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  #1  
Old October 20th 10, 12:05 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
bugbear
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Posts: 1,258
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Val Hallah wrote:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencete...asses-Sun.html


Are the Daily Mail paying you or something?

BugBear
  #2  
Old October 20th 10, 02:02 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
Martin Brown
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Posts: 821
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On 20/10/2010 12:05, bugbear wrote:
Val Hallah wrote:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencete...asses-Sun.html


Are the Daily Mail paying you or something?


I am no fan of the Daily Mail but these are rather good photos.
Their photo editor does have an eye for this sort of thing.

Regards,
Martin Brown
  #3  
Old October 20th 10, 08:48 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
me[_5_]
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Posts: 578
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On Wed, 20 Oct 2010 11:54:26 -0700 (PDT), Twibil
wrote:

(C) Can you please find me one of those jobs where I get well paid for
alerting people to something in which they're already interested and
which costs them nothing? I need the work.


Send applications to RichA, isn't that obvious?
  #4  
Old October 20th 10, 10:03 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
Araan
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Posts: 4
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"Bruce" wrote in message
...
Are the Daily Mail paying you or something?


(A) The Daily Mail is only one newspaper. Therefore it's "Is", rather
than "Are".



In British English, the plural is correct as the Daily Mail is treated
as a company of many people. In American English, the singular is
used because the Daily Mail is treated as one corporate entity.

As Winston Churchill once said, the US and UK are two nations divided
by a common language. He would know - his mother was American.



Maybe due to evolution, in 500 years time it will be "iz d goog xpress payin
ya or sumit?"

Ever seen the movie "Idiocracy"? No offence to the poster, but it's an
interesting concept nevertheless.


  #5  
Old October 20th 10, 10:22 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
Araan
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Posts: 4
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"Bruce" wrote in message
...
(A) The Daily Mail is only one newspaper. Therefore it's "Is", rather
than "Are".


In British English, the plural is correct as the Daily Mail is treated
as a company of many people. In American English, the singular is
used because the Daily Mail is treated as one corporate entity.

As Winston Churchill once said, the US and UK are two nations divided
by a common language. He would know - his mother was American.



Maybe due to evolution, in 500 years time it will be "iz d goog xpress
payin
ya or sumit?"

Ever seen the movie "Idiocracy"? No offence to the poster, but it's an
interesting concept nevertheless.



I haven't seen it, but it's on my list of movies to see.


You've not missed much as far as a movie worth watching. Makes you think
though.


  #6  
Old October 21st 10, 12:04 AM posted to rec.photo.digital
Araan
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Posts: 4
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"Araan" wrote in message
...
"Bruce" wrote in message
...
(A) The Daily Mail is only one newspaper. Therefore it's "Is", rather
than "Are".


In British English, the plural is correct as the Daily Mail is treated
as a company of many people. In American English, the singular is
used because the Daily Mail is treated as one corporate entity.

As Winston Churchill once said, the US and UK are two nations divided
by a common language. He would know - his mother was American.


Maybe due to evolution, in 500 years time it will be "iz d goog xpress
payin
ya or sumit?"

Ever seen the movie "Idiocracy"? No offence to the poster, but it's an
interesting concept nevertheless.



I haven't seen it, but it's on my list of movies to see.


You've not missed much as far as a movie worth watching. Makes you think
though.


Ironically, I think the dumb arses at the top of the chain are dumber than
their workers.

  #7  
Old October 21st 10, 12:05 AM posted to rec.photo.digital
Kennedy McEwen
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Posts: 639
Default eclipse

In article , Bruce
writes
Twibil wrote:
On Oct 20, 4:05*am, bugbear wrote:

Are the Daily Mail paying you or something?


(A) The Daily Mail is only one newspaper. Therefore it's "Is", rather
than "Are".



In British English, the plural is correct as the Daily Mail is treated
as a company of many people. In American English, the singular is
used because the Daily Mail is treated as one corporate entity.

It is urban myth that this is British v's American English. It is just
good and bad English. When Lizzie Windsor talks about her Government
she does so singularly. Similarly other corporations.
eg.
http://www.number10.gov.uk/news/spee...10/05/queens-s
peech-2010-2-50580

"My Government will modernise the Royal Mail, in partnership with
employees, and will ensure *it* benefits from private sector capital and
disciplines."

"Proposals will be brought forward for a reformed second House that *is*
wholly or mainly elected on the basis of proportional representation."

"My Government ... *is* committed to a referendum on additional powers
for the National Assembly of Wales."

"My Government *looks* forward to an enhanced partnership with India."

"My Government *is* committed to spend nought point seven per cent of
gross national income in development aid from 2013."

However, note her use of the plural he
"My Government will introduce legislation to ensure that in future this
Parliament and the British people have *their* say on any proposed
transfer of powers to the European Union."
Because "the British people" are not a single entity.

As Winston Churchill once said, the US and UK are two nations divided
by a common language. He would know - his mother was American.

TRUMPS!
She would know better than Churchill - The Queen's English is Her
language - and She is not American!
;-)
--
Kennedy
Yes, Socrates himself is particularly missed;
A lovely little thinker, but a bugger when he's ****ed.
Python Philosophers (replace 'nospam' with 'kennedym' when replying)
  #8  
Old October 21st 10, 03:24 AM posted to rec.photo.digital
John McWilliams
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Posts: 6,945
Default eclipse

On 10/20/10 PDT 11:54 AM, Twibil wrote:
On Oct 20, 4:05 am, wrote:


Are the Daily Mail paying you or something?


