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Super Moon eclipse



 
 
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  #31  
Old September 26th 15, 11:11 PM posted to alt.photography,rec.photo.digital
nospam
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Posts: 24,165
Default Super Moon eclipse

In article , Mayayana
wrote:

|
What would really be useful is an app to
show you what's in front of you by using
the camera. Then you wouldn't trip over
anything while you look for the moon.


such apps exist.
  #32  
Old September 26th 15, 11:18 PM posted to alt.photography,rec.photo.digital
Davoud
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Posts: 639
Default Super Moon eclipse

rickman:
I am thinking of taking a trip down south next summer. I want to go far
enough south that when I turn 90 degrees to the right I will be headed
north.


Remember that in the place you're talking about, the first day of
spring was last week and summer starts in December. Remember, though,
that summer temperatures at the south pole rarely reach 0C.

--
I agree with almost everything that you have said and almost everything that
you will say in your entire life.

usenet *at* davidillig dawt cawm
  #33  
Old September 27th 15, 12:46 AM posted to rec.photo.digital
Davoud
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Posts: 639
Default Super Moon eclipse

RichA:
Don't forget. Exposure times from unclipsed full moon and fully-eclipsed
moon can vary from (at ISO 200) f/8 at 1/1000th to as much as 8
minutes(!need driven mounting).


You're just as ignorant here as you are in sci.astro.amateur.

You can't make an eight-minute exposure of the Moon; no telescope mount
is designed to track it precisely for that length of time and manual
guiding won't work over that length of time on a non-point source.
Furthermore, the moon is very bright when full, fairly bright in full
eclipse; I can't imagine any circumstance in which such a long exposure
would be required.

I typically photograph the Moon with a Questar Duplex
https://www.flickr.com/photos/primeval/21181354091, 89mm aperture, FL
1400mm @ 16.

Those who photograph the Moon at high-resolution and long focal lengths
(up to 8 meters, in my case) typically use scientific imaging cameras
such as those from Point Grey http://www.ptgrey.com/ to shoot video,
then they use special software to choose the best frames and align and
combine them.

Sometimes, though, one can get lucky with a single DSLR exposure. See
my 2009 photo at https://www.flickr.com/photos/primeval/21552899880/.
Made with an 1100mm 7.3 astronomical telescope @ ISO 100 and 1/250
sec.

--
I agree with almost everything that you have said and almost everything that
you will say in your entire life.

usenet *at* davidillig dawt cawm
  #34  
Old September 27th 15, 01:30 AM posted to rec.photo.digital
Ken Hart[_4_]
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Posts: 569
Default Super Moon eclipse

On 09/26/2015 07:46 PM, Davoud wrote:
RichA:
Don't forget. Exposure times from unclipsed full moon and fully-eclipsed
moon can vary from (at ISO 200) f/8 at 1/1000th to as much as 8
minutes(!need driven mounting).


You're just as ignorant here as you are in sci.astro.amateur.

You can't make an eight-minute exposure of the Moon; no telescope mount
is designed to track it precisely for that length of time and manual
guiding won't work over that length of time on a non-point source.
Furthermore, the moon is very bright when full, fairly bright in full
eclipse; I can't imagine any circumstance in which such a long exposure
would be required.

I typically photograph the Moon with a Questar Duplex
https://www.flickr.com/photos/primeval/21181354091, 89mm aperture, FL
1400mm @ 16.

Those who photograph the Moon at high-resolution and long focal lengths
(up to 8 meters, in my case) typically use scientific imaging cameras
such as those from Point Grey http://www.ptgrey.com/ to shoot video,
then they use special software to choose the best frames and align and
combine them.

Sometimes, though, one can get lucky with a single DSLR exposure. See
my 2009 photo at https://www.flickr.com/photos/primeval/21552899880/.
Made with an 1100mm 7.3 astronomical telescope @ ISO 100 and 1/250
sec.


That 8 minute exposure kind of threw me when I first saw it. I have
photos of a full moon, that I shoot using the "Sunny-16" rule (shutter
speed equals ISO, Full sun= f/16, etc.) at around f/5.6 or f/8.

I was guessing that a "blood moon" would be a couple or three stops down
from the light of a full moon.

I'll be shooting ISO400 ('cuz I've got a pile of that film!), using my
1200mm lenses with Canon FX cameras. Since my 1200mm is f/11, I'll be
adjusting the exposure with the shutter speed and shooting wide open. I
don't think depth of field will be an issue. I figure shutter speeds
from 1/125 to 1/30 should get it. I'll be shooting with two setups side
by side, with one setup a stop wider than the other. All this assumes
the weather holds, and each forecast is looking better.

I figured for metering I'd use a Luna-Pro. That's a joke- lunar eclipse,
"Luna"-Pro- get it?

--
Ken Hart

  #35  
Old September 27th 15, 01:42 AM posted to rec.photo.digital
Peter Irwin
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Posts: 352
Default Super Moon eclipse

Ken Hart wrote:

That 8 minute exposure kind of threw me when I first saw it. I have
photos of a full moon, that I shoot using the "Sunny-16" rule (shutter
speed equals ISO, Full sun= f/16, etc.) at around f/5.6 or f/8.

I was guessing that a "blood moon" would be a couple or three stops down
from the light of a full moon.


It varies hugely. Helen Hogg, in "The Stars Belong to Everyone" says
that there have been at least three cases when the eclipse was dark
enough that the moon disappeared entirely. (In two cases this seems
to have been connected to volcanic dust in the atmosphere, but in the
most recent case on June 10, 1816 that does not appear to have been
the explanation. At other times total eclipses of the moon have been
particularly bright, for instance in the eclipse of March 19, 1848,
the moon was so bright that many persons doubted that the moon was really
in eclipse. (see pages 112-113 of The Stars Belong to Everyone).

