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Query about cleaning agents for tanks and reels



 
 
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  #1  
Old February 16th 04, 10:56 AM
T R
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Default Query about cleaning agents for tanks and reels

Fellow darkies,

I have a few questions for the chemically astute.

What chemicals are the most practical and effective for thoroughly
eliminating any residue from developing tanks, reels and trays?

I've purchased some used tanks and reels, and I'd like to ensure that
they're completely free of contaminants before I put my film trough them.
What does the best job for this on either plastic or stainless steel
components? Are these agents available in local pharmacies or hardware
stores, or must they be procured from a more specialised outlet? Sourcing
suggestions, if any?

Thanks,

Trad Lad


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  #2  
Old February 16th 04, 12:26 PM
Jean-David Beyer
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Default Query about cleaning agents for tanks and reels

T R wrote:
Fellow darkies,

I have a few questions for the chemically astute.

What chemicals are the most practical and effective for thoroughly
eliminating any residue from developing tanks, reels and trays?


On the theory that prevention is more effective than cure, I have always
washed my tanks and trays after each use in hot water, rubbing gently
with a sponge. Then a hot water rinse. So I have never been troubled by
residue.

I've purchased some used tanks and reels, and I'd like to ensure that
they're completely free of contaminants before I put my film trough them.


If they were new tanks and reels, just wash them in hot water and use a
sponge on them. My guess is that you would probably get away with just
using new items without washing them, but I have never risked that.

What does the best job for this on either plastic or stainless steel
components? Are these agents available in local pharmacies or hardware
stores, or must they be procured from a more specialised outlet? Sourcing
suggestions, if any?

I suppose if you insist on chemical cleaning agents, a product called
_Alconox_ would be the way to go for new equipment. You could probably
use it every day if you do not mind dumping that stuff down the drain
all the time. As I said, I have found hot water does the job if used
immediately after processing.

http://www.alconox.com/static/sectio...en_catalog.asp

For used equipment that looks OK to the eye, that might be enough. If
there is obvious black staining that will not come off with hot water,
or even Alconox, then you may need to use specially compounded reagents
to remove silver deposits, etc. Kodak's TC-1 or TC-3 might be required.
You mix these up yourselves. You want to be careful with those. One of
the ingredients is concentrated sulphuric acid

--
.~. Jean-David Beyer Registered Linux User 85642.
/V\ Registered Machine 73926.
/( )\ Shrewsbury, New Jersey http://counter.li.org
^^-^^ 7:15am up 40 days, 18:37, 2 users, load average: 2.46, 2.27, 2.20

  #3  
Old February 16th 04, 04:13 PM
Nolan
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Query about cleaning agents for tanks and reels

Trad;

There is a company by the name of Photographic solutions that makes a
product by the name of photofinish. This stuff works wonders and is
totaly safe.

Later Nolan


T R wrote in message .. .
Fellow darkies,

I have a few questions for the chemically astute.

What chemicals are the most practical and effective for thoroughly
eliminating any residue from developing tanks, reels and trays?

I've purchased some used tanks and reels, and I'd like to ensure that
they're completely free of contaminants before I put my film trough them.
What does the best job for this on either plastic or stainless steel
components? Are these agents available in local pharmacies or hardware
stores, or must they be procured from a more specialised outlet? Sourcing
suggestions, if any?

Thanks,

Trad Lad


----== Posted via Newsfeed.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==----
http://www.newsfeed.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 100,000 Newsgroups
---= 19 East/West-Coast Specialized Servers - Total Privacy via Encryption =---

  #4  
Old February 17th 04, 01:25 PM
Pieter Litchfield
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Posts: n/a
Default Query about cleaning agents for tanks and reels

I am of the theory that if I use any chemical or soap to clean my gear, I am
introducing the possibility, however remote, of chemical contamination. So
I just rinse everything in hot water after use and rub everything with an
old threadbare cotton washcloth after each session (including my ABS sink
itself). I have never experienced any staining problems to speak of, and I
think most staining is cosmetic - it has no impact on the processing.

"Jean-David Beyer" wrote in message
...
T R wrote:
Fellow darkies,

I have a few questions for the chemically astute.

What chemicals are the most practical and effective for thoroughly
eliminating any residue from developing tanks, reels and trays?


On the theory that prevention is more effective than cure, I have always
washed my tanks and trays after each use in hot water, rubbing gently
with a sponge. Then a hot water rinse. So I have never been troubled by
residue.

I've purchased some used tanks and reels, and I'd like to ensure that
they're completely free of contaminants before I put my film trough

them.

If they were new tanks and reels, just wash them in hot water and use a
sponge on them. My guess is that you would probably get away with just
using new items without washing them, but I have never risked that.

What does the best job for this on either plastic or stainless steel
components? Are these agents available in local pharmacies or hardware
stores, or must they be procured from a more specialised outlet?

Sourcing
suggestions, if any?

I suppose if you insist on chemical cleaning agents, a product called
_Alconox_ would be the way to go for new equipment. You could probably
use it every day if you do not mind dumping that stuff down the drain
all the time. As I said, I have found hot water does the job if used
immediately after processing.

http://www.alconox.com/static/sectio...en_catalog.asp

For used equipment that looks OK to the eye, that might be enough. If
there is obvious black staining that will not come off with hot water,
or even Alconox, then you may need to use specially compounded reagents
to remove silver deposits, etc. Kodak's TC-1 or TC-3 might be required.
You mix these up yourselves. You want to be careful with those. One of
the ingredients is concentrated sulphuric acid

--
.~. Jean-David Beyer Registered Linux User 85642.
/V\ Registered Machine 73926.
/( )\ Shrewsbury, New Jersey http://counter.li.org
^^-^^ 7:15am up 40 days, 18:37, 2 users, load average: 2.46, 2.27, 2.20



 




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