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A few birds and auto-focus be damned.



 
 
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  #11  
Old April 4th 18, 07:04 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
PeterN[_7_]
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Posts: 1,050
Default A few birds and auto-focus be damned.

On 4/3/2018 8:36 PM, Savageduck wrote:
On Apr 3, 2018, PeterN wrote
(in article ):

On 3/16/2018 12:34 PM, Savageduck wrote:

snip


The important thing to remember when it comes to IS/OS/VR is that it is
there to provide a fix for camera shake, not subject movement, and once you have a
shutter speed over 1/500 sec IS/OS/VR is irrelevant as the high shutter
speed should freeze all subject movement. Since you shot those ducks at 1/2000 you
could probably have managed without IS.

I usually turn off IR for any critter tracking, as it slows down the
tracking a tad. The shutter speed stability depends on the user's
individual hand stability, speed of the critter, and the focal length of
the lens.


I am not too sure that “shutter speed stability” is the term you are
looking for. This is the first time I have heard it used.

If when shooting handheld, and you have a static target/subject, relatively
slow shutter speed (usually slower than 1/120-1/80), and a longer focal
length IBIS, or ILIS (IS/OS/VR) is going to be a great help.The greatest
benefit will be found with handheld landscapes, or portraits.

When it comes to moving targets/subjects a shutter speed, direction of
movement relative to the photographer, and camera handling techniques are
going to be far more beneficial than any mechanical stabilization. The only
time stabilization can help with a moving target/subject is when the movement
is directly away, or towards the photographer. When shooting with a panning
motion the camera is stabilized by the inertia imparted to the camera system
by the lateral movement of the camera tracking the target.

i am talking about shooting fast moving objects, at a high shutter
speed. I agree that IS is indispensable for slow moving objects and when
shooting at slow shutter speeds.



--
PeterN
  #12  
Old April 4th 18, 07:23 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
nospam
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Posts: 22,013
Default A few birds and auto-focus be damned.

In article , PeterN
wrote:

I usually turn off IR for any critter tracking,


be sure to leave uv on.


So I made an obvious typo.


it's not the first time and certainly not the last.

as it slows down the
tracking a tad.


actually it doesn't, since stabilization is an independent system which
keeps the subject steady in the frame, making it *easier* for focus
tracking to work.


it takes time to stabilize.


the delay is only at the start.

after that, stabilization is continuous, improving both autofocus and
subject tracking.

This image would not be the same with
stabilization.


without a controlled comparison of photos taken with and without
stabilization, there's no way to know what differences there will be,
if any. for all you know, a stabilized version would be better.
  #13  
Old April 4th 18, 07:23 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
nospam
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 22,013
Default A few birds and auto-focus be damned.

In article , PeterN
wrote:

I am not too sure that shutter speed stability is the term you are
looking for. This is the first time I have heard it used.

If when shooting handheld, and you have a static target/subject, relatively
slow shutter speed (usually slower than 1/120-1/80), and a longer focal
length IBIS, or ILIS (IS/OS/VR) is going to be a great help.The greatest
benefit will be found with handheld landscapes, or portraits.

When it comes to moving targets/subjects a shutter speed, direction of
movement relative to the photographer, and camera handling techniques are
going to be far more beneficial than any mechanical stabilization. The only
time stabilization can help with a moving target/subject is when the movement
is directly away, or towards the photographer. When shooting with a panning
motion the camera is stabilized by the inertia imparted to the camera system
by the lateral movement of the camera tracking the target.

i am talking about shooting fast moving objects, at a high shutter
speed. I agree that IS is indispensable for slow moving objects and when
shooting at slow shutter speeds.


stabilization doesn't do anything for subject motion.

stabilization helps *camera* motion, generally when shooting at slower
shutter speeds. it can be used at higher speeds, but it's not as useful
and can potentially alias.
  #14  
Old April 8th 18, 11:03 AM posted to rec.photo.digital
android
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Posts: 3,854
Default A few birds and auto-focus be damned.

On 2018-04-04 00:52:57 +0000, Savageduck said:

On Apr 3, 2018, Bill W wrote
(in ):

On Tue, 03 Apr 2018 17:41:28 -0700, Savageduck
wrote:

On Apr 3, 2018, nospam wrote
(in ) :

In , PeterN
wrote:

The important thing to remember when it comes to IS/OS/VR is that it is
there to provide a fix for camera shake, not subject movement, and once
you have
a shutter speed over 1/500 sec IS/OS/VR is irrelevant as the high shutter
speed should freeze all subject movement. Since you shot those ducks at
1/2000
you could probably have managed without IS.

I usually turn off IR for any critter tracking,

be sure to leave uv on.

UV?


You're slipping...


OK! OK! I missed Peter’s typo goof.


How many days are you given? :...-(
--
teleportation kills

  #15  
Old April 8th 18, 11:03 AM posted to rec.photo.digital
android
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,854
Default A few birds and auto-focus be damned.

On 2018-04-04 01:22:14 +0000, Bill W said:

On Tue, 03 Apr 2018 17:52:57 -0700, Savageduck
wrote:

On Apr 3, 2018, Bill W wrote
(in ):

On Tue, 03 Apr 2018 17:41:28 -0700, Savageduck
wrote:

On Apr 3, 2018, nospam wrote
(in ) :

In , PeterN
wrote:

The important thing to remember when it comes to IS/OS/VR is that it is
there to provide a fix for camera shake, not subject movement, and once
you have
a shutter speed over 1/500 sec IS/OS/VR is irrelevant as the high shutter
speed should freeze all subject movement. Since you shot those ducks at
1/2000
you could probably have managed without IS.

I usually turn off IR for any critter tracking,

be sure to leave uv on.

UV?

You're slipping...


OK! OK! I missed Peters typo goof.


It's okay. We're a forgiving lot around here.


Peter is silent...
--
teleportation kills

 




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