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New semiconductor material investigated



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 24th 20, 09:20 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
geoff
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Posts: 245
Default New semiconductor material investigated

Sounds promising.

https://tinyurl.com/yxt5j7l7

geoff
  #2  
Old November 25th 20, 03:41 AM posted to rec.photo.digital
-hh
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Posts: 838
Default New semiconductor material investigated

On Tuesday, November 24, 2020 at 4:42:16 PM UTC-5, geoff wrote:
Sounds promising.

https://tinyurl.com/yxt5j7l7


It will find a niche somewhere, but don’t expect it to show up in consumer
products for quite awhile. For example, GaAs and GaN have both been
around for over a decade and their applications are still quite spotty:
compared to classical silicone, the wafers are smaller & more expensive,
plus you can easily blow through a couple Million just to optimize one’s
manufacturing to get yields up.

-hh

  #3  
Old November 25th 20, 06:13 AM posted to rec.photo.digital
geoff
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Posts: 245
Default New semiconductor material investigated

On 25/11/2020 4:41 pm, -hh wrote:
On Tuesday, November 24, 2020 at 4:42:16 PM UTC-5, geoff wrote:
Sounds promising.

https://tinyurl.com/yxt5j7l7


It will find a niche somewhere, but don’t expect it to show up in consumer
products for quite awhile. For example, GaAs and GaN have both been
around for over a decade and their applications are still quite spotty:
compared to classical silicone, the wafers are smaller & more expensive,
plus you can easily blow through a couple Million just to optimize one’s
manufacturing to get yields up.


GaAs LEDs have existed for nearly 60 years.

geoff
  #4  
Old November 25th 20, 05:38 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
Alfred Molon[_4_]
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Posts: 2,591
Default New semiconductor material investigated

In article ,
says...

On 25/11/2020 4:41 pm, -hh wrote:
On Tuesday, November 24, 2020 at 4:42:16 PM UTC-5, geoff wrote:
Sounds promising.

https://tinyurl.com/yxt5j7l7

It will find a niche somewhere, but don?t expect it to show up in consumer
products for quite awhile. For example, GaAs and GaN have both been
around for over a decade and their applications are still quite spotty:
compared to classical silicone, the wafers are smaller & more expensive,
plus you can easily blow through a couple Million just to optimize one?s
manufacturing to get yields up.


GaAs LEDs have existed for nearly 60 years.


But Gallium is a quite rare element (especially if compared to
silicon). Probably also much more expensive.
--
Alfred Molon

Olympus 4/3 and micro 4/3 cameras forum at
https://groups.io/g/myolympus
https://myolympus.org/ photo sharing site
  #5  
Old November 25th 20, 11:35 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
Eric Stevens
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Posts: 13,611
Default New semiconductor material investigated

On Wed, 25 Nov 2020 10:20:34 +1300, geoff
wrote:

Sounds promising.

https://tinyurl.com/yxt5j7l7

The article reads like a puff.

Heat is generated in IC circuits not just by the resistance to the
flow of electricity but by switching losses. Heat is generated every
time a bit switches from 0 to 1 (or vice versa). Even if there are no
ohmic losses, switching losses remain.
--

Regards,

Eric Stevens
  #6  
Old November 26th 20, 12:00 AM posted to rec.photo.digital
-hh
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Posts: 838
Default New semiconductor material investigated

On Wednesday, November 25, 2020 at 12:38:35 PM UTC-5, Alfred Molon wrote:
In article ,
says...

On 25/11/2020 4:41 pm, -hh wrote:
On Tuesday, November 24, 2020 at 4:42:16 PM UTC-5, geoff wrote:
Sounds promising.

https://tinyurl.com/yxt5j7l7

It will find a niche somewhere, but don?t expect it to show up in consumer
products for quite awhile. For example, GaAs and GaN have both been
around for over a decade and their applications are still quite spotty:
compared to classical silicone, the wafers are smaller & more expensive,
plus you can easily blow through a couple Million just to optimize one?s
manufacturing to get yields up.


GaAs LEDs have existed for nearly 60 years.


But Gallium is a quite rare element (especially if compared to
silicon). Probably also much more expensive.


He’s missing the point, which is just because a material exists
doesn’t mean that it will “take over” the entire industry...and his
own “GaAs LED” claim confirms this perspective.

