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A newbie request help selecting digital camera



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 12th 09, 11:07 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
Kris Krieger
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 39
Default A newbie request help selecting digital camera

Hello!

I've been using a nice Minolta with Fuji ASA 100 film and a modest telephoto
lens. I've occasionalyl gotten some very decent nature photos, but have had
trouble getting the hnag of exposure times - and it costs more and more to
develop "experiments".

So I started think that it might be time for me to join the 21st century, and
go digital.

But to be honest, I'm totally bewildered by the myriad of choices, and the
huge expense of the cameras that look like what I might want! I was trying
to make my way through this site
http://www.the-digital-picture.com/R...al-SLR-Camera-
Reviews.aspx
but then thought, WHy don't I see whether tehre is a digital photo newsgroup
where I might be able to get some basic guidance.

So here I am.

WHat I want to do is get highly crisp true-color photos of natural subjects,
such as backlit grass, dragonflies, and the like, such as I've (sometimes)
been able to get using the above non-digital combination, BUT it'd be nice to
see the pic in advance, as can be done with digital cameras, and it'd be nice
to not have to pay so much for "experimental" film shots (esp since the shops
develop *everythign*, even the complete junk, since that's how they make
their money). I've been *hoping* to get a digital camera that would use my
Minolta lens and my Nikkon 55mm lens.

What I definitely do not want is an "automated" thing that takes away my
control over the photo, focuses eveythign in the center (as opposed to where
*I* want the focus to be), and other such interferences. So I've been leery
of "power shot" types or other types that sound like they are merely for
taking nice little snapshots (as opposed to decent-quality photographs).

At the same time, I cannot pay hundreds upon hundreds of dollars...so price
is a consideration

Oh yeah, I also am not concerned about it being able to take video, tho' I
wouldn't reject that ability, either


So, given all of that, could some kind soul perhaps direct this totally-
confused newbie to a good starting place to look?

Many Thanks in Advance!

Kris K.
  #2  
Old June 12th 09, 11:16 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
Charles[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 695
Default A newbie request help selecting digital camera


http://porters.com/LENS%20COMPATIBILE.pdf


  #3  
Old June 12th 09, 11:27 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
Kris Krieger
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 39
Default A newbie request help selecting digital camera

"Charles" wrote in news:h0uk4r$iem$1
@news.eternal-september.org:


http://porters.com/LENS%20COMPATIBILE.pdf




Wow, That was fast! I'm thinking that mylenses won't do - they're early-
1970's vintage. So it's good to know that I can't jsut buy a camera body -
that will save me some grief

I saved that document for future reference. I'm also opening the website in
a new window

THanks!

- Kris
  #4  
Old June 12th 09, 11:37 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
Charles[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 695
Default A newbie request help selecting digital camera


"Kris Krieger" wrote in message
...
"Charles" wrote in news:h0uk4r$iem$1
@news.eternal-september.org:


http://porters.com/LENS%20COMPATIBILE.pdf




Wow, That was fast! I'm thinking that mylenses won't do - they're early-
1970's vintage. So it's good to know that I can't jsut buy a camera
body -
that will save me some grief

I saved that document for future reference. I'm also opening the website
in
a new window

THanks!


Kris, you are most welcome. It's always a good idea to build on what we
already have and what we already know.

As to modern digital SLRs, they are mostly all very good. I don't think you
can go very far wrong.


  #5  
Old June 12th 09, 11:58 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
ASAAR
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,057
Default A newbie request help selecting digital camera

On Fri, 12 Jun 2009 17:07:29 -0500, Kris Krieger wrote:

I've been using a nice Minolta with Fuji ASA 100 film and a modest telephoto
lens. I've occasionalyl gotten some very decent nature photos, but have had
trouble getting the hnag of exposure times - and it costs more and more to
develop "experiments".

So I started think that it might be time for me to join the 21st century, and
go digital.

But to be honest, I'm totally bewildered by the myriad of choices, and the
huge expense of the cameras that look like what I might want! I was trying
to make my way through this site
http://www.the-digital-picture.com/R...al-SLR-Camera-
Reviews.aspx
but then thought, WHy don't I see whether tehre is a digital photo newsgroup
where I might be able to get some basic guidance.

So here I am.

WHat I want to do is get highly crisp true-color photos of natural subjects,
such as backlit grass, dragonflies, and the like, such as I've (sometimes)
been able to get using the above non-digital combination, BUT it'd be nice to
see the pic in advance, as can be done with digital cameras, and it'd be nice
to not have to pay so much for "experimental" film shots (esp since the shops
develop *everythign*, even the complete junk, since that's how they make
their money). I've been *hoping* to get a digital camera that would use my
Minolta lens and my Nikkon 55mm lens.


