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best landscape film?



 
 
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  #1  
Old December 18th 03, 02:36 AM
Craig
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Posts: n/a
Default best landscape film?

Hello, I'm just returning to slide photography after having been out of it
for a few years. I'm planning a trip to SE Asia next year and am planning
what film to bring. I'll be shooting primarly landscape and scenic shots.
Because it is the tropics (during dry season), the bulk of my shots will be
made in strong sun. Lots of green foliage with blue skies and browns (dirt
roads etc.). Any suggestions as to what films might work best for this?
I've been looking at Fuji Velvia 100F and Kodak E100VS, but am a little
concerned about the saturation. I want saturated colors, but not to the
point that they look unrealistic. I'm also afraid it might be too contrasty
given the strong sun. (I prefer films that portray realistic color and
offer fine grain.) Skin tone isn't a high priority as I will have another
camera loaded with print film that will be used for shooting shots. I will
not be using filters, so a film that can capture the natural colors of the
sky and sea is a plus (hence my reason for considering the above films.)
Would these films be good choices, or should I stick with the old stand bys
(Fuji Sensia and Kodak Elite Chrome). How about Elite Chrome EC? How about
Fuji Provia...a good choice for fine grain but more natural colors than
Velvia?
Craig


--
"They that can give up essential liberty to
obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither
liberty nor safety." -- Benjamin Franklin

Concerned with the direction our government
is going? VOTE LIBERTARIAN



  #2  
Old December 18th 03, 03:14 AM
David J. Littleboy
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Posts: n/a
Default best landscape film?


"Craig" wrote:

Hello, I'm just returning to slide photography after having been out of it
for a few years. I'm planning a trip to SE Asia next year and am planning
what film to bring. I'll be shooting primarly landscape and scenic shots.
Because it is the tropics (during dry season), the bulk of my shots will

be
made in strong sun. Lots of green foliage with blue skies and browns

(dirt
roads etc.). Any suggestions as to what films might work best for this?
I've been looking at Fuji Velvia 100F and Kodak E100VS, but am a little
concerned about the saturation.


I've been shooting a lot of Velvia 100F lately and am quite pleased with it.
It's a completely different film than classic Velvia. Colors are very
neutral. It's a bit less blue than Provia 100F, but otherwise quite similar.

I want saturated colors, but not to the
point that they look unrealistic. I'm also afraid it might be too

contrasty
given the strong sun. (I prefer films that portray realistic color and
offer fine grain.)


You should try the new Astia 100F, since Fuji claims that it's essentially a
finer grain, lower contrast version of Velvia 100F. I haven't done much with
it yet since I've taken to shooting 220, and you have to buy 5 rolls in 220,
and I would like to shoot one or two rolls of it in 220 before buying that
much. I still have 10 rolls of Provia 100F 120 sitting in a drawer unlikely
to get used....

Skin tone isn't a high priority as I will have another
camera loaded with print film that will be used for shooting shots. I

will
not be using filters, so a film that can capture the natural colors of the
sky and sea is a plus (hence my reason for considering the above films.)
Would these films be good choices, or should I stick with the old stand

bys
(Fuji Sensia and Kodak Elite Chrome). How about Elite Chrome EC? How

about
Fuji Provia...a good choice for fine grain but more natural colors than
Velvia?


Again, Velvia 100F is more neutral/natural that Provia 100F. A lot of people
seem to be having trouble getting that through their headsg.

David J. Littleboy
Tokyo, Japan


  #3  
Old December 18th 03, 10:26 AM
Joseph Meehan
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Posts: n/a
Default best landscape film?

In the end your choice is one of personal preference. I suggest that
after you have suggestions from others for films that may fit the
description you have provided, buy a roll of each likely one and give it a
try. Only you, the artist-photographer can make that decision. Film choice
is every bit as important and a part of the photographer's responsibility as
the choice of frame, angle, time of day etc.

If photography could be described by a set of rules, it would cease to
be an art form.

