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how to put the border around a headshot?



 
 
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  #11  
Old December 23rd 03, 04:06 PM
Millenium
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Default how to put the border around a headshot?

here is what i want to do to my headshot

http://www.graphicreproductions.com/4.htm

any ideas of how to accomplish it. with photoshop 8?
  #12  
Old December 23rd 03, 08:41 PM
J C
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Default how to put the border around a headshot?

On 23 Dec 2003 08:01:11 -0800, (Millenium)
wrote:

here is an example of the frame i want to put around my headshot.. any
idea of how to do it with photoshop 8?

http://www.graphicreproductions.com/4.htm
thankds


There are several professional level, commercial PS plugins that have
100's or 1000's of frames. That looks like it might have been created
from one of those.

Alternatively, you could create the frame yourself. It is not that
hard. Let's see:

1. Create a new layer
2. Fill with black
3. Select center area, and delete it
4. Rough up the remaining edge area (by selecting/deleting sections,
adding white patches, etc)
5. Run some filters on the remaining border to rough it up some more.

Well... you get the idea.


-- JC
  #14  
Old December 25th 03, 02:47 AM
zeitgeist
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Default how to put the border around a headshot?


here is what i want to do to my headshot

http://www.graphicreproductions.com/4.htm

any ideas of how to accomplish it. with photoshop 8?



Most likely they bought a CD full of borders, that looks like what they used
to call a filed out negative carrier frame, a photog would literally take a
metal file to enlarge the image area around the negative, way out to the
edge of the sprockets, it was an arty look.

Now you can buy CD's full of various royalty free images of borders, that, a
4x5 type neg edge, various polaroid edge effects.

You can make your own, to get a deckle edge take a piece of paper with a
deckle edge and scan it, copy and rotate so you have four sides,

frankly I think you should keep it simple, if you were to talk to casting
agents, ad art directors, you'll find that they find such effects
distracting, even annoying.

what I sometimes do is make a dup layer, hit layer style and add a beveled
edge with inner or outer glow, that will give you a thin clean edge with no
attention getting distractions.

Its really rare that a fancy matting, underlay, overlay, pin stripe tape,
and arty borders actually improves an image. In PPA print competition you
will see it on a lot of prints, but any time it becomes as noticable as the
subject itself then the whole thing takes a hit in the score, it smells of
flop sweat, a desperation move to rescue a mediocre image that the submitter
had already spent a wad to make a print and retouch. It just doesn't sing,
so they start putting mattes and color tape edges hoping something might
fly.

Photoshop 8? geez, I'm still puttering around with 6.

here's some ideas...

if your target is an 8x10, then scale your image for, say 7 inches wide,
make another copy of the image that is 7.5 wide, now run a filter or two,
streak it, blur it, dapple, grain, swirl, whatever. hit image adjust and
curves or brightness and make it a step or two darker (or brighter) and drag
it on to the final canvas, then drop your main image, now you have a custom
border keyed to your image.



  #15  
Old December 29th 03, 09:30 AM
M77
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Default how to put the border around a headshot?


"Millenium" wrote in message
om...
here is an example of the frame i want to put around my headshot.. any
idea of how to do it with photoshop 8?

http://www.graphicreproductions.com/4.htm
thankds


man, you other people are no help at all.



you need to size down your image to the size you want it. find a 'sloppy'
border like the one in the sample (you'll have to do your own searching for
those). increase the white canvas to 8x10, then drag over the black sloppy
and line it up (use 'scale'). add the text to the bottom and you're done.
for a genuine headshot, you will want the white canvas on the bottom to be
bigger than on the top (see your sample). reverse borders also look cool.
that is when you have a white sloppy and black large canvas around it.

and by the way, resolution on screen is rated in PIXELS per inch (ppi), not
dots (dpi), therefore you want your resolution set to 300ppi.


  #16  
Old December 29th 03, 07:58 PM
stan
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Default how to put the border around a headshot?



M77 wrote:

"Millenium" wrote in message
om...
here is an example of the frame i want to put around my headshot.. any
idea of how to do it with photoshop 8?

http://www.graphicreproductions.com/4.htm
thankds


man, you other people are no help at all.

you need to size down your image to the size you want it. find a 'sloppy'
border like the one in the sample (you'll have to do your own searching for
those). increase the white canvas to 8x10, then drag over the black sloppy
and line it up (use 'scale'). add the text to the bottom and you're done.
for a genuine headshot, you will want the white canvas on the bottom to be
bigger than on the top (see your sample). reverse borders also look cool.
that is when you have a white sloppy and black large canvas around it.

and by the way, resolution on screen is rated in PIXELS per inch (ppi), not
dots (dpi), therefore you want your resolution set to 300ppi.


Use the rectangular marquee to form the border inverse to capture border only
background fill white puts in the white border use the lasso tool to make the
sides of each of the "filed frames" after you have what you want fill these
with black do it on all 4 sides. You can use the lasso tool to make any other
interesting areas around the print. You can do this in PS and don't need to go
to second party sources. It isn't that hard. I think Adobe has a tutorial on
making a "ripped edge effect" that can be used for making the black border. If
any of this wasn't clear e-mail me. My address is functional. I would have
responded earlier but life has been hard lately
Peace
Stan
Visual Arts Photography

  #17  
Old December 30th 03, 05:24 AM
J C
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Default how to put the border around a headshot?

On Mon, 29 Dec 2003 01:30:33 -0800, "M77" wrote:
hicreproductions.com/4.htm


man, you other people are no help at all.


I hope you're kidding about that, cause several answers above are much
clearer than the one you provided.


and by the way, resolution on screen is rated in PIXELS per inch (ppi), not
dots (dpi), therefore you want your resolution set to 300ppi.


