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A few more from Yosemite



 
 
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  #21  
Old May 19th 17, 02:56 AM posted to rec.photo.digital
Savageduck[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 14,632
Default A few more from Yosemite

On 2017-05-19 01:12:39 +0000, "Mayayana" said:

"Savageduck" wrote

| Perhaps you should do some research, and read the following:
| " The angle-bracket "" and "" and double-quote (") characters are
| excluded because they are often used as the delimiters around URI in
| text documents and protocol fields. The character "#" is excluded
| because it is used to delimit a URI from a fragment identifier in URI
| references (Section 4). The percent character "%" is excluded because
| it is used for the encoding of escaped characters.
|

He's just talking about what can't be used in a
URL because it's used in HTML.


That is the point.

In HTML code
you might have something like
A HREF="www.dropbox.com"dropbox/A

But that's in the code itself. Newsreaders and email
programs recognize a URL by the syntax and act
accordingly. Your addition of is irrelevant. It's
not proper, readable HTML and it would make no
difference if it were, just as my HTML snippet above
will show as plain text in this post because this post
is not HTML. You could just as easily have used
*www.dropbox.com* or (www.dropbox.com). The
extra marks serve no purpose. (Though some
marks may prevent your newsreadr from recognizing
the line as a link.)


I think that we are talking at cross purposes.
My typing the text of a URL into the UTF-8 text encoding of my Usenet
client, has nothing to do with HTML, never has.

I use two Usenet clients as my mood takes me, Unison, and Hogwasher,
and neither supports HTML. When I use my iPhone or iPad to access
Usenet I use NewsTap which also foregoes HTML. Since the " " are not
part of the HTML set, and not read by HTML, they serve a useful
function as a URL delimiter when used in a text transmission.

....and I don't use HTML for my email.

| ...and why would the above clickable URL contained, and delimited by
| angle-brackets be less secure than the undelimited version below?
| http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc2396.txt

It's not. I didn't mean to complicate things. I was
just noting that your brackets are superfluous and
that it's easier to copy the URL without them. Not to
worry. If you find it convenient it's no big deal.

The security part is not directly related. I use a
number of browsers
and clicking a link in email or a newsgroup post will
activate the default browser. I happen to have IE set
as the default, which I don't allow to go online. I block
it at the firewall. Why? Because IE is profoundly unsafe
and quirky in rendering webpages. But it's good for using
on Windows. I like to use it for reading HTML files locally.
It's quick and lightweight. I also don't want to risk
accidentally clicking a link in something without meaning to.
I also don't want software going online without asking.
By setting IE as the default I have a good reader for local
HTML files while I also block anything going online that I
didn't specifically intend to do so.

Thus, when someone sends or posts a link, I copy
it and paste into Firefox or Pale Moon.

I don't know if you have default programs on Mac.


Default programs for what purpose?

I have several programs on my Mac and on my iOS devices which could be
considered default. However, I always have the option to use something
different and set that as a default for any particular use.

I guess you probably don't even see the full file names.
On Windows, the default program is automatically
called for a specific file extension.


Why wouldn't I see the full file names with extensions when using MacOS?

So for instance, if
I install software that then tries to call home without
asking, that will call up my default browser, which is
IE, which will then show an error window saying that
it's unable to reach the website. Likewise, if I
accidentally click a link in an email without meaning
to, that will call IE which will be unable to reach the link.
Thus, my arrangement is handy for both privacy and
security.


I wouldn't be caught using IE either. ;-)


--
Regards,

Savageduck

  #22  
Old May 19th 17, 03:11 AM posted to rec.photo.digital
PeterN[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,245
Default A few more from Yosemite

On 5/18/2017 9:56 PM, Savageduck wrote:
On 2017-05-19 01:12:39 +0000, "Mayayana" said:

"Savageduck" wrote

| Perhaps you should do some research, and read the following:
| " The angle-bracket "" and "" and double-quote (") characters are
| excluded because they are often used as the delimiters around URI in
| text documents and protocol fields. The character "#" is excluded
| because it is used to delimit a URI from a fragment identifier in URI
| references (Section 4). The percent character "%" is excluded because
| it is used for the encoding of escaped characters.
|

He's just talking about what can't be used in a
URL because it's used in HTML.


That is the point.