--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math


"Craig" wrote in message
...
Hello, I'm just returning to slide photography after having been out of it
for a few years. I'm planning a trip to SE Asia next year and am planning
what film to bring. I'll be shooting primarly landscape and scenic shots.
Because it is the tropics (during dry season), the bulk of my shots will

be
made in strong sun. Lots of green foliage with blue skies and browns

(dirt
roads etc.). Any suggestions as to what films might work best for this?
I've been looking at Fuji Velvia 100F and Kodak E100VS, but am a little
concerned about the saturation. I want saturated colors, but not to the
point that they look unrealistic. I'm also afraid it might be too

contrasty
given the strong sun. (I prefer films that portray realistic color and
offer fine grain.) Skin tone isn't a high priority as I will have another
camera loaded with print film that will be used for shooting shots. I

will
not be using filters, so a film that can capture the natural colors of the
sky and sea is a plus (hence my reason for considering the above films.)
Would these films be good choices, or should I stick with the old stand

bys
(Fuji Sensia and Kodak Elite Chrome). How about Elite Chrome EC? How

about
Fuji Provia...a good choice for fine grain but more natural colors than
Velvia?
Craig


--
"They that can give up essential liberty to
obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither
liberty nor safety." -- Benjamin Franklin

Concerned with the direction our government
is going? VOTE LIBERTARIAN





  #4  
Old December 18th 03, 03:19 PM
Michael Scarpitti
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default best landscape film?

"Craig" wrote in message . ..
Hello, I'm just returning to slide photography after having been out of it
for a few years. I'm planning a trip to SE Asia next year and am planning
what film to bring. I'll be shooting primarly landscape and scenic shots.
Because it is the tropics (during dry season), the bulk of my shots will be
made in strong sun. Lots of green foliage with blue skies and browns (dirt
roads etc.). Any suggestions as to what films might work best for this?
I've been looking at Fuji Velvia 100F and Kodak E100VS, but am a little
concerned about the saturation. I want saturated colors, but not to the
point that they look unrealistic. I'm also afraid it might be too contrasty
given the strong sun. (I prefer films that portray realistic color and
offer fine grain.) Skin tone isn't a high priority as I will have another
camera loaded with print film that will be used for shooting shots. I will
not be using filters, so a film that can capture the natural colors of the
sky and sea is a plus (hence my reason for considering the above films.)
Would these films be good choices, or should I stick with the old stand bys
(Fuji Sensia and Kodak Elite Chrome). How about Elite Chrome EC? How about
Fuji Provia...a good choice for fine grain but more natural colors than
Velvia?


Kodachrome 64.

Craig

  #5  
Old December 18th 03, 07:08 PM
Alan Browne
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Posts: n/a
Default best landscape film?



Craig wrote:

Hello, I'm just returning to slide photography after having been out of it
for a few years. I'm planning a trip to SE Asia next year and am planning
what film to bring. I'll be shooting primarly landscape and scenic shots.
Because it is the tropics (during dry season), the bulk of my shots will be
made in strong sun. Lots of green foliage with blue skies and browns (dirt
roads etc.). Any suggestions as to what films might work best for this?
I've been looking at Fuji Velvia 100F and Kodak E100VS, but am a little
concerned about the saturation. I want saturated colors, but not to the
point that they look unrealistic. I'm also afraid it might be too contrasty
given the strong sun. (I prefer films that portray realistic color and
offer fine grain.) Skin tone isn't a high priority as I will have another
camera loaded with print film that will be used for shooting shots. I will
not be using filters, so a film that can capture the natural colors of the
sky and sea is a plus (hence my reason for considering the above films.)
Would these films be good choices, or should I stick with the old stand bys
(Fuji Sensia and Kodak Elite Chrome). How about Elite Chrome EC? How about
Fuji Provia...a good choice for fine grain but more natural colors than
Velvia?
Craig



Velvia 100F favours colors but is not as punchy as Velvia 50. I've only
shot 2 rolls of 100F to date, but I'm very pleased. My impression is
that it handles high contrast light better than Provia 100F.

