warmed to ambient before
unwrapping - to prevent condensation.

I shoot film from time to time to -20C and below. It is flexible enough
then - so brittle and breaking is not an issue. (What can be an issue
is static discharge as the film unwinds in the camera and the static
exposing the film).

I used to keep it in baggies to prevent condensation too.


Just leave it in the original packaging for a couple hours - no need for
baggies unless it has been opened.

--
-- r.p.e.35mm user resource: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
-- r.p.d.slr-systems: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpdslrsysur.htm
-- [SI] gallery & rulz: http://www.pbase.com/shootin
-- e-meil: Remove FreeLunch.
-- usenet posts from gmail.com and googlemail.com are filtered out.
  #6  
Old April 2nd 09, 12:14 AM posted to rec.photo.equipment.35mm
Stefan Patric[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 61
Default film storage - fridge or freezer?

On Wed, 01 Apr 2009 07:33:46 -0700, Beefy LaSleep wrote:

I usually store in the fridge, but read about those that put film in the
freezer. OK for it? More suited to long term storage? I've not had any
problem with cold storage in the fridge part in the past, just
wondering.

Locally film (well, good film) is harder to find. I just mail ordered
some Velvia 100F, and being more rolls than I will shoot right away,
wondered about the cold storage options...


In general, leave film in its original sealed packaging before
refrigerating or freezing. Allow film to warm to "room" temperature
before opening and using.

Refrigerated color film is usually good for 3 years past its expiration
date; b&w quite a bit longer. I've used b&w that was 5 years past with
no evidence of degradation.

Frozen film will keep "indefinitely."


Stef
  #7  
Old April 2nd 09, 12:49 AM posted to rec.photo.equipment.35mm
Alan Browne
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12,640
Default film storage - fridge or freezer?

Stefan Patric wrote:
On Wed, 01 Apr 2009 07:33:46 -0700, Beefy LaSleep wrote:

I usually store in the fridge, but read about those that put film in the
freezer. OK for it? More suited to long term storage? I've not had any
problem with cold storage in the fridge part in the past, just
wondering.

Locally film (well, good film) is harder to find. I just mail ordered
some Velvia 100F, and being more rolls than I will shoot right away,
wondered about the cold storage options...


In general, leave film in its original sealed packaging before
refrigerating or freezing. Allow film to warm to "room" temperature
before opening and using.

Refrigerated color film is usually good for 3 years past its expiration
date; b&w quite a bit longer. I've used b&w that was 5 years past with
no evidence of degradation.

Frozen film will keep "indefinitely."


Film is frozen at room temperature - even at 50C it is still frozen.

And no, it will not keep "indefinitely" but the lifetime will be
extended the colder the storage. On the other hand, with extended
storage time more gamma rays get to the film inexorably fogging it
regardless of temperature.

--
-- r.p.e.35mm user resource: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
-- r.p.d.slr-systems: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpdslrsysur.htm
-- [SI] gallery & rulz: http://www.pbase.com/shootin
-- e-meil: Remove FreeLunch.
-- usenet posts from gmail.com and googlemail.com are filtered out.
  #8  
Old April 2nd 09, 05:15 AM posted to rec.photo.equipment.35mm
Stormin Mormon
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 185
Default film storage - fridge or freezer?

Any film will be exposed by X-rays. Fortunately, naturally
occuring Xrays are minimal. And most of that is shielded by
your metal refrigerator case. I think that's a non issue.

X-ray security scanners at the airport are a concern. Also
please don't bring your film during dental or medical
X-rays.

I don't know how true this is. One person I met at church
told me of a federal inspector, who was checking on TSA
people. Right before the gate, he took his pistol out, and
put it in his briefcase. Sent the briefacse through the Xray
scanner. Asked the TSA person if s/he saw anything wrong.
No. Got his briefcase, and ran it through again. Anything
wrong? No. The inspector opened his briefcase, reholstered
his pistol and said "You're fired."

