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Film scanners?



 
 
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  #1  
Old April 15th 17, 01:22 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
newshound
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 208
Default Film scanners?

I realise that this question doesn't have a simple answer, but it is
time I started scanning some of my old 35 mm slides and negatives
(mostly b&w).

I would really welcome some comments or experience on hardware in the
"keen amateur" price bracket.

I know I can also "farm it out" but I'm interested in doing some myself
at least to get a feel for what results to inspect. Is there anything
which stands out towards the budget end in terms of value for money or
ease of use?

Thanks in advance

Steve
  #2  
Old April 15th 17, 02:00 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
Sandman
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Posts: 5,393
Default Film scanners?

In article , newshound
wrote:

I realise that this question doesn't have a simple answer, but it is
time I started scanning some of my old 35 mm slides and negatives
(mostly b&w).


I would really welcome some comments or experience on hardware in
the "keen amateur" price bracket.


Hey, that's my bracket as well!

I use the Epson Perfection V750 Pro (now replaced with the 850 Pro) which
comes with inserts for 135 and 120 film as well as large format and slides.

Image quality is superb.

https://epson.com/For-Work/Scanners/...on-Perfection-
V850-Pro-Photo-Scanner/p/B11B224201

--
Sandman
  #3  
Old April 15th 17, 11:03 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
Eric Stevens
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Posts: 11,851
Default Film scanners?

On 15 Apr 2017 13:00:12 GMT, Sandman wrote:

In article , newshound
wrote:

I realise that this question doesn't have a simple answer, but it is
time I started scanning some of my old 35 mm slides and negatives
(mostly b&w).


I would really welcome some comments or experience on hardware in
the "keen amateur" price bracket.


Hey, that's my bracket as well!

I use the Epson Perfection V750 Pro (now replaced with the 850 Pro) which
comes with inserts for 135 and 120 film as well as large format and slides.

Image quality is superb.

https://epson.com/For-Work/Scanners/...on-Perfection-
V850-Pro-Photo-Scanner/p/B11B224201


I have used an Epson V700 for years. This is basically the same as a
V750 but with a few less bells and whistles. I have scanned hundreds
(thousands?) of old films and slides and found it has done a better
than excellent job. It came with extensive software which enables
major corrections to be made at the scanning level. Highly
recommended.
--

Regards,

Eric Stevens
  #4  
Old April 16th 17, 03:19 AM posted to rec.photo.digital
philo
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 393
Default Film scanners?

On 04/15/2017 05:03 PM, Eric Stevens wrote:
On 15 Apr 2017 13:00:12 GMT, Sandman wrote:

In article , newshound
wrote:

I realise that this question doesn't have a simple answer, but it is
time I started scanning some of my old 35 mm slides and negatives
(mostly b&w).


I would really welcome some comments or experience on hardware in
the "keen amateur" price bracket.


Hey, that's my bracket as well!

I use the Epson Perfection V750 Pro (now replaced with the 850 Pro) which
comes with inserts for 135 and 120 film as well as large format and slides.

Image quality is superb.

https://epson.com/For-Work/Scanners/...on-Perfection-
V850-Pro-Photo-Scanner/p/B11B224201


I have used an Epson V700 for years. This is basically the same as a
V750 but with a few less bells and whistles. I have scanned hundreds
(thousands?) of old films and slides and found it has done a better
than excellent job. It came with extensive software which enables
major corrections to be made at the scanning level. Highly
recommended.




I use the Epson V600 it's less expensive and very high quality scans
  #5  
Old April 16th 17, 01:41 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
Sandman
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,393
Default Film scanners?

In article , Eric Stevens wrote:

newshound:
I realise that this question doesn't have a simple answer, but
it is time I started scanning some of my old 35 mm slides and
negatives (mostly b&w).


I would really welcome some comments or experience on hardware
in the "keen amateur" price bracket.


Sandman:
Hey, that's my bracket as well!


I use the Epson Perfection V750 Pro (now replaced with the 850
Pro) which comes with inserts for 135 and 120 film as well as
large format and slides.


Image quality is superb.


https://epson.com/For-Work/Scanners/...on-Perfection-
V850-Pro-Photo-Scanner/p/B11B224201


I have used an Epson V700 for years. This is basically the same as a
V750 but with a few less bells and whistles. I have scanned hundreds
(thousands?) of old films and slides and found it has done a better
than excellent job. It came with extensive software which enables
major corrections to be made at the scanning level. Highly
recommended.


Yeah, outside of specialised lab scanners, I think these are the best in the
class really.

--
Sandman
  #6  
Old April 17th 17, 12:31 AM posted to rec.photo.digital
Eric Stevens
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 11,851
Default Film scanners?

On Sun, 16 Apr 2017 10:03:09 +1200, Eric Stevens
wrote:

On 15 Apr 2017 13:00:12 GMT, Sandman wrote:

In article , newshound
wrote:

I realise that this question doesn't have a simple answer, but it is
time I started scanning some of my old 35 mm slides and negatives
(mostly b&w).


I would really welcome some comments or experience on hardware in
the "keen amateur" price bracket.


Hey, that's my bracket as well!

I use the Epson Perfection V750 Pro (now replaced with the 850 Pro) which
comes with inserts for 135 and 120 film as well as large format and slides.