For lens compatibility look to Nikon DSLRs for your 55mm Nikkor
and Sony DSLRs for your Minolta lenses. Some here that are more
familiar with Sony's products and may be able to say whether some
lenses are more compatible than others. For the Nikkor, if it's an
AutoFocus lens, you'll probably want to avoid the cheapest bodies
since they don't have the in-body motor that is needed to focus
screw-driven AF lenses. This means that you'd want to avoid the new
D5000 as well as the very small D40, D40x and D60. Some older DSLRs
that are still available as manufacturer refurbs are the D50, D70,
D80 and D200. Some stores may still have a few new D200s, otherwise
your choice would be between a new D90 or D300.

By the way, all of these cameras have sensors smaller than a 35mm
film frame (usually called DX sensors), so the images you'd get with
55mm Nikkor will appear magnified, more like what you'd get with an
82.5mm focal length lens on a film camera. Same for the Minolta
lenses. The multiplier for Nikkor lenses is 1.5, and 1.6 for
Canon's lenses. I don't know what the multiplier is for Sony DSLRs,
but it's sure to be in this vicinity. Sony's A900 and Nikon's D3,
D700 and D3x are exceptions, all having large sensors (called FX or
Full Frame) that are the same size as your film SLRs, so there won't
be any need for a focal length multiplier. Unfortunately, these
tend to be much more expensive DSLR bodies. They're good for wide
angle photography, such as landscapes, because a 20mm lens on an FX
DSLR is very wide, what you'd expect from a 20mm lens on a film SLR.
But it would be only slightly wide on a DX DSLR (30mm on Nikon, 32mm
on Canon). On the other hand, a 300mm lens that might be desirable
for some nature/wildlife photography would perform like a 450mm or
480mm lens on a DX DSLR, which is why most wildlife photographers
prefer using DX DSLRs.


What I definitely do not want is an "automated" thing that takes away my
control over the photo, focuses eveythign in the center (as opposed to where
*I* want the focus to be), and other such interferences. So I've been leery
of "power shot" types or other types that sound like they are merely for
taking nice little snapshots (as opposed to decent-quality photographs).


That shouldn't be a problem with Nikon's DSLRs, even the cheapest.
It's probably also true for Sony's DSLRs, but I'm not the person to
ask about them.


At the same time, I cannot pay hundreds upon hundreds of dollars...so price
is a consideration

Oh yeah, I also am not concerned about it being able to take video, tho' I
wouldn't reject that ability, either


Reject it. DSLR videos can be ok if you use a tripod, but for
following moving subjects you'd be much better off with videos taken
with much cheaper P&S cameras.


So, given all of that, could some kind soul perhaps direct this totally-
confused newbie to a good starting place to look?


Here, for replies that others will provide, and DPReview's forums
might be a better place. See

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/

and check out these forums:
Beginners Questions
Nikon D90 - D40 / D5000
Nikon D300 - D100
Nikon SLR Lens Talk
Sony SLR Talk

as well as any others that may pique your interest. You don't
have to register unless you want to post questions or replies. DPR
also has very good full reviews of many DSLRs, and while they may
seem overwhelming to some readers at first (there may be more than
30 pages per camera), with time and osmosis they'll eventually
become very readable. Until then, don't miss the Conclusions page
that's near the end of each "full" review.

  #6  
Old June 13th 09, 01:08 AM posted to rec.photo.digital
Ignoring the dSLR-Trolls
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default A newbie request help selecting digital camera

On Fri, 12 Jun 2009 17:07:29 -0500, Kris Krieger wrote:

Hello!

I've been using a nice Minolta with Fuji ASA 100 film and a modest telephoto
lens. I've occasionalyl gotten some very decent nature photos, but have had
trouble getting the hnag of exposure times - and it costs more and more to
develop "experiments".

So I started think that it might be time for me to join the 21st century, and
go digital.

But to be honest, I'm totally bewildered by the myriad of choices, and the
huge expense of the cameras that look like what I might want! I was trying
to make my way through this site
http://www.the-digital-picture.com/R...al-SLR-Camera-
Reviews.aspx
but then thought, WHy don't I see whether tehre is a digital photo newsgroup
where I might be able to get some basic guidance.

So here I am.

