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  #31  
Old August 20th 13, 09:32 AM posted to rec.photo.digital
Savageduck[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 16,487
Default Nora

On 2013-08-20 01:16:08 -0700, Savageduck said:

On 2013-08-20 01:05:56 -0700, Sandman said:

In article [email protected],
Savageduck wrote:

Darn! You really don't get it.
The bad grammar is the joke.

Just repeating that claim doesn't make it come true. You would have an
easier time convincing me that his mixing of tense, missing punctuation
and missing capitalisation is part of the cultural reference if you
could show that the cultural reference always or often does this. The
only person in this group that has even spoke of this being a cultural
reference is Pensive Hamster, and he didn't mix tense in his reference
of it, curiously enough.

I'd be amazed if you could show this though, since Google seems
blissfully unaware of this supposed cultural reference. But I admit to
the *possibility* of it being a cultural reference. I'd be happy if
someone could find some form of reference to it though.


No? Figures.

which is where the Queen reference came in -
even though he messed up the grammar in that sentence as a result

He meant to mess up the grammar. That was the deliberate injection of
humor you refuse to accept.


And you refuse to support. Stop making claims you refuse to support.


WTF are you talking about? There is nothing to support. You fail to see
the joke, which is somehow lost in translation.
You are the one who has missed poor, drunken Dave's perfectly
understandable bit of humor. Everybody else in this room seems to have
understood the joke. That should tell you something.


BTW: Here is a variation of the joke.
http://www.nbc.com/saturday-night-li...-queen/n12944/

--
Regards,

Savageduck

  #32  
Old August 20th 13, 10:44 AM posted to rec.photo.digital
Sandman
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,467
Default Nora

In article [email protected],
Savageduck wrote:

And you refuse to support. Stop making claims you refuse to support.


WTF are you talking about? There is nothing to support. You fail to see
the joke, which is somehow lost in translation.


I have already conceded that I missed the (supposed) joke, you are the
one that claims that the joke, being a reference to a cultural
expression, is always or often written with missing punctuation, missing
capitalisation and mixed tense:

Savageduck
[email protected]
"Darn! You really don't get it. The bad grammar is the joke."

I am claiming that I don't believe that these are part of the joke, and
you insist that they are, yet you provide nothing to support that claim.

BTW: Here is a variation of the joke.
http://www.nbc.com/saturday-night-live/video/visiting-the-queen/n12944/


I can't access SNL video due to country restrictions, but I trust this
is the clip you are in reference to:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m17M_rv9Xv8

(the description in your link matches the events in the youtube clip)

And you are going to have to help me out here - where in this clip does
anyone use the expression "like what me and the X do" or a version of
it? Or did you just google for a clip that had something remotely to do
with how the Queen speaks?



--
Sandman[.net]
  #33  
Old August 20th 13, 11:51 AM posted to rec.photo.digital
Eric Stevens
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Posts: 13,611
Default Nora

On Tue, 20 Aug 2013 10:05:56 +0200, Sandman wrote:

In article [email protected],
Savageduck wrote:

Darn! You really don't get it.
The bad grammar is the joke.

Just repeating that claim doesn't make it come true. You would have an
easier time convincing me that his mixing of tense, missing punctuation
and missing capitalisation is part of the cultural reference if you
could show that the cultural reference always or often does this. The
only person in this group that has even spoke of this being a cultural
reference is Pensive Hamster, and he didn't mix tense in his reference
of it, curiously enough.

I'd be amazed if you could show this though, since Google seems
blissfully unaware of this supposed cultural reference. But I admit to
the *possibility* of it being a cultural reference. I'd be happy if
someone could find some form of reference to it though.


No? Figures.

which is where the Queen reference came in -
even though he messed up the grammar in that sentence as a result


He meant to mess up the grammar. That was the deliberate injection of
humor you refuse to accept.


And you refuse to support. Stop making claims you refuse to support.


Next thing he will be claiming Savageduck is a liar. If he persists he
will be classed as a Troll. Then what ... ?
--

Regards,

Eric Stevens
  #34  
Old August 20th 13, 12:00 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
Eric Stevens
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 13,611
Default Nora

On Tue, 20 Aug 2013 07:23:17 +0200, Sandman wrote:

In article ,
Robert Coe wrote:

: Jonas, you're digging yourself a hole! Sid is letting you have it (with
: impeccable grammatical precision) in a recognizably non-RP British dialect.
: (Think Landsmål vs Rijksmål, I don't know whether there's an equivalent
: distinction in Svensk.)
:
: Warning: When Bret Douglas comes on next April 1 with his annual anti-Canon
: screed and promise to switch to Nikon, take a good, thoughtful look at the
: calendar before you respond. :^)

Sorry, I guess it was Dave who was ribbing you. Sid, like me, was trying to
help you see the light.


