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Haze, uncoated lenses and B&W film.



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 17th 04, 02:41 AM
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Default Haze, uncoated lenses and B&W film.

I've been working with a camera in my collection that's got a whole
bunch of neat features. I noticed excessive film grain with the first
few test rolls. I then tried two other films and saw exactly the same
effect. This is color E6 film and the lenses are uncoated (pre-WWII)
and I haven't been using UV or haze filters. Now I'm thinking that what
I thought was grain is actually haze. But this haze is more extreme
that what I've seen with coated lenses. So here are my questions:

1) Are uncoated lenses more prone to haze problems?
2) Would using B&W film eliminate this problem? (I assume it would as
this is a high-end camera and I don't think the photogs of yesteryear
would have put up with this)
3) Believe it or not the camera has provision for behind the lens
filters. Would behind the lens filters perform better than placing them
up front, and consider that these are uncoated lenses?
Thanks for any answers or even informed speculation.

  #7  
Old September 17th 04, 11:19 AM
RolandRB
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wrote in message ...
I've been working with a camera in my collection that's got a whole
bunch of neat features. I noticed excessive film grain with the first
few test rolls. I then tried two other films and saw exactly the same
effect. This is color E6 film and the lenses are uncoated (pre-WWII)
and I haven't been using UV or haze filters. Now I'm thinking that what
I thought was grain is actually haze. But this haze is more extreme
that what I've seen with coated lenses. So here are my questions:


I don't know how you can mistake (presumably excessive) grain for haze
as in the first case you have excessive speckling and in the second
case you have a loss of contrast plus pehaps a loss of sharpness.

1) Are uncoated lenses more prone to haze problems?
2) Would using B&W film eliminate this problem? (I assume it would as
this is a high-end camera and I don't think the photogs of yesteryear
would have put up with this)
3) Believe it or not the camera has provision for behind the lens
filters. Would behind the lens filters perform better than placing them
up front, and consider that these are uncoated lenses?
Thanks for any answers or even informed speculation.


Open up the lens and look through it at a light. Is there obvious
haze? Perhaps the lens just needs a clean. If it is pre-WW2 then it
might clean up quite nicely, unless the fungus has got to it. In the
latter case then throw the lens away and maybe the camera with it if
the lens can not be replaced.

What model is it and what is the lens type?
  #8  
Old September 17th 04, 11:19 AM
RolandRB
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

wrote in message ...
I've been working with a camera in my collection that's got a whole
bunch of neat features. I noticed excessive film grain with the first
few test rolls. I then tried two other films and saw exactly the same
effect. This is color E6 film and the lenses are uncoated (pre-WWII)
and I haven't been using UV or haze filters. Now I'm thinking that what
I thought was grain is actually haze. But this haze is more extreme
that what I've seen with coated lenses. So here are my questions:


I don't know how you can mistake (presumably excessive) grain for haze
as in the first case you have excessive speckling and in the second
case you have a loss of contrast plus pehaps a loss of sharpness.

1) Are uncoated lenses more prone to haze problems?
2) Would using B&W film eliminate this problem? (I assume it would as
this is a high-end camera and I don't think the photogs of yesteryear
would have put up with this)
3) Believe it or not the camera has provision for behind the lens
filters. Would behind the lens filters perform better than placing them
up front, and consider that these are uncoated lenses?
Thanks for any answers or even informed speculation.


Open up the lens and look through it at a light. Is there obvious
haze? Perhaps the lens just needs a clean. If it is pre-WW2 then it
might clean up quite nicely, unless the fungus has got to it. In the
latter case then throw the lens away and maybe the camera with it if
the lens can not be replaced.

What model is it and what is the lens type?
 




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