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Will we always be able to buy film?



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 27th 04, 12:26 PM
Phil Glaser
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Default Will we always be able to buy film?

Some of this may be old news to some of you, but I just found this
story about Kodak reducing manufacturing capacity and laying of 15,000
employees: http://www.usatoday.com/tech/techinv...dak-cuts_x.htm
The story poses some interesting questioins about Kodak's future

Meanwhile, NPR did a piece this weekend on the "digital revolution":
http://www.npr.org/features/feature.php?wfId=1616953.

The prologue to the NPR story on their website says that ". . .
Eastman Kodak will stop selling photographic film . . ." This
statement is obviously an exageration and misrepresentation of the
trend in the market and at Kodak, but it does get me thinking about
what it will be like over the next decade or two as digital eclipses
film as the medium of choice for most amatures and for many areas of
professional photography. The economics of it are such that, as
digital equipment prices fall, film will become the more expensive
option even at today's equipment and material prices. Digital probably
already is the least expensive in a certain range of quality (I mean:
if you can do with low resolution and don't need to do a lot of
creative manipulation [requiring photoshop], digital is definitely
already cheaper).

So how will it be to procure film in the next 10-20 years? Can we
imagine a day where Kodak sells little if any film? What about
companies like Ilford and Agfa and Fuji? Sure, they will stay in
business because the demand for film will probably always be
sufficient to make it a niche market. But will reduction in demand
lead to an increase in prices for film, so that, even with cheap
darkroom equipment and film cameras around, film could become a lot
more expensive than digital? Will there be fewer choices? Will film
manufacturers continue to innovate? Or will it be the opposite: will
film innovate even more to compete with digital?. . .

--phil
  #2  
Old January 27th 04, 12:41 PM
Dennis O'Connor
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Default Will we always be able to buy film?

This has been deiscussed to death in recent weeks... Google the aarchives...
denny
"Phil Glaser" wrote in message
om...
Some of this may be old news to some of you, but I just found this
story about Kodak reducing manufacturing capacity and laying of 15,000
employees:

http://www.usatoday.com/tech/techinv...dak-cuts_x.htm
The story poses some interesting questioins about Kodak's future

Meanwhile, NPR did a piece this weekend on the "digital revolution":
http://www.npr.org/features/feature.php?wfId=1616953.

The prologue to the NPR story on their website says that ". . .
Eastman Kodak will stop selling photographic film . . ." This
statement is obviously an exageration and misrepresentation of the
trend in the market and at Kodak, but it does get me thinking about
what it will be like over the next decade or two as digital eclipses
film as the medium of choice for most amatures and for many areas of
professional photography. The economics of it are such that, as
digital equipment prices fall, film will become the more expensive
option even at today's equipment and material prices. Digital probably
already is the least expensive in a certain range of quality (I mean:
if you can do with low resolution and don't need to do a lot of
creative manipulation [requiring photoshop], digital is definitely
already cheaper).

So how will it be to procure film in the next 10-20 years? Can we
imagine a day where Kodak sells little if any film? What about
companies like Ilford and Agfa and Fuji? Sure, they will stay in
business because the demand for film will probably always be
sufficient to make it a niche market. But will reduction in demand
lead to an increase in prices for film, so that, even with cheap
darkroom equipment and film cameras around, film could become a lot
more expensive than digital? Will there be fewer choices? Will film
manufacturers continue to innovate? Or will it be the opposite: will
film innovate even more to compete with digital?. . .

--phil



  #3  
Old January 27th 04, 01:54 PM
Mark Cudworth
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Posts: n/a
Default Will we always be able to buy film?

(Phil Glaser) writes:

So how will it be to procure film in the next 10-20 years?


If people are willing to buy it, film will always be sold. Black powder
muskets are still available new, and they've been "obsolete" for over a
century:

http://arms2armor.com/blkpwdr/longarms.htm

That's right, Civil War muskets listed as "New in box." Film may not be
available in your home town, but it will be available.

--
Mark Cudworth
  #5  
Old January 27th 04, 10:19 PM
Michael Scarpitti
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Default Will we always be able to buy film?

YES!

Billions of rolls are sold each year! Million of 35mm cameras exist!

YES! YES! YES!
  #6  
Old January 27th 04, 10:40 PM
Frank Pittel
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Default Will we always be able to buy film?

The reality of the world is that the film, chemistry, paper, etc
makers are for profit companies. As long as there is a profit to be
made there will be someone who'll make it. I do believe that the selection
will decrease as the market for it contract.