In HTML code
you might have something like
A HREF="www.dropbox.com"dropbox/A

But that's in the code itself. Newsreaders and email
programs recognize a URL by the syntax and act
accordingly. Your addition of is irrelevant. It's
not proper, readable HTML and it would make no
difference if it were, just as my HTML snippet above
will show as plain text in this post because this post
is not HTML. You could just as easily have used
*www.dropbox.com* or (www.dropbox.com). The
extra marks serve no purpose. (Though some
marks may prevent your newsreadr from recognizing
the line as a link.)


I think that we are talking at cross purposes.
My typing the text of a URL into the UTF-8 text encoding of my Usenet
client, has nothing to do with HTML, never has.

I use two Usenet clients as my mood takes me, Unison, and Hogwasher, and
neither supports HTML. When I use my iPhone or iPad to access Usenet I
use NewsTap which also foregoes HTML. Since the " " are not part of
the HTML set, and not read by HTML, they serve a useful function as a
URL delimiter when used in a text transmission.

...and I don't use HTML for my email.

| ...and why would the above clickable URL contained, and delimited by
| angle-brackets be less secure than the undelimited version below?
| http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc2396.txt

It's not. I didn't mean to complicate things. I was
just noting that your brackets are superfluous and
that it's easier to copy the URL without them. Not to
worry. If you find it convenient it's no big deal.

The security part is not directly related. I use a
number of browsers
and clicking a link in email or a newsgroup post will
activate the default browser. I happen to have IE set
as the default, which I don't allow to go online. I block
it at the firewall. Why? Because IE is profoundly unsafe
and quirky in rendering webpages. But it's good for using
on Windows. I like to use it for reading HTML files locally.
It's quick and lightweight. I also don't want to risk
accidentally clicking a link in something without meaning to.
I also don't want software going online without asking.
By setting IE as the default I have a good reader for local
HTML files while I also block anything going online that I
didn't specifically intend to do so.

Thus, when someone sends or posts a link, I copy
it and paste into Firefox or Pale Moon.

I don't know if you have default programs on Mac.


Default programs for what purpose?

I have several programs on my Mac and on my iOS devices which could be
considered default. However, I always have the option to use something
different and set that as a default for any particular use.

I guess you probably don't even see the full file names.
On Windows, the default program is automatically
called for a specific file extension.


Why wouldn't I see the full file names with extensions when using MacOS?

So for instance, if
I install software that then tries to call home without
asking, that will call up my default browser, which is
IE, which will then show an error window saying that
it's unable to reach the website. Likewise, if I
accidentally click a link in an email without meaning
to, that will call IE which will be unable to reach the link.
Thus, my arrangement is handy for both privacy and
security.


I wouldn't be caught using IE either. ;-)


Does that mean you are a closet IE user? ;-p

--
PeterN
  #23  
Old May 19th 17, 03:32 AM posted to rec.photo.digital
Savageduck[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 14,632
Default A few more from Yosemite

On 2017-05-19 02:11:02 +0000, PeterN said:

On 5/18/2017 9:56 PM, Savageduck wrote:
On 2017-05-19 01:12:39 +0000, "Mayayana" said:

"Savageduck" wrote

| Perhaps you should do some research, and read the following:
| " The angle-bracket "" and "" and double-quote (") characters are
| excluded because they are often used as the delimiters around URI in
| text documents and protocol fields. The character "#" is excluded
| because it is used to delimit a URI from a fragment identifier in URI
| references (Section 4). The percent character "%" is excluded because
| it is used for the encoding of escaped characters.
|

He's just talking about what can't be used in a
URL because it's used in HTML.


That is the point.

In HTML code
you might have something like
A HREF="www.dropbox.com"dropbox/A

But that's in the code itself. Newsreaders and email
programs recognize a URL by the syntax and act
accordingly. Your addition of is irrelevant. It's
not proper, readable HTML and it would make no
difference if it were, just as my HTML snippet above
will show as plain text in this post because this post
is not HTML. You could just as easily have used
*www.dropbox.com* or (www.dropbox.com). The
extra marks serve no purpose. (Though some
marks may prevent your newsreadr from recognizing
the line as a link.)


I think that we are talking at cross purposes.
My typing the text of a URL into the UTF-8 text encoding of my Usenet
client, has nothing to do with HTML, never has.