Image quality is superb.

https://epson.com/For-Work/Scanners/...on-Perfection-
V850-Pro-Photo-Scanner/p/B11B224201


I have used an Epson V700 for years. This is basically the same as a
V750 but with a few less bells and whistles. I have scanned hundreds
(thousands?) of old films and slides and found it has done a better
than excellent job. It came with extensive software which enables
major corrections to be made at the scanning level. Highly
recommended.


The V700/750 come with Digital Ice built in.
--

Regards,

Eric Stevens
  #7  
Old April 17th 17, 12:42 AM posted to rec.photo.digital
nospam
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 20,660
Default Film scanners?

In article , Eric Stevens
wrote:


The V700/750 come with Digital Ice built in.


built into the *software*.

the scanner itself has infrared illumination built in, which other
software can use for dust removal, it just can't be called digital ice.
  #8  
Old April 18th 17, 02:17 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
-hh
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 644
Default Film scanners?

On Saturday, April 15, 2017 at 9:00:16 AM UTC-4, Sandman wrote:
newshound wrote:

I realise that this question doesn't have a simple answer,
but it is time I started scanning some of my old 35 mm slides
and negatives (mostly b&w).


I would really welcome some comments or experience on hardware
in the "keen amateur" price bracket.


Hey, that's my bracket as well!


Same here.


I use the Epson Perfection V750 Pro (now replaced with the 850 Pro) which
comes with inserts for 135 and 120 film as well as large format and slides.

Image quality is superb.

https://epson.com/For-Work/Scanners/...on-Perfection-
V850-Pro-Photo-Scanner/p/B11B224201


I originally started at work with a Nikon Coolscan LS-1000; think
this was far enough back that it ran on SCSI. Nice setup, although
it appears to now be 99.99% dead because of a combination of the
interface (SCSI) and not easily being able to find suitable drivers.
Kind of wish that I'd kept an old Mac on System 7/8 around for it.

For myself, I have a now-dated Epson flatbed scanner like Sandman;
the OEM software has gone obsolete, but OS X supports it adequately,
plus I think I have some third party (Viewscan?) that also does well.
It has a backlight system and does a good job on transparencies,
including some medium format stuff.

For $200 I picked up a dedicated 35mm Pacific Image USB scanner,
with the idea of pushing through more quantity. After some initial
proofing, I've not gotten back to the project.

My thoughts today are more lazy ^H^H pragmatic:

Set up the slide projector at home, with a dSLR on a tripod next
to it ... project, click, project, click ... this is a quick &
dirty way to get a halfway decent quality image quickly, which
is better than nothing.

My thoughts are that I'd do this as a pre-screening and also as
a "risk-of-loss" reduction step before I send a batch of stuff
out to a 3rd party service for bulk scanning. Similarly, for
any really important shots I come across the way, I'd DIY a
higher quality scan before I put them into the ship-em-out box.

What I've found that it really comes down to is that it is
still a challenge to make the time to grind through the film
collection, and when I finally do, two things hold me up:

- cleaning the images (especially Dad's old slides)
- the temptation to jump right into Photoshop to post-process

Overall, I think that what I'd probably do differently next
time that I take this on would be to define out a more "mass"
based workflow with discrete stages.

Stage 0: reorganize my workspaces. My current setup is
conveniently compact to fit into the home office space, but
this contrary to good productivity for this type of job.
This is where I wish that I had a "150ft long workbench"
to be able to spread stuff out.

Stage 1: pull out the material to be worked on; figure out
what batch size works.

Stage 2: cleaning in batches. Need both a dry & wet plan,
as stuff like Dad's old dusty slides are bad and won't clean
up with just a dry air blower.

Need to think about how much I care if the cardboard slides
have to be dismounted for cleaning.

Stage 3: material handling prep for going into whatever
scanning system (eg, remount slides?).

Stage 4: make the scan

Stage 5: data backup/archiving

Stage 6: post processing (what I've found to be my time suck)


Hope this helps,


-hh


  #9  
Old April 19th 17, 08:06 AM posted to rec.photo.digital
Sandman
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,393
Default Film scanners?

In article , -hh
wrote:

Set up the slide projector at home, with a dSLR on a tripod next
to it ... project, click, project, click ... this is a quick &
dirty way to get a halfway decent quality image quickly, which
is better than nothing.


Problem with this is of course that you are limited to the resolving power of
the slide projector lens, which usually is really crappy. Also, the
smoothness of the projector surface, which unless it's a movie-grade
projection screen usually is really poor.

--
Sandman
  #10  
Old April 19th 17, 12:34 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
-hh
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 644
Default Film scanners?

On Wednesday, April 19, 2017 at 3:06:58 AM UTC-4, Sandman wrote:
-hh wrote:

Set up the slide projector at home, with a dSLR on a tripod next
to it ... project, click, project, click ... this is a quick &
dirty way to get a halfway decent quality image quickly, which
is better than nothing.


Problem with this is of course that you are limited to the resolving power of
the slide projector lens, which usually is really crappy. Also, the
smoothness of the projector surface, which unless it's a movie-grade
projection screen usually is really poor.


Very true, which is why I referred to this approach as "quick & dirty"
as well as "halfway decent".

Point is simply that it is, however slight, still "better than nothing", and
gets there without a huge personal time/effort investment.


-hh
 




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