Phil Glaser wrote:
: Some of this may be old news to some of you, but I just found this
: story about Kodak reducing manufacturing capacity and laying of 15,000
: employees: http://www.usatoday.com/tech/techinv...dak-cuts_x.htm
: The story poses some interesting questioins about Kodak's future

: Meanwhile, NPR did a piece this weekend on the "digital revolution":
: http://www.npr.org/features/feature.php?wfId=1616953.

: The prologue to the NPR story on their website says that ". . .
: Eastman Kodak will stop selling photographic film . . ." This
: statement is obviously an exageration and misrepresentation of the
: trend in the market and at Kodak, but it does get me thinking about
: what it will be like over the next decade or two as digital eclipses
: film as the medium of choice for most amatures and for many areas of
: professional photography. The economics of it are such that, as
: digital equipment prices fall, film will become the more expensive
: option even at today's equipment and material prices. Digital probably
: already is the least expensive in a certain range of quality (I mean:
: if you can do with low resolution and don't need to do a lot of
: creative manipulation [requiring photoshop], digital is definitely
: already cheaper).

: So how will it be to procure film in the next 10-20 years? Can we
: imagine a day where Kodak sells little if any film? What about
: companies like Ilford and Agfa and Fuji? Sure, they will stay in
: business because the demand for film will probably always be
: sufficient to make it a niche market. But will reduction in demand
: lead to an increase in prices for film, so that, even with cheap
: darkroom equipment and film cameras around, film could become a lot
: more expensive than digital? Will there be fewer choices? Will film
: manufacturers continue to innovate? Or will it be the opposite: will
: film innovate even more to compete with digital?. . .

: --phil

--




Keep working millions on welfare depend on you
-------------------

  #7  
Old January 27th 04, 11:01 PM
jjs
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Posts: n/a
Default Will we always be able to buy film?


"Frank Pittel" wrote in message
...
The reality of the world is that the film, chemistry, paper, etc
makers are for profit companies. As long as there is a profit to be
made there will be someone who'll make it. I do believe that the selection
will decrease as the market for it contract.


Somebody will always pipe up with this "the reality is economics" bullsiht.
Just what good does it to to state the obvious? ... ah, rather like this
message is obvious.


  #8  
Old January 28th 04, 12:25 AM
Dan Dunphy
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Default Will we always be able to buy film?

I don't unsderstand what this has to do with photography, but these
are NOT original muskets. They are modern replicas, predominately sold
to re-enactors.
Taylors is a currently operating distributer, not a civil war vintage
manufacturer.
Dan

On Tue, 27 Jan 2004 07:54:06 -0600, lid (Mark
Cudworth) wrote:

(Phil Glaser) writes:

So how will it be to procure film in the next 10-20 years?


If people are willing to buy it, film will always be sold. Black powder
muskets are still available new, and they've been "obsolete" for over a
century:

http://arms2armor.com/blkpwdr/longarms.htm

That's right, Civil War muskets listed as "New in box." Film may not be
available in your home town, but it will be available.


Colorado Springs, CO
My advice may be worth what you paid for it.
  #9  
Old January 28th 04, 12:54 AM
jjs
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Posts: n/a
Default Will we always be able to buy film?

In article , Frank Pittel
wrote:

: Somebody will always pipe up with this "the reality is economics" bullsiht.
: Just what good does it to to state the obvious? ... ah, rather like this
: message is obvious.

It's an accurate question to a question that gets asked a lot these

days. Would
you prefer an answer like "YES, YES, YES


No. I just get tired of the morons who think that everything is answered
with the cliche regarding demand-side economics. So it is true - so
what? It's stupid, moronic and too fcuking obvious, as obvious as
counting your fingers, so TELL ME SOMETHING I DONT' KNOW or just shut the
fcuk up.
  #10  
Old January 28th 04, 01:33 AM
Gregory W Blank
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Posts: n/a
Default Will we always be able to buy film?

In article ,
Dan Dunphy wrote:

I don't unsderstand what this has to do with photography, but these
are NOT original muskets. They are modern replicas, predominately sold
to re-enactors.
Taylors is a currently operating distributer, not a civil war vintage
manufacturer.
Dan


The only difference is probably that they are not antiques,
you can probably still load them with black powder and musket
balls just the same and shoot your tail off with them just the same,////
likewise with old or new cameras and new or old film provided the film is
good and has the same specs. I imagine someone somewhere will perfect
all the requirements of making film base for all those knuckle walkers
in the 29th century that won't give up their speed graphics or Leicas ;-)
--
LF website http://members.bellatlantic.net/~gblank
 




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