I use two Usenet clients as my mood takes me, Unison, and Hogwasher, and
neither supports HTML. When I use my iPhone or iPad to access Usenet I
use NewsTap which also foregoes HTML. Since the " " are not part of
the HTML set, and not read by HTML, they serve a useful function as a
URL delimiter when used in a text transmission.

...and I don't use HTML for my email.

| ...and why would the above clickable URL contained, and delimited by
| angle-brackets be less secure than the undelimited version below?
| http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc2396.txt

It's not. I didn't mean to complicate things. I was
just noting that your brackets are superfluous and
that it's easier to copy the URL without them. Not to
worry. If you find it convenient it's no big deal.

The security part is not directly related. I use a
number of browsers
and clicking a link in email or a newsgroup post will
activate the default browser. I happen to have IE set
as the default, which I don't allow to go online. I block
it at the firewall. Why? Because IE is profoundly unsafe
and quirky in rendering webpages. But it's good for using
on Windows. I like to use it for reading HTML files locally.
It's quick and lightweight. I also don't want to risk
accidentally clicking a link in something without meaning to.
I also don't want software going online without asking.
By setting IE as the default I have a good reader for local
HTML files while I also block anything going online that I
didn't specifically intend to do so.

Thus, when someone sends or posts a link, I copy
it and paste into Firefox or Pale Moon.

I don't know if you have default programs on Mac.


Default programs for what purpose?

I have several programs on my Mac and on my iOS devices which could be
considered default. However, I always have the option to use something
different and set that as a default for any particular use.

I guess you probably don't even see the full file names.
On Windows, the default program is automatically
called for a specific file extension.


Why wouldn't I see the full file names with extensions when using MacOS?

So for instance, if
I install software that then tries to call home without
asking, that will call up my default browser, which is
IE, which will then show an error window saying that
it's unable to reach the website. Likewise, if I
accidentally click a link in an email without meaning
to, that will call IE which will be unable to reach the link.
Thus, my arrangement is handy for both privacy and
security.


I wouldn't be caught using IE either. ;-)


Does that mean you are a closet IE user? ;-p


Not even close.
For most stuff I use Safari, and I use Chrome together with the Zenmate
VPN extension for my surreptitious BBC viewing, and some other browsing.

Once upon a time, back when MS provided a Mac System 7 edition of IE I
used it briefly. Now I am thankful there is no current Mac edition of
IE.
--
Regards,

Savageduck

  #24  
Old May 19th 17, 04:00 AM posted to rec.photo.digital
Mayayana
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,238
Default A few more from Yosemite

"Savageduck" wrote

| I think that we are talking at cross purposes.

Maybe. It's not worth a long discussion, at
any rate. If you want to use brackets then
go ahead. I appreciate seeing peoples' photos
and the brackets are really not a big deal. It
was just a comment.


  #25  
Old May 19th 17, 04:15 AM posted to rec.photo.digital
nospam
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 20,282
Default A few more from Yosemite

In article [email protected],
Savageduck wrote:


Once upon a time, back when MS provided a Mac System 7 edition of IE I
used it briefly. Now I am thankful there is no current Mac edition of
IE.


mac internet explorer was actually pretty good for its time. it was
discontinued in 2003, after apple introduced safari.

it also used an entirely different render engine than the windows
version, written by an entirely different team. the only thing it had
in common with the windows version was its name.

unlike today, there weren't a wide variety of browsers back then. it
was basically just netscape and ie.
  #26  
Old May 19th 17, 02:02 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
David B.[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 38
Default A few more from Yosemite

On 5/19/2017 3:32 AM, Savageduck wrote:
On 2017-05-19 02:11:02 +0000, PeterN said:

On 5/18/2017 9:56 PM, Savageduck wrote:
On 2017-05-19 01:12:39 +0000, "Mayayana" said:

"Savageduck" wrote

| Perhaps you should do some research, and read the following:
| " The angle-bracket "" and "" and double-quote (") characters are
| excluded because they are often used as the delimiters around
URI in
| text documents and protocol fields. The character "#" is excluded
| because it is used to delimit a URI from a fragment identifier
in URI
| references (Section 4). The percent character "%" is excluded
because
| it is used for the encoding of escaped characters.
|

He's just talking about what can't be used in a
URL because it's used in HTML.

That is the point.