(A) The Daily Mail is only one newspaper. Therefore it's "Is", rather
than "Are".


Unless you're in the land of the Great Unwashed!

(B) This is a photo/camera newsgroup. Posters can generally be assumed
to be interested in unusual photographs.

(C) Can you please find me one of those jobs where I get well paid for
alerting people to something in which they're already interested and
which costs them nothing? I need the work.


What wages will you require? Have wheels and a valid d/l??


--
john mcwilliams
  #9  
Old October 21st 10, 11:37 AM posted to rec.photo.digital
Kennedy McEwen
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Posts: 639
Default eclipse

In article , shiva das
writes
In article ,
Kennedy McEwen wrote:

In article , Bruce
writes
Twibil wrote:
On Oct 20, 4:05*am, bugbear wrote:

Are the Daily Mail paying you or something?

(A) The Daily Mail is only one newspaper. Therefore it's "Is", rather
than "Are".


In British English, the plural is correct as the Daily Mail is treated
as a company of many people. In American English, the singular is
used because the Daily Mail is treated as one corporate entity.

It is urban myth that this is British v's American English. It is just
good and bad English.


Bollox, to borrow a word from across the pond. Far from an Urban Myth it
is elementary linguistics: all languages change all the time, and logic
and language are not necessarily friends.


None of which I disagree with. There are many differences between US
and UK English: most, but not all, of which have arisen for the reasons
that you cite. However those reasons do not change the fact that this
particular issue is, contrary to urban legend, not a differentiation
between current US and UK forms of English, but between good and bad
English; good and bad grammar to be precise. The example of the recent
"Queen's Speech" clearly demonstrates that proper UK English follows
precisely the same rules as those ascribed by urban mythology as unique
to US English. There are plenty of older "Queen's Speeches" on the same
site I linked to that demonstrate this is not a recent change of Her
Majesty's language.

For example, referring to a gaggle of geese, "gaggle" is the collective
noun for a number of geese and addressed as singular whether in US or UK
English: "There is a gaggle at the gate.". "Geese" is plurality of
"goose" and addressed in both US and UK as plural: "The geese are in
their shed"; whilst "goose" is singular and referred to as such:
"Christmas is coming, the goose is getting fat.".

That is why HM The Queen refers to "My Government" in the singular
throughout all of her speeches: *it* is a single body; but refers to
"The British people" as plural: "people" is a plurality of persons and
British is merely a subset of that plurality, remaining plural. The
same rules apply whether using correct US or UK English.

Common misuse arises from ambiguities as to whether the subject is a
collective noun or a plurality of singular nouns. eg. "Chelsea is
playing away this weekend" is often used interchangeably with "Chelsea
are playing away this weekend" - depending on whether one considers
"Chelsea" to be the singular team or the plurality of Chelsea players.

"The Daily Mail" is singular, whether in US or UK English, and only the
great unwashed would refer to it as plural.

I trust that you will write to Her Majesty and request that she correct
the Americanisation of her own language that you accuse her, and her
predecessors, of propagating - according to your urban mythology.
--
Kennedy
Yes, Socrates himself is particularly missed;
A lovely little thinker, but a bugger when he's ****ed.
Python Philosophers (replace 'nospam' with 'kennedym' when replying)
  #10  
Old October 21st 10, 03:36 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
Allen[_3_]
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Posts: 649
Default eclipse

On 10/20/2010 11:46 PM, shiva das wrote:
In ,
Kennedy wrote:

In , Bruce
writes
wrote:
On Oct 20, 4:05 am, wrote:

Are the Daily Mail paying you or something?

(A) The Daily Mail is only one newspaper. Therefore it's "Is", rather
than "Are".


In British English, the plural is correct as the Daily Mail is treated
as a company of many people. In American English, the singular is
used because the Daily Mail is treated as one corporate entity.

It is urban myth that this is British v's American English. It is just
good and bad English.


Bollox, to borrow a word from across the pond. Far from an Urban Myth it
is elementary linguistics: all languages change all the time, and logic
and language are not necessarily friends. A double-negative in Russian
and other Slavic languages is a more emphatic negative, not a positive
as it is in English.

Think of the fact that English speakers have been in North America for
over 400 years, and that there was no rapid communications possible
between North America and the British Isles for most of that period.

Further, think about how many differences there are just within the
British Isles -- besides regional accents there are true dialects and
creoles in Scotland, Ireland, and Wales, and I'm not talking about the
various Celtic languages, just English.

Think of France and Haiti. Kriyol and French are mutually
unintelligible. American English, British English, Australian and New
Zealand English are technically variants of Modern English but it
doesn't take long for usage to make it hard for one group to understand
another.

The only static languages are dead languages: Ancient Greek; Latin;
Sanskrit; Aramaic; Classical Arabic.

All living languages change all the time.

Thank you. shiva das. This is a very well stated description of the
development of languages. For a more entertaining, but less informative,
description, see Shaw's "Pygmalion" or it's musical adaptation "My Fair
Lady". Shaw was much, much more discerning about language variations
than the "my way or the highway" crowd.
Allen
 




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