Well, it seems those that claim themselves to be English "experts" in
this group fail to provide much in the term of support for their claims.

As I've said, I have no problem admitting to missing a cultural
reference. That happens. Even so, with such a reference in mind, the
sentence was still riddled with grammatical and structural errors that
the fine people rushing headlong to support good old drunk Dave is
failing to account for


.... *are* failing to account for. 'Fine people' are plural and 'is' is
singular.

Somebody tell him. :-(
--

Regards,

Eric Stevens
  #35  
Old August 20th 13, 01:06 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
PeterN[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,246
Default Nora

On 8/20/2013 7:00 AM, Eric Stevens wrote:
On Tue, 20 Aug 2013 07:23:17 +0200, Sandman wrote:

In article ,
Robert Coe wrote:

: Jonas, you're digging yourself a hole! Sid is letting you have it (with
: impeccable grammatical precision) in a recognizably non-RP British dialect.
: (Think Landsmål vs Rijksmål, I don't know whether there's an equivalent
: distinction in Svensk.)
:
: Warning: When Bret Douglas comes on next April 1 with his annual anti-Canon
: screed and promise to switch to Nikon, take a good, thoughtful look at the
: calendar before you respond. :^)

Sorry, I guess it was Dave who was ribbing you. Sid, like me, was trying to
help you see the light.


Well, it seems those that claim themselves to be English "experts" in
this group fail to provide much in the term of support for their claims.

As I've said, I have no problem admitting to missing a cultural
reference. That happens. Even so, with such a reference in mind, the
sentence was still riddled with grammatical and structural errors that
the fine people rushing headlong to support good old drunk Dave is
failing to account for


... *are* failing to account for. 'Fine people' are plural and 'is' is
singular.

Somebody tell him. :-(


A few minutes ago, I hinted at that in another thread. ;-)

--
PeterN
  #36  
Old August 20th 13, 01:30 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
Sandman
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,467
Default Nora

In article ,
Whisky-dave wrote:

And you are going to have to help me out here


But I don;t know where teh nearest asylum is to you ;-P


"don;t"
"teh"

And when it comes to spelling and grammar, I need an asylum?

Funny guy! Drunk, but funny

where in this clip does anyone use the expression "like what me and
the X do" or a version of it? Or did you just google for a clip
that had something remotely to do with how the Queen speaks?


You could try Morecambe and Wise a comedy due in the UK in the 70s


Was it due in the 70s, Dave? Or is still due in the 70s?
Or did you mean "duo"?

I think it was enieW


I wonder what that word is supposed to be? Is it a name? Do you mean
Ernie Wise, perhaps?

that came out with "Like wot I wrote" when refering to writing plays
and scripts.


Ok, this has what to do with that?


And I think it was ericM


So names are really truncated like this to you? I guess I would be
jonasE if you wrote my name. Or "jnasE" more likely.

that used a phrase such as I speak the queens english like wot she
does.


Oh, "wot she DOES"? That's a curious use of tense there, Dave. We have
Duck and Sid screaming that you actually meant the other, incorrect,
tense. This is a bit embarrassing. Surely you meant that Eric Morecambe
used a phrase such as:

"I speak the Queens English like what she do"

Right? I mean, that's what you wrote earlier, that they are defending
with their teeth:

"Nice pics pity you don't speak proper english like what me and the
queen do"
-- Drunk Dave

Even so - the phrase "I speak the Queens English like what she does"
yields exactly no results in Google. Their Wikipedia entry refers to the
"like what I" expression becoming a catchphrase, as in "The play what I
wrote".

I readily admit to missing that reference, but to the detractors of
proper substantiations here - the quote still remains incorrectly
presented by Drunk Dave as I have now outlined many times, first he



Maybe we can discuse Kirk, Boldley going where no man has gone before,
shouldn't that really be, to go boldley where no man has gone before.


Actually, it is spelled "boldly", not "boldley". "Boldly" is an adverb
which when describing manner (i.e. slowly, happily, quietly and boldly)
is usually added to the end of the clause, yes.