--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
..


"Bill Graham" wrote in message
...


I keep my slide film in the freezer, but I have been told by
others on this
forum that it will deteriorate from the action of cosmic
radiation even if
frozen, so I would hesitate to say it will last
forever.....I suppose I
could store it inside a lead box inside my freezer, but I am
in my 70's, so
such a thing would probably be overkill.......


  #9  
Old April 5th 09, 08:29 PM posted to rec.photo.equipment.35mm
tconway
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 52
Default film storage - fridge or freezer?


"Alan Browne" wrote in message
...
Stefan Patric wrote:
On Wed, 01 Apr 2009 07:33:46 -0700, Beefy LaSleep wrote:

I usually store in the fridge, but read about those that put film in the
freezer. OK for it? More suited to long term storage? I've not had any
problem with cold storage in the fridge part in the past, just
wondering.

Locally film (well, good film) is harder to find. I just mail ordered
some Velvia 100F, and being more rolls than I will shoot right away,
wondered about the cold storage options...


In general, leave film in its original sealed packaging before
refrigerating or freezing. Allow film to warm to "room" temperature
before opening and using.

Refrigerated color film is usually good for 3 years past its expiration
date; b&w quite a bit longer. I've used b&w that was 5 years past with
no evidence of degradation.

Frozen film will keep "indefinitely."


Film is frozen at room temperature - even at 50C it is still frozen.

And no, it will not keep "indefinitely" but the lifetime will be extended
the colder the storage. On the other hand, with extended storage time
more gamma rays get to the film inexorably fogging it regardless of
temperature.

--
-- r.p.e.35mm user resource: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
-- r.p.d.slr-systems: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpdslrsysur.htm
-- [SI] gallery & rulz: http://www.pbase.com/shootin
-- e-meil: Remove FreeLunch.
-- usenet posts from gmail.com and googlemail.com are filtered out.


I guess you could always line your fridge/freezer with lead sheeting.


  #10  
Old April 5th 09, 09:14 PM posted to rec.photo.equipment.35mm
Alan Browne
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12,640
Default film storage - fridge or freezer?

tconway wrote:
"Alan Browne" wrote in message
...
Stefan Patric wrote:
On Wed, 01 Apr 2009 07:33:46 -0700, Beefy LaSleep wrote:

I usually store in the fridge, but read about those that put film in the
freezer. OK for it? More suited to long term storage? I've not had any
problem with cold storage in the fridge part in the past, just
wondering.

Locally film (well, good film) is harder to find. I just mail ordered
some Velvia 100F, and being more rolls than I will shoot right away,
wondered about the cold storage options...
In general, leave film in its original sealed packaging before
refrigerating or freezing. Allow film to warm to "room" temperature
before opening and using.

Refrigerated color film is usually good for 3 years past its expiration
date; b&w quite a bit longer. I've used b&w that was 5 years past with
no evidence of degradation.

Frozen film will keep "indefinitely."

Film is frozen at room temperature - even at 50C it is still frozen.

And no, it will not keep "indefinitely" but the lifetime will be extended
the colder the storage. On the other hand, with extended storage time
more gamma rays get to the film inexorably fogging it regardless of
temperature.

I guess you could always line your fridge/freezer with lead sheeting.


For gamma rays I believe some plastics are actually more effective.
Just need an awful lot. Build a film locker under the pool - the water
will absorb a lot too...

I've seen other posts claiming that noticeable fogging won't occur for
about 32 years for ISO 100 film. I take that to mean 8 years for ISO
400. (Not sure about the origins of those numbers).

--
-- r.p.e.35mm user resource: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
-- r.p.d.slr-systems: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpdslrsysur.htm
-- [SI] gallery & rulz: http://www.pbase.com/shootin
-- e-meil: Remove FreeLunch.
-- usenet posts from gmail.com and googlemail.com are filtered out.
 




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