I'd ignore that statement. It is illogical as the two statements do
not belong in the same sentence. Just because you've added a
"therefore" does not make it true.

And I'll tell you why: the resolution of the monitor is usually about
72 to 96 ppi (divide the resolution you're running your monitor at by
the monitor's image area and you'll see).

So 300 ppi for a digital image has nothing to do with what the monitor
is displaying (unless you're designing web pages).

There's a much, much deeper reason for using 300 ppi for digital
images.


-- JC
  #18  
Old December 30th 03, 06:05 AM
stan
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Posts: n/a
Default how to put the border around a headshot?

Hey J C what is the "deeper" reason for the 300 ppi for digital? I'm seriously
behind the learning curve. Any help would be appreciated
Stan
Visual Arts Photography


J C wrote:

On Mon, 29 Dec 2003 01:30:33 -0800, "M77" wrote:
hicreproductions.com/4.htm


man, you other people are no help at all.


I hope you're kidding about that, cause several answers above are much
clearer than the one you provided.


and by the way, resolution on screen is rated in PIXELS per inch (ppi), not
dots (dpi), therefore you want your resolution set to 300ppi.


I'd ignore that statement. It is illogical as the two statements do
not belong in the same sentence. Just because you've added a
"therefore" does not make it true.

And I'll tell you why: the resolution of the monitor is usually about
72 to 96 ppi (divide the resolution you're running your monitor at by
the monitor's image area and you'll see).

So 300 ppi for a digital image has nothing to do with what the monitor
is displaying (unless you're designing web pages).

There's a much, much deeper reason for using 300 ppi for digital
images.

-- JC


  #20  
Old December 30th 03, 06:15 PM
J C
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Posts: n/a
Default how to put the border around a headshot?

On Tue, 30 Dec 2003 01:16:36 -0700, Marc 182
wrote:



You shouldn't top-post, that's for email. The effective resolution of
photo paper is around 200-250 ppi. By keeping the resolution of your
digital images above 300 ppi you ensure that no pixilation will be
detectable on your final output.

Marc


For digital printing on an inkjet or laser printer connected to a
computer the resolution recommendations have little to do with the
paper. It has everything to do with the print engines used by output
devices. And in fact, for inkjet printing generally a 150 ppi image is
more than enough for a photographic output

With real printing, on a printing press, the paper does play a small
role (because of dot gain, which is explained last).

As a simple example, lets take a one color laser printer and a one
color TIF file at 300 dpi (the explanation for inkjet printing is a
bit more complex).

Also, and this is very important, lets start with the concept that no
printer on the face of the planet prints a one-to-one correspondence
between the information in the digital file and the output device. To
put it simply the print engines of all output device process the image
into something that it can print.

Now this gets complex... In order to output that one color digital
file on a one color laser printer the print engine must interpret the
colors. The digital file can contain 256 colors of grey, but a laser
printer has only one color of toner (black). Therefore to simulate the
grey scale image the laser printer must break it down into halftone
dots, the size of these dots then determines the grey value that the
eye perceives. Take a look at a laser print out of a digital image and
you'll see the dots.

Now further, a laser printer capable of 600 or 1200 dpi printing does
not actually print 600 or 1200 individual dots that can be discerned
in the printed halftone, though the dots that do show up on paper are
composed of several toner dots joined together.

The reason that the RIP (or "raster image processor") in the printer
restricts its halftone line screen output is because a higher output
would require much more processing time.

So, instead the laser printer spits out a halftone with a maximum of
approximately 127 halftone line screen (also known as lpi, lines per
inch) [And note here that even though the print driver says the laser
is capable of a 150 or 200 line screen for halftones it is NOT.]

So what does all this processing mean... Well the printer's RIP
samples the image information and creates an appropriate halfone dot.
Since there is not a one-to-one correspondence between the colors in
the image and the resulting halftone dots, the RIP samples image
information ("pixels" in the image) and determines the size of the
halftone dot. The finer the resolution of the starting image (within
limits) the better the halftone output. Lower resolution images will
look fuzzy because of this sampling process.

AND NOW to answer why a 300 dpi image is a standard... because in high
quality printing (on a printing press) photographs will be output at
anywhere from 133 lines per inch to 200 lines per inch -- 133 is used
in most magazines, 150 used in technical publications (medical xrays
for example) and sometimes 200 in art books (and many times art books
will be printed in duotone, but I'll not confuse you here and just
leave that at that).

So in the 300 image resolution printed with a 150 line halftone, this
means that 4 image "pixels" will be converted into one halftone dot
(but the raster image processor also considers other surrounding
pixels in the process as well) and this resolution gets a very sharp
image for a printing press.

If you want to test this out then try this: Create an image that is
half white and half 100% black. Now create different resolutions of
this file and print this on your laser printer using different
halftone line screens. Then look closely at the border area between
black and white. The lower resolution images printed with lower
halftone line screen values will have more indistinct (aka fuzzy)
borders, which will make the image look out of focus.

However once you reach about 127 lines per inch in the halftone,
you've not reached the compromise point between the size of the
halftone dot and the size of the lasers toner splatter -- there's
unwanted toner dots in the white areas which degrade the image.
Similarly on a real printing press another effect occurs... the wet
ink spreads out because of the capillary action of the fibers in the
paper and this makes the halftone does slightly larger and thus the
image darker. There's a point at which making the halftone screen
smaller will not increase the image quality (neither black and white
nor color). [And FYI, because of this dot gain, the images produced
for most publications are tweaked so that their saturation when viewed
on screen looks washed out... which is done by "Adjusting... Curves"
in Photoshop.]

There's a lot that I've not covered and that I've simplified, but
that's basically how it works.


-- JC
 




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