In HTML code
you might have something like
A HREF="www.dropbox.com"dropbox/A

But that's in the code itself. Newsreaders and email
programs recognize a URL by the syntax and act
accordingly. Your addition of is irrelevant. It's
not proper, readable HTML and it would make no
difference if it were, just as my HTML snippet above
will show as plain text in this post because this post
is not HTML. You could just as easily have used
*www.dropbox.com* or (www.dropbox.com). The
extra marks serve no purpose. (Though some
marks may prevent your newsreadr from recognizing
the line as a link.)

I think that we are talking at cross purposes.
My typing the text of a URL into the UTF-8 text encoding of my Usenet
client, has nothing to do with HTML, never has.

I use two Usenet clients as my mood takes me, Unison, and Hogwasher, and
neither supports HTML. When I use my iPhone or iPad to access Usenet I
use NewsTap which also foregoes HTML. Since the " " are not part of
the HTML set, and not read by HTML, they serve a useful function as a
URL delimiter when used in a text transmission.

...and I don't use HTML for my email.

| ...and why would the above clickable URL contained, and delimited by
| angle-brackets be less secure than the undelimited version below?
| http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc2396.txt

It's not. I didn't mean to complicate things. I was
just noting that your brackets are superfluous and
that it's easier to copy the URL without them. Not to
worry. If you find it convenient it's no big deal.

The security part is not directly related. I use a
number of browsers
and clicking a link in email or a newsgroup post will
activate the default browser. I happen to have IE set
as the default, which I don't allow to go online. I block
it at the firewall. Why? Because IE is profoundly unsafe
and quirky in rendering webpages. But it's good for using
on Windows. I like to use it for reading HTML files locally.
It's quick and lightweight. I also don't want to risk
accidentally clicking a link in something without meaning to.
I also don't want software going online without asking.
By setting IE as the default I have a good reader for local
HTML files while I also block anything going online that I
didn't specifically intend to do so.

Thus, when someone sends or posts a link, I copy
it and paste into Firefox or Pale Moon.

I don't know if you have default programs on Mac.

Default programs for what purpose?

I have several programs on my Mac and on my iOS devices which could be
considered default. However, I always have the option to use something
different and set that as a default for any particular use.

I guess you probably don't even see the full file names.
On Windows, the default program is automatically
called for a specific file extension.

Why wouldn't I see the full file names with extensions when using MacOS?

So for instance, if
I install software that then tries to call home without
asking, that will call up my default browser, which is
IE, which will then show an error window saying that
it's unable to reach the website. Likewise, if I
accidentally click a link in an email without meaning
to, that will call IE which will be unable to reach the link.
Thus, my arrangement is handy for both privacy and
security.

I wouldn't be caught using IE either. ;-)


Does that mean you are a closet IE user? ;-p


Not even close.
For most stuff I use Safari, and I use Chrome together with the Zenmate
VPN extension for my surreptitious BBC viewing, and some other browsing.


I do much the same, but ......

I'm shocked to learn that a fellow like you would break the law! ;-)

Once upon a time, back when MS provided a Mac System 7 edition of IE I
used it briefly. Now I am thankful there is no current Mac edition of IE.


--
David B.
  #27  
Old May 19th 17, 03:50 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
Savageduck[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 14,632
Default A few more from Yosemite

On 2017-05-19 13:02:37 +0000, "David B." said:

On 5/19/2017 3:32 AM, Savageduck wrote:
On 2017-05-19 02:11:02 +0000, PeterN said:

On 5/18/2017 9:56 PM, Savageduck wrote:
On 2017-05-19 01:12:39 +0000, "Mayayana" said:

"Savageduck" wrote

| Perhaps you should do some research, and read the following:
| " The angle-bracket "" and "" and double-quote (") characters are
| excluded because they are often used as the delimiters around URI in
| text documents and protocol fields. The character "#" is excluded
| because it is used to delimit a URI from a fragment identifier in URI
| references (Section 4). The percent character "%" is excluded because
| it is used for the encoding of escaped characters.
|

He's just talking about what can't be used in a
URL because it's used in HTML.

That is the point.