Peter.
--


  #36  
Old September 27th 15, 02:41 AM posted to alt.photography,rec.photo.digital
Savageduck[_3_]
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Posts: 16,487
Default Super Moon eclipse

On 2015-09-26 18:06:29 +0000, Savageduck said:

On 2015-09-26 16:08:41 +0000, Davoud said:

Giff:
I would like an app which, when I turn around the phone, shows me
exactly where to expect the moon to rise, does such an app exist?


Already mentioned in this thread: The Photographer's Ephemeris
http://photoephemeris.com/ covers sunrise/set and moonrise/set. No
need to rotate the phone or iPad. Also available free as a web app for
your Mac.

If you need the stars and deep-sky as well, try SkySafari Pro. Here you
get to wave your phone around.


The "Sky Guide" app for $2.99 does a pretty good job for those who want
sky mapping along with some basic information for iDevices. In the
basic view it shows your horizon with a running time line, and also
shows the various bodies below the horizon.
https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/sky-guide-view-stars-night/id576588894?mt=8
It does a similar job to "Sky Safari Pro" for those who might not want
to spend $40 on the app, and who might not need the more powerful app.
https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/skysafari-4-pro-planets-most/id766939977?mt=8

Here is an iPod "Sky Guide" screenshot taken this AM showing the Sun's
position. The same can be done for the Moon, satellites, etc.
https://db.tt/l5rATlME
...and a man made pass.
https://db.tt/6mqwhqR7


....and this evening, Moonrise tonight:
https://db.tt/2ePqHmrp

--
Regards,

Savageduck

  #37  
Old September 27th 15, 04:04 AM posted to rec.photo.digital
Michael[_6_]
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Posts: 313
Default Super Moon eclipse

On 2015-09-25 16:37:05 +0000, PeterN said:

This Sunday there will be a super moon, followed by a partial eclipse.
If any are interested in photographing it, check you local area for
exact times and locations.

There is a program that gives you specific information including times,
where to look, etc. The PC version is free.

http://photoephemeris.com/


Total eclipse, not partial.
--
Michael

  #38  
Old September 27th 15, 06:57 PM posted to alt.photography,rec.photo.digital
PeterN[_6_]
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Posts: 4,254
Default Super Moon eclipse

On 9/26/2015 6:11 PM, nospam wrote:
In article , Mayayana
wrote:

|
What would really be useful is an app to
show you what's in front of you by using
the camera. Then you wouldn't trip over
anything while you look for the moon.


such apps exist.


And in your typical helpful, and non-confrontational manner, you have
told us about one that works, and which is better in your opinion, and why.


--
PeterN
  #39  
Old September 27th 15, 07:21 PM posted to alt.photography,rec.photo.digital
John McWilliams
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Posts: 6,945
Default Super Moon eclipse

On 9/26/15 PDT 10:09 AM, nospam wrote:
In article , Mayayana
wrote:

| I would like an app which, when I turn around the phone, shows me
| exactly where to expect the moon to rise, does such an app exist?
|
There's no need for an app. It's easy to find moon
phase times online. Here's an example:

http://www.calendar-365.com/moon/moon-phases.html


it's much easier with an app on a phone that tells you where the moon
is *now* and which can be checked while outside and not just for the
moon either.


Some apps on the iPhone don't require you to be outside at all. As long
as you're in a location known to the phone, and it has a recent
orientation, your WiFi or cell connection will do it all. Night Sky is
one such app.

  #40  
Old September 27th 15, 07:27 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
John McWilliams
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Posts: 6,945
Default Super Moon eclipse

On 9/26/15 PDT 5:30 PM, Ken Hart wrote:
On 09/26/2015 07:46 PM, Davoud wrote:
RichA:
Don't forget. Exposure times from unclipsed full moon and
fully-eclipsed
moon can vary from (at ISO 200) f/8 at 1/1000th to as much as 8
minutes(!need driven mounting).


You're just as ignorant here as you are in sci.astro.amateur.

You can't make an eight-minute exposure of the Moon; no telescope mount
is designed to track it precisely for that length of time and manual
guiding won't work over that length of time on a non-point source.
Furthermore, the moon is very bright when full, fairly bright in full
eclipse; I can't imagine any circumstance in which such a long exposure
would be required.

I typically photograph the Moon with a Questar Duplex
https://www.flickr.com/photos/primeval/21181354091, 89mm aperture, FL
1400mm @ 16.

Those who photograph the Moon at high-resolution and long focal lengths
(up to 8 meters, in my case) typically use scientific imaging cameras
such as those from Point Grey http://www.ptgrey.com/ to shoot video,
then they use special software to choose the best frames and align and
combine them.

Sometimes, though, one can get lucky with a single DSLR exposure. See
my 2009 photo at https://www.flickr.com/photos/primeval/21552899880/.
Made with an 1100mm 7.3 astronomical telescope @ ISO 100 and 1/250
sec.


That 8 minute exposure kind of threw me when I first saw it. I have
photos of a full moon, that I shoot using the "Sunny-16" rule (shutter
speed equals ISO, Full sun= f/16, etc.) at around f/5.6 or f/8.

I was guessing that a "blood moon" would be a couple or three stops down
from the light of a full moon.


I'll shoot wide open, leaving ASA at my standard 200. I'll chimp each
one until I get the exposure right. Has worked in the past, we'll see
about this one.


 




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