Sensia 100 (same as Astia 100 at less $) is fairly neutral and a great
all purpose slide film. This would be my #1 recomendation.

I'm always surprised at how nice Elitechrome 100 comes out (it's the
consumer packaged Ektachrome 100), but I prefer Sensia 100.

E100S has been off my list since I began scanning slides... while I like
it projected, it is not a great film scanned ... lots of grain and noise.

Cheers,
Alan

--
e-meil: there's no such thing as a FreeLunch.

  #6  
Old December 18th 03, 07:57 PM
Bowser
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Posts: n/a
Default best landscape film?

I liked the colors of Velvia 100F, but not the lack of sharpness. Did you
experience the same thing? (reduced sharpness)

"David J. Littleboy" wrote in message
...

"Craig" wrote:

Hello, I'm just returning to slide photography after having been out of

it
for a few years. I'm planning a trip to SE Asia next year and am

planning
what film to bring. I'll be shooting primarly landscape and scenic

shots.
Because it is the tropics (during dry season), the bulk of my shots will

be
made in strong sun. Lots of green foliage with blue skies and browns

(dirt
roads etc.). Any suggestions as to what films might work best for this?
I've been looking at Fuji Velvia 100F and Kodak E100VS, but am a little
concerned about the saturation.


I've been shooting a lot of Velvia 100F lately and am quite pleased with

it.
It's a completely different film than classic Velvia. Colors are very
neutral. It's a bit less blue than Provia 100F, but otherwise quite

similar.

I want saturated colors, but not to the
point that they look unrealistic. I'm also afraid it might be too

contrasty
given the strong sun. (I prefer films that portray realistic color and
offer fine grain.)


You should try the new Astia 100F, since Fuji claims that it's essentially

a
finer grain, lower contrast version of Velvia 100F. I haven't done much

with
it yet since I've taken to shooting 220, and you have to buy 5 rolls in

220,
and I would like to shoot one or two rolls of it in 220 before buying that
much. I still have 10 rolls of Provia 100F 120 sitting in a drawer

unlikely
to get used....

Skin tone isn't a high priority as I will have another
camera loaded with print film that will be used for shooting shots. I

will
not be using filters, so a film that can capture the natural colors of

the
sky and sea is a plus (hence my reason for considering the above films.)
Would these films be good choices, or should I stick with the old stand

bys
(Fuji Sensia and Kodak Elite Chrome). How about Elite Chrome EC? How

about
Fuji Provia...a good choice for fine grain but more natural colors than
Velvia?


Again, Velvia 100F is more neutral/natural that Provia 100F. A lot of

people
seem to be having trouble getting that through their headsg.

David J. Littleboy
Tokyo, Japan




  #7  
Old December 18th 03, 09:41 PM
Jim Waggener
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Posts: n/a
Default best landscape film?


Again, Velvia 100F is more neutral/natural that Provia 100F. A lot of

people
seem to be having trouble getting that through their headsg.

David J. Littleboy
Tokyo, Japan


All a matter of preferences of course. I still prefer Velvia 50




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  #8  
Old December 18th 03, 10:19 PM
Bandicoot
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Posts: n/a
Default best landscape film?

"Alan Browne" wrote in message
.. .
[SNIP]

Velvia 100F favours colors but is not as punchy as Velvia 50. I've only
shot 2 rolls of 100F to date, but I'm very pleased. My impression is
that it handles high contrast light better than Provia 100F.


I've shot quite a lot of Velvia 100F now, and my impressions are very much
the same. Where the scene can take the contrast I still like 50 a little
more - but that is an issue of personal style more than anything else.


Sensia 100 (same as Astia 100 at less $) is fairly neutral and a great
all purpose slide film. This would be my #1 recomendation.

I'm always surprised at how nice Elitechrome 100 comes out (it's the
consumer packaged Ektachrome 100), but I prefer Sensia 100.