Jumping happily
Talking quietly
Going boldly

Not sure if this is an actual grammatical rule though. I think it's more
of an editorial rule for written English. Adding strengthening adverbs
before the verb/adjective is quite common when exclaiming the virtues of
something, especially in advertising; "incredibly durable", "amazingly
tasty", or to use a verb; "perfectly removing...".

But if you're going to write, perhaps you would do it some other way,
yes.


--
Sandman[.net]
  #37  
Old August 20th 13, 01:44 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
PeterN[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,246
Default Nora

On 8/20/2013 8:30 AM, Sandman wrote:
In article ,
Whisky-dave wrote:

And you are going to have to help me out here


But I don;t know where teh nearest asylum is to you ;-P


"don;t"
"teh"

And when it comes to spelling and grammar, I need an asylum?

Funny guy! Drunk, but funny

where in this clip does anyone use the expression "like what me and
the X do" or a version of it? Or did you just google for a clip
that had something remotely to do with how the Queen speaks?


You could try Morecambe and Wise a comedy due in the UK in the 70s


Was it due in the 70s, Dave? Or is still due in the 70s?
Or did you mean "duo"?

I think it was enieW


I wonder what that word is supposed to be? Is it a name? Do you mean
Ernie Wise, perhaps?

that came out with "Like wot I wrote" when refering to writing plays
and scripts.


Ok, this has what to do with that?


And I think it was ericM


So names are really truncated like this to you? I guess I would be
jonasE if you wrote my name. Or "jnasE" more likely.

that used a phrase such as I speak the queens english like wot she
does.


Oh, "wot she DOES"? That's a curious use of tense there, Dave. We have
Duck and Sid screaming that you actually meant the other, incorrect,
tense. This is a bit embarrassing. Surely you meant that Eric Morecambe
used a phrase such as:

"I speak the Queens English like what she do"

Right? I mean, that's what you wrote earlier, that they are defending
with their teeth:

"Nice pics pity you don't speak proper english like what me and the
queen do"
-- Drunk Dave

Even so - the phrase "I speak the Queens English like what she does"
yields exactly no results in Google. Their Wikipedia entry refers to the
"like what I" expression becoming a catchphrase, as in "The play what I
wrote".

I readily admit to missing that reference, but to the detractors of
proper substantiations here - the quote still remains incorrectly
presented by Drunk Dave as I have now outlined many times, first he



Maybe we can discuse Kirk, Boldley going where no man has gone before,
shouldn't that really be, to go boldley where no man has gone before.


Actually, it is spelled "boldly", not "boldley". "Boldly" is an adverb
which when describing manner (i.e. slowly, happily, quietly and boldly)
is usually added to the end of the clause, yes.

Jumping happily
Talking quietly
Going boldly

Not sure if this is an actual grammatical rule though. I think it's more
of an editorial rule for written English. Adding strengthening adverbs
before the verb/adjective is quite common when exclaiming the virtues of
something, especially in advertising; "incredibly durable", "amazingly
tasty", or to use a verb; "perfectly removing...".

But if you're going to write, perhaps you would do it some other way,
yes.



Can't resist:
"should"

--
PeterN
  #38  
Old August 20th 13, 01:57 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
Savageduck[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 16,487
Default Nora

On 2013-08-20 05:30:55 -0700, Sandman said:

In article ,
Whisky-dave wrote:

And you are going to have to help me out here


But I don;t know where teh nearest asylum is to you ;-P


"don;t"
"teh"

And when it comes to spelling and grammar, I need an asylum?

Funny guy! Drunk, but funny

where in this clip does anyone use the expression "like what me and
the X do" or a version of it? Or did you just google for a clip
that had something remotely to do with how the Queen speaks?


You could try Morecambe and Wise a comedy due in the UK in the 70s


Was it due in the 70s, Dave? Or is still due in the 70s?
Or did you mean "duo"?

I think it was enieW


I wonder what that word is supposed to be? Is it a name? Do you mean
Ernie Wise, perhaps?

that came out with "Like wot I wrote" when refering to writing plays
and scripts.


Ok, this has what to do with that?


And I think it was ericM


So names are really truncated like this to you? I guess I would be
jonasE if you wrote my name. Or "jnasE" more likely.

that used a phrase such as I speak the queens english like wot she
does.