WHat I want to do is get highly crisp true-color photos of natural subjects,
such as backlit grass, dragonflies, and the like, such as I've (sometimes)
been able to get using the above non-digital combination, BUT it'd be nice to
see the pic in advance, as can be done with digital cameras, and it'd be nice
to not have to pay so much for "experimental" film shots (esp since the shops
develop *everythign*, even the complete junk, since that's how they make
their money). I've been *hoping* to get a digital camera that would use my
Minolta lens and my Nikkon 55mm lens.

What I definitely do not want is an "automated" thing that takes away my
control over the photo, focuses eveythign in the center (as opposed to where
*I* want the focus to be), and other such interferences. So I've been leery
of "power shot" types or other types that sound like they are merely for
taking nice little snapshots (as opposed to decent-quality photographs).

At the same time, I cannot pay hundreds upon hundreds of dollars...so price
is a consideration

Oh yeah, I also am not concerned about it being able to take video, tho' I
wouldn't reject that ability, either


So, given all of that, could some kind soul perhaps direct this totally-
confused newbie to a good starting place to look?

Many Thanks in Advance!

Kris K.



Go with any of the excellent super-zoom P&S cameras (and ditch your old
lenses that won't even have full functionality on any of the newer
cameras). You can do all that you want with any of the super-zoom P&S
models. Full manual control and much more. You'll wonder why you've waited
so long. The convenience and adaptability of an all-in-one camera can't be
beat. No more missed shots and you'll get your live-preview of exactly what
you'll get on your final image at all times. (Not to mention high-quality
video recording too.) Don't listen to the throngs dSLR-pushing trolls. They
know not of what they speak.

Here's a good example of how an inexpensive P&S super-zoom camera beats a
new dSLR hands-down in resolution and chromatic aberration problems.

http://www.cameralabs.com/reviews/Ca..._results.shtml

In order to get the same image quality and zoom-reach (of the P&S camera)
from that dSLR it would cost over $6,500 in lenses and an extra 20 lbs. in
weight for the dSLR. This would include the cumbersome and heavy tripod to
be able to use the longer-focal length lenses with it. I did the math.

Since you've been shooting with ASA100 film all this time you won't even
have need for ISO's (ASAs) above 400. That's the one and only thing that
dSLRs are better at, at the great cost of their crippling smaller apertures
on all longer dSLR lenses. The larger apertures at longer zoom settings on
P&S cameras easily makes up for a dSLR's piddly higher ISO benefit.

For your macro-photography needs there is no better choice than a P&S
camera. You will finally be able to do hand-held available light macro
photography without having to use a tripod and flash to get enough
depth-of-field due to a stopped-down SLR lens. You also won't have to worry
about all your photos being ruined because you got dust on your dSLR's
sensor while out shooting and fumbling around swapping cumbersome lenses.

This is the 21st century, it's time to ditch the outmoded concepts of the
1900's. The same way we ditched the wet-plates, flash-powders, and
horse-drawn covered-wagon darkrooms before. It might take you a while to
adapt and learn to use these newer cameras effectively but in the end the
convenience and adaptability of them far outweighs what you've been doing
all along.

If you want even more control and features than any dSLR ever made, or will
ever be made, check out any of the Canon P&S models supported by the free
CHDK software add-on for them.

http://chdk.wikia.com/wiki/Main_Page

See this camera-features chart http://chdk.wikia.com/wiki/CameraFeatures
for what new capabilities each model might have, beyond what was originally
provided by the manufacturer.

Some models support manual shutter speeds from 2048 seconds (and even
longer in the extended "Factor" shutter-speed mode) to a record-breaking
1/40,000th second. With 100% accurate flash sync up to the highest speed.
You're no longer limited and crippled by a focal-plane shutter's maximum
1/250th second X-Sync speed when trying to use flash to fill shadows in
harsh sunlit conditions. They also have built-in motion detection for
nature and lightning photography. Their shutter response times are fast
enough to catch a lightning strike triggered from the pre-strike
step-leader of a lightning event. One person even doing hand-held lightning
photography during daylight this way. Using short shutter speeds and the
built-in motion detection to trigger the shutter at the right time. That's
never been done before in the history of photography. No need for a tripod
and keeping the shutter open hoping for a random lightning event. Just hold
the camera in the direction of the storm, composing your shot. The camera
snaps off a frame only when there's an actual strike.

Some of the more amazing uses of CHDK cameras have been lofting them in
weather balloons into the upper atmosphere, running an internal
intervalometer script to record the whole event. A dSLR's lenses and
archaic mirror contraptions would freeze-up solid at those temperatures.
Some images taken from so high that you can see the curvature of the earth.
Kite-aerial photography is another popular use for CHDK cameras that run
internal scripts.