FWIW, one of the problems that GaAs has had which have hindered
semiconductor designs is the medium still has uniformity problems
with voids..it progressively trashes the wafer yield as one’s product
size increases. GaN is better in this regards, but its wafers are even
more expensive...it was used a few years back in a ‘DARPA Challenge’
program... think it was for a 10Gbps+ wireless link? Guy I knew who
was working on it does of a heart attack, so I’ve lost track...


-hh


  #7  
Old November 26th 20, 05:46 AM posted to rec.photo.digital
geoff
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Posts: 245
Default New semiconductor material investigated

On 26/11/2020 12:35 pm, Eric Stevens wrote:
On Wed, 25 Nov 2020 10:20:34 +1300, geoff
wrote:

Sounds promising.

https://tinyurl.com/yxt5j7l7

The article reads like a puff.

Heat is generated in IC circuits not just by the resistance to the
flow of electricity but by switching losses. Heat is generated every
time a bit switches from 0 to 1 (or vice versa). Even if there are no
ohmic losses, switching losses remain.


The only cause of heat is current through resistance. This happens
*during* the transistion of 0-1 and vice-versa in switching applications.

geoff
  #8  
Old November 26th 20, 01:23 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
Ken Hart[_4_]
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Posts: 569
Default New semiconductor material investigated

On 11/26/20 12:46 AM, geoff wrote:
On 26/11/2020 12:35 pm, Eric Stevens wrote:
On Wed, 25 Nov 2020 10:20:34 +1300, geoff
wrote:

Sounds promising.

https://tinyurl.com/yxt5j7l7

The article reads like a puff.

Heat is generated in IC circuits not just by the resistance to the
flow of electricity but by switching losses. Heat is generated every
time a bit switches from 0 to 1 (or vice versa). Even if there are no
ohmic losses, switching losses remain.


The only cause of heat is current through resistance. This happens
*during* the transistion of 0-1 and vice-versa in switching applications.

geoff


Because during the transition from open to closed (or vice versa), there
is current flow through a resistance. A switch circuit does not go from
open to closed (or vice versa) in no time at all; there is a very (very,
very) short time when the switch is a (variable) resistor.

--
Ken Hart

  #9  
Old November 26th 20, 10:50 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
geoff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 245
Default New semiconductor material investigated

On 27/11/2020 2:23 am, Ken Hart wrote:
On 11/26/20 12:46 AM, geoff wrote:
On 26/11/2020 12:35 pm, Eric Stevens wrote:
On Wed, 25 Nov 2020 10:20:34 +1300, geoff
wrote:

Sounds promising.

https://tinyurl.com/yxt5j7l7

The article reads like a puff.

Heat is generated in IC circuits not just by the resistance to the
flow of electricity but by switching losses. Heat is generated every
time a bit switches from 0 to 1 (or vice versa). Even if there are no
ohmic losses, switching losses remain.


The only cause of heat is current through resistance. This happens
*during* the transistion of 0-1 and vice-versa in switching applications.

geoff


Because during the transition from open to closed (or vice versa), there
is current flow through a resistance. A switch circuit does not go from
open to closed (or vice versa) in no time at all; there is a very (very,
very) short time when the switch is a (variable) resistor.


Yeah, like what I said,

geoff
  #10  
Old November 26th 20, 10:52 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
Eric Stevens
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 13,611
Default New semiconductor material investigated

On Thu, 26 Nov 2020 08:23:37 -0500, Ken Hart
wrote:

On 11/26/20 12:46 AM, geoff wrote:
On 26/11/2020 12:35 pm, Eric Stevens wrote:
On Wed, 25 Nov 2020 10:20:34 +1300, geoff
wrote:

Sounds promising.

https://tinyurl.com/yxt5j7l7

The article reads like a puff.

Heat is generated in IC circuits not just by the resistance to the
flow of electricity but by switching losses. Heat is generated every
time a bit switches from 0 to 1 (or vice versa). Even if there are no
ohmic losses, switching losses remain.


The only cause of heat is current through resistance. This happens
*during* the transistion of 0-1 and vice-versa in switching applications.

geoff


Because during the transition from open to closed (or vice versa), there
is current flow through a resistance. A switch circuit does not go from
open to closed (or vice versa) in no time at all; there is a very (very,
very) short time when the switch is a (variable) resistor.


Quite right and switching heating can be a significant part of the the
thermal load.
--

Regards,

Eric Stevens
 




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