Oh, "wot she DOES"? That's a curious use of tense there, Dave. We have
Duck and Sid screaming that you actually meant the other, incorrect,
tense. This is a bit embarrassing. Surely you meant that Eric Morecambe
used a phrase such as:

"I speak the Queens English like what she do"

Right? I mean, that's what you wrote earlier, that they are defending
with their teeth:

"Nice pics pity you don't speak proper english like what me and the
queen do"
-- Drunk Dave

Even so - the phrase "I speak the Queens English like what she does"
yields exactly no results in Google. Their Wikipedia entry refers to the
"like what I" expression becoming a catchphrase, as in "The play what I
wrote".

I readily admit to missing that reference, but to the detractors of
proper substantiations here - the quote still remains incorrectly
presented by Drunk Dave as I have now outlined many times, first he



Maybe we can discuse Kirk, Boldley going where no man has gone before,
shouldn't that really be, to go boldley where no man has gone before.


Actually, it is spelled "boldly", not "boldley". "Boldly" is an adverb
which when describing manner (i.e. slowly, happily, quietly and boldly)
is usually added to the end of the clause, yes.

Jumping happily
Talking quietly
Going boldly

Not sure if this is an actual grammatical rule though. I think it's more
of an editorial rule for written English. Adding strengthening adverbs
before the verb/adjective is quite common when exclaiming the virtues of
something, especially in advertising; "incredibly durable", "amazingly
tasty", or to use a verb; "perfectly removing...".

But if you're going to write, perhaps you would do it some other way,
yes.


Whoosh!


--
Regards,

Savageduck

  #39  
Old August 20th 13, 01:58 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
Savageduck[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 16,487
Default Nora

On 2013-08-20 05:44:24 -0700, PeterN said:

On 8/20/2013 8:30 AM, Sandman wrote:
In article ,
Whisky-dave wrote:

And you are going to have to help me out here

But I don;t know where teh nearest asylum is to you ;-P


"don;t"
"teh"

And when it comes to spelling and grammar, I need an asylum?

Funny guy! Drunk, but funny

where in this clip does anyone use the expression "like what me and
the X do" or a version of it? Or did you just google for a clip
that had something remotely to do with how the Queen speaks?

You could try Morecambe and Wise a comedy due in the UK in the 70s


Was it due in the 70s, Dave? Or is still due in the 70s?
Or did you mean "duo"?

I think it was enieW


I wonder what that word is supposed to be? Is it a name? Do you mean
Ernie Wise, perhaps?

that came out with "Like wot I wrote" when refering to writing plays
and scripts.


Ok, this has what to do with that?


And I think it was ericM


So names are really truncated like this to you? I guess I would be
jonasE if you wrote my name. Or "jnasE" more likely.

that used a phrase such as I speak the queens english like wot she
does.


Oh, "wot she DOES"? That's a curious use of tense there, Dave. We have
Duck and Sid screaming that you actually meant the other, incorrect,
tense. This is a bit embarrassing. Surely you meant that Eric Morecambe
used a phrase such as:

"I speak the Queens English like what she do"

Right? I mean, that's what you wrote earlier, that they are defending
with their teeth:

"Nice pics pity you don't speak proper english like what me and the
queen do"
-- Drunk Dave

Even so - the phrase "I speak the Queens English like what she does"
yields exactly no results in Google. Their Wikipedia entry refers to the
"like what I" expression becoming a catchphrase, as in "The play what I
wrote".

I readily admit to missing that reference, but to the detractors of
proper substantiations here - the quote still remains incorrectly
presented by Drunk Dave as I have now outlined many times, first he



Maybe we can discuse Kirk, Boldley going where no man has gone before,
shouldn't that really be, to go boldley where no man has gone before.


Actually, it is spelled "boldly", not "boldley". "Boldly" is an adverb
which when describing manner (i.e. slowly, happily, quietly and boldly)
is usually added to the end of the clause, yes.

Jumping happily
Talking quietly
Going boldly

Not sure if this is an actual grammatical rule though. I think it's more
of an editorial rule for written English. Adding strengthening adverbs
before the verb/adjective is quite common when exclaiming the virtues of
something, especially in advertising; "incredibly durable", "amazingly
tasty", or to use a verb; "perfectly removing...".

But if you're going to write, perhaps you would do it some other way,
yes.



Can't resist:
"should"


"might"

--
Regards,

Savageduck

  #40  
Old August 20th 13, 01:58 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
Sandman
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,467
Default Nora

In article ,
PeterN wrote:

But if you're going to write, perhaps you would do it some other way,
yes.


Can't resist:
"should"


Thanks!

I make lots of errors, and I have no problem with people pointing them
out to me


--
Sandman[.net]
 




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