In HTML code
you might have something like
A HREF="www.dropbox.com"dropbox/A

But that's in the code itself. Newsreaders and email
programs recognize a URL by the syntax and act
accordingly. Your addition of is irrelevant. It's
not proper, readable HTML and it would make no
difference if it were, just as my HTML snippet above
will show as plain text in this post because this post
is not HTML. You could just as easily have used
*www.dropbox.com* or (www.dropbox.com). The
extra marks serve no purpose. (Though some
marks may prevent your newsreadr from recognizing
the line as a link.)

I think that we are talking at cross purposes.
My typing the text of a URL into the UTF-8 text encoding of my Usenet
client, has nothing to do with HTML, never has.

I use two Usenet clients as my mood takes me, Unison, and Hogwasher, and
neither supports HTML. When I use my iPhone or iPad to access Usenet I
use NewsTap which also foregoes HTML. Since the " " are not part of
the HTML set, and not read by HTML, they serve a useful function as a
URL delimiter when used in a text transmission.

...and I don't use HTML for my email.

| ...and why would the above clickable URL contained, and delimited by
| angle-brackets be less secure than the undelimited version below?
| http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc2396.txt

It's not. I didn't mean to complicate things. I was
just noting that your brackets are superfluous and
that it's easier to copy the URL without them. Not to
worry. If you find it convenient it's no big deal.

The security part is not directly related. I use a
number of browsers
and clicking a link in email or a newsgroup post will
activate the default browser. I happen to have IE set
as the default, which I don't allow to go online. I block
it at the firewall. Why? Because IE is profoundly unsafe
and quirky in rendering webpages. But it's good for using
on Windows. I like to use it for reading HTML files locally.
It's quick and lightweight. I also don't want to risk
accidentally clicking a link in something without meaning to.
I also don't want software going online without asking.
By setting IE as the default I have a good reader for local
HTML files while I also block anything going online that I
didn't specifically intend to do so.

Thus, when someone sends or posts a link, I copy
it and paste into Firefox or Pale Moon.

I don't know if you have default programs on Mac.

Default programs for what purpose?

I have several programs on my Mac and on my iOS devices which could be
considered default. However, I always have the option to use something
different and set that as a default for any particular use.

I guess you probably don't even see the full file names.
On Windows, the default program is automatically
called for a specific file extension.

Why wouldn't I see the full file names with extensions when using MacOS?

So for instance, if
I install software that then tries to call home without
asking, that will call up my default browser, which is
IE, which will then show an error window saying that
it's unable to reach the website. Likewise, if I
accidentally click a link in an email without meaning
to, that will call IE which will be unable to reach the link.
Thus, my arrangement is handy for both privacy and
security.

I wouldn't be caught using IE either. ;-)


Does that mean you are a closet IE user? ;-p


Not even close.
For most stuff I use Safari, and I use Chrome together with the Zenmate
VPN extension for my surreptitious BBC viewing, and some other browsing.


I do much the same, but ......

I'm shocked to learn that a fellow like you would break the law! ;-)


What Law?
We rebelled against the crown in 1776. I am just keeping up a tradition.
What is a boy, whose Trans-Atlantic family thoroughly twisted his
thought process with the Goons, to do?

--
Regards,

Savageduck

  #28  
Old May 19th 17, 03:59 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
David B.[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 38
Default A few more from Yosemite

On 5/19/2017 3:24 PM, Whisky-dave wrote:
On Friday, 19 May 2017 14:02:44 UTC+1, David B. wrote:
On 5/19/2017 3:32 AM, Savageduck wrote:



Not even close.
For most stuff I use Safari, and I use Chrome together with the Zenmate
VPN extension for my surreptitious BBC viewing, and some other browsing.


I do much the same, but ......

I'm shocked to learn that a fellow like you would break the law! ;-)

Once upon a time, back when MS provided a Mac System 7 edition of IE I
used it briefly. Now I am thankful there is no current Mac edition of IE.


--
David B.


Ah but he's not breaking his laws only ours ;-)


Indeed! ;-)

I think my TV license is due at the end of the month....


I've paid mine by Direct Debit, monthly, for years!

--
David B.