If still in doubt about what you can do with any of the 45+ models of CHDK
equipped P&S cameras just browse a few pages of the 9,500+ "World's Best
CHDK Photos" at this link:

http://fiveprime.org/hivemind/Tags/chdk

It'll change everything that you ever thought or knew about "power shot
type" P&S cameras.

  #7  
Old June 13th 09, 01:18 AM posted to rec.photo.digital
Tony Cooper
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,748
Default A newbie request help selecting digital camera

On Fri, 12 Jun 2009 17:07:29 -0500, Kris Krieger
wrote:

What I definitely do not want is an "automated" thing that takes away my
control over the photo, focuses eveythign in the center (as opposed to where
*I* want the focus to be), and other such interferences. So I've been leery
of "power shot" types or other types that sound like they are merely for
taking nice little snapshots (as opposed to decent-quality photographs).


I know of no digital camera that focuses everything in the center. I
have a low-end point-and-shoot that my wife uses and a dslr that I
use. In both cases there is one or more focusing brackets in view.
In both cases, if you focus on an object using in the focusing
bracket, depress the shutter button half-way, and move the camera, the
camera will retain the focus as set. In other words, you can focus
using the center focus bracket and then move the camera to have what
is in focus in the edge of your image.

My dslr can be set to full manual. As far as I know, all dslrs are
the same.

--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
  #8  
Old June 13th 09, 01:59 AM posted to rec.photo.digital
Jürgen Exner
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,579
Default A newbie request help selecting digital camera

Matt Ion wrote:
Kris Krieger wrote:

So, given all of that, could some kind soul perhaps direct this totally-
confused newbie to a good starting place to look?

[...]

users over another... but at the end of the day, all of these cameras
will give you great results and serve you well for years, and so it's
important to have a camera that *YOU* enjoy using. If it feels awkward
for *YOU* to handle, or the menus are confusing for *YOU* to navigate,
or the controls are poorly-placed for *YOUR* hands, then you won't enjoy
using it, and the camera is much more likely to simply sit on a shelf
collecting dust, where all those arguments become moot.


100% ACK.
This advise above it the most important factor. If the camera doesn't
feel right for *YOU* then it is the wrong camera for you.

jue
  #9  
Old June 13th 09, 02:08 AM posted to rec.photo.digital
Jürgen Exner
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,579
Default A newbie request help selecting digital camera

Ignoring the dSLR-Trolls wrote:
On Fri, 12 Jun 2009 17:07:29 -0500, Kris Krieger wrote:


Dear Ignoring

Would you mind keeping to a single ID? It becomes tiresome to killfile
you over and over again.

[...]
So, given all of that, could some kind soul perhaps direct this totally-
confused newbie to a good starting place to look?


Go with any of the excellent super-zoom P&S cameras (and ditch your old
lenses that won't even have full functionality on any of the newer
cameras).


Most old lenses will be fully functional on most newer cameras. Famous
exceptions are e.g. non-AF-S lenses on entry-level Nikons or FD lenses
on Canon EOS bodies.

You can do all that you want with any of the super-zoom P&S
models.

[Rest of standard boiler plate drivel snipped]

Yeah right, keep on dreaming.

jue
  #10  
Old June 13th 09, 02:10 AM posted to rec.photo.digital
Jürgen Exner
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,579
Default A newbie request help selecting digital camera

tony cooper wrote:
On Fri, 12 Jun 2009 17:07:29 -0500, Kris Krieger
wrote:

What I definitely do not want is an "automated" thing that takes away my
control over the photo, focuses eveythign in the center (as opposed to where
*I* want the focus to be), and other such interferences. So I've been leery
of "power shot" types or other types that sound like they are merely for
taking nice little snapshots (as opposed to decent-quality photographs).


I know of no digital camera that focuses everything in the center. I
have a low-end point-and-shoot that my wife uses and a dslr that I
use. In both cases there is one or more focusing brackets in view.
In both cases, if you focus on an object using in the focusing
bracket, depress the shutter button half-way, and move the camera, the
camera will retain the focus as set. In other words, you can focus
using the center focus bracket and then move the camera to have what
is in focus in the edge of your image.


Furthermore most (all?) dSLRs allow you to select which focus area(s)
should be taken into consideration by the camera. If you know that your
subject will be in the upper right corner for the next 20 shots, then
set the focus to the upper right corner.

jue
 




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