Ektachrome E100G and E100GX seem very good, though I've only done a little
experimentation with them so far. E100GX is slightly less saturated than
Velvia 100F, but (of course) a little warmer. If the OP is going to avoid
all use of filters, this one might be worth a look.


E100S has been off my list since I began scanning slides... while I like
it projected, it is not a great film scanned ... lots of grain and noise.


E100VS is a great film for some subjects, but I find it has less 'universal'
landscape applicability (for me) than the Velvia family. That may be partly
a matter of light though: I work mostly in the UK and Europe - travels to
places with hot dry air seem to see me using much more E100VS than I do 'at
home'. I agree about the grain: I'm really hoping that a 'G' version of it
will come out: the other G films are very fine grained. (Note that E100VS
reproduces certain plant and flower colours very oddly.)



Peter


  #9  
Old December 19th 03, 02:24 AM
Karl Winkler
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default best landscape film?

"David J. Littleboy" wrote in message ...
"Craig" wrote:

Hello, I'm just returning to slide photography after having been out of it
for a few years. I'm planning a trip to SE Asia next year and am planning
what film to bring. I'll be shooting primarly landscape and scenic shots.
Because it is the tropics (during dry season), the bulk of my shots will

be
made in strong sun. Lots of green foliage with blue skies and browns

(dirt
roads etc.). Any suggestions as to what films might work best for this?
I've been looking at Fuji Velvia 100F and Kodak E100VS, but am a little
concerned about the saturation.


I've been shooting a lot of Velvia 100F lately and am quite pleased with it.
It's a completely different film than classic Velvia. Colors are very
neutral. It's a bit less blue than Provia 100F, but otherwise quite similar.

I want saturated colors, but not to the
point that they look unrealistic. I'm also afraid it might be too

contrasty
given the strong sun. (I prefer films that portray realistic color and
offer fine grain.)


You should try the new Astia 100F, since Fuji claims that it's essentially a
finer grain, lower contrast version of Velvia 100F. I haven't done much with
it yet since I've taken to shooting 220, and you have to buy 5 rolls in 220,
and I would like to shoot one or two rolls of it in 220 before buying that
much. I still have 10 rolls of Provia 100F 120 sitting in a drawer unlikely
to get used....

Skin tone isn't a high priority as I will have another
camera loaded with print film that will be used for shooting shots. I

will
not be using filters, so a film that can capture the natural colors of the
sky and sea is a plus (hence my reason for considering the above films.)
Would these films be good choices, or should I stick with the old stand

bys
(Fuji Sensia and Kodak Elite Chrome). How about Elite Chrome EC? How

about
Fuji Provia...a good choice for fine grain but more natural colors than
Velvia?


Again, Velvia 100F is more neutral/natural that Provia 100F. A lot of people
seem to be having trouble getting that through their headsg.

David J. Littleboy
Tokyo, Japan


I've been very pleased with both the new Astia 100F and Velvia 100F.
The Astia has become my main color film, due to the wider lattitude,
ease of scanning, and neutral color. But I do miss a tad of that
"punch" that the Velvia gives. I always shot original Velvia 50 at 40
anyway because otherwise it was just too much. The 100 speed version
seems to be right for rating it at 100. Either film should give you
great results but I'd lean towards the Velvia for landscapes.

I used to shoot almost nothing but Kodachrome 64, but somewhere along
the way, it seemed to get very dull and "brown-looking" to me. Plus,
the difficulty of getting it developed these days is an additional
challenge.

-Karl
http://pages.cthome.net/karlwinkler
  #10  
Old December 19th 03, 02:50 AM
David J. Littleboy
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Posts: n/a
Default best landscape film?

" Bowser" wrote:

I liked the colors of Velvia 100F, but not the lack of sharpness. Did you
experience the same thing? (reduced sharpness)


Not that I've noticed, yet. That does not mean you aren't right...

David J. Littleboy
Tokyo, Japan


 




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