  #29  
Old May 19th 17, 04:06 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
David B.[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 38
Default A few more from Yosemite

On 5/19/2017 3:50 PM, Savageduck wrote:
On 2017-05-19 13:02:37 +0000, "David B." said:

On 5/19/2017 3:32 AM, Savageduck wrote:
On 2017-05-19 02:11:02 +0000, PeterN said:

On 5/18/2017 9:56 PM, Savageduck wrote:
On 2017-05-19 01:12:39 +0000, "Mayayana"
said:

"Savageduck" wrote

| Perhaps you should do some research, and read the following:
| " The angle-bracket "" and "" and double-quote (")
characters are
| excluded because they are often used as the delimiters around
URI in
| text documents and protocol fields. The character "#" is
excluded
| because it is used to delimit a URI from a fragment identifier
in URI
| references (Section 4). The percent character "%" is excluded
because
| it is used for the encoding of escaped characters.
|

He's just talking about what can't be used in a
URL because it's used in HTML.

That is the point.

In HTML code
you might have something like
A HREF="www.dropbox.com"dropbox/A

But that's in the code itself. Newsreaders and email
programs recognize a URL by the syntax and act
accordingly. Your addition of is irrelevant. It's
not proper, readable HTML and it would make no
difference if it were, just as my HTML snippet above
will show as plain text in this post because this post
is not HTML. You could just as easily have used
*www.dropbox.com* or (www.dropbox.com). The
extra marks serve no purpose. (Though some
marks may prevent your newsreadr from recognizing
the line as a link.)

I think that we are talking at cross purposes.
My typing the text of a URL into the UTF-8 text encoding of my Usenet
client, has nothing to do with HTML, never has.

I use two Usenet clients as my mood takes me, Unison, and
Hogwasher, and
neither supports HTML. When I use my iPhone or iPad to access Usenet I
use NewsTap which also foregoes HTML. Since the " " are not part of
the HTML set, and not read by HTML, they serve a useful function as a
URL delimiter when used in a text transmission.

...and I don't use HTML for my email.

| ...and why would the above clickable URL contained, and
delimited by
| angle-brackets be less secure than the undelimited version below?
| http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc2396.txt

It's not. I didn't mean to complicate things. I was
just noting that your brackets are superfluous and
that it's easier to copy the URL without them. Not to
worry. If you find it convenient it's no big deal.

The security part is not directly related. I use a
number of browsers
and clicking a link in email or a newsgroup post will
activate the default browser. I happen to have IE set
as the default, which I don't allow to go online. I block
it at the firewall. Why? Because IE is profoundly unsafe
and quirky in rendering webpages. But it's good for using
on Windows. I like to use it for reading HTML files locally.
It's quick and lightweight. I also don't want to risk
accidentally clicking a link in something without meaning to.
I also don't want software going online without asking.
By setting IE as the default I have a good reader for local
HTML files while I also block anything going online that I
didn't specifically intend to do so.

Thus, when someone sends or posts a link, I copy
it and paste into Firefox or Pale Moon.

I don't know if you have default programs on Mac.

Default programs for what purpose?

I have several programs on my Mac and on my iOS devices which could be
considered default. However, I always have the option to use something
different and set that as a default for any particular use.

I guess you probably don't even see the full file names.
On Windows, the default program is automatically
called for a specific file extension.

Why wouldn't I see the full file names with extensions when using
MacOS?

So for instance, if
I install software that then tries to call home without
asking, that will call up my default browser, which is
IE, which will then show an error window saying that
it's unable to reach the website. Likewise, if I
accidentally click a link in an email without meaning
to, that will call IE which will be unable to reach the link.
Thus, my arrangement is handy for both privacy and
security.

I wouldn't be caught using IE either. ;-)


Does that mean you are a closet IE user? ;-p

Not even close.
For most stuff I use Safari, and I use Chrome together with the
Zenmate VPN extension for my surreptitious BBC viewing, and some
other browsing.


I do much the same, but ......

I'm shocked to learn that a fellow like you would break the law! ;-)


What Law?


Don't worry - it's OUR law, not yours! ;-)

We rebelled against the crown in 1776. I am just keeping up a tradition.


You Americans are just *BAD*!!!

What is a boy, whose Trans-Atlantic family thoroughly twisted his
thought process with the Goons, to do?


NOW we're getting to the REAL truth!!! ;-)

--
David B.

  #30  
Old May 19th 17, 05:02 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
David B.[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 38
Default A few more from Yosemite

On 5/19/2017 4:47 PM, Whisky-dave wrote:

we have to pay for a license by law.


Only if one has a TV set!

 




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