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Photographing children



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 11th 03, 05:45 PM
Steven Church
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Default Photographing children

I take individual photographs of children at sports events. A problem I
have is getting them to smile naturally. Sometimes I can not get them to
smile (especially the children ages 5 - 8). Does anyone have any
suggestions/tips ?


  #2  
Old October 11th 03, 06:46 PM
Mxsmanic
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Default Photographing children

Steven Church writes:

I take individual photographs of children at sports events. A problem I
have is getting them to smile naturally. Sometimes I can not get them to
smile (especially the children ages 5 - 8). Does anyone have any
suggestions/tips ?


Why do they have to smile?

--
Transpose hotmail and mxsmanic in my e-mail address to reach me directly.
  #3  
Old October 11th 03, 07:14 PM
Randall Ainsworth
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Default Photographing children

Back in my studio days I always figured if people wanted pictures of
their kids smiling they could get that at Penny's for 49-cents. I
preferred to let kids be themselves and try to capture that.
  #4  
Old October 12th 03, 01:32 AM
J C
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Default Photographing children

On Sat, 11 Oct 2003 19:46:24 +0200, Mxsmanic
wrote:

Steven Church writes:

I take individual photographs of children at sports events. A problem I
have is getting them to smile naturally. Sometimes I can not get them to
smile (especially the children ages 5 - 8). Does anyone have any
suggestions/tips ?


Why do they have to smile?


Probably because he's not considered the alternatives... which are
much better.

He probably also hasn't considered how people feel about strangers in
public places taking pictures of their kids. I've been on both sides
of this. It's pretty uncomfortable when it is your kid.


-- JC
  #5  
Old October 12th 03, 02:36 AM
Mxsmanic
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Default Photographing children

J C writes:

He probably also hasn't considered how people feel about strangers in
public places taking pictures of their kids. I've been on both sides
of this. It's pretty uncomfortable when it is your kid.


Only if you have a dirty mind.

--
Transpose hotmail and mxsmanic in my e-mail address to reach me directly.
  #7  
Old October 14th 03, 02:52 AM
Jack Germsheid
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Default Photographing children

Try asking them about their girlfreind or boyfriend, Of course they
still hate the opposite sex but it will get them to loosen up.
Nonsensical questions can work too. Try asking them what they want Santa
to bring therm at Halloween or is Batman wearing any underwear under
those other shorts. An impish look is better than the deer in the
headlight look. Yeah they are only little leage trading card pics, but a
smile helps - that's what M&D want.
Jack

Steven Church wrote:

I take individual photographs of children at sports events. A problem I
have is getting them to smile naturally. Sometimes I can not get them to
smile (especially the children ages 5 - 8). Does anyone have any
suggestions/tips ?





  #8  
Old October 14th 03, 04:38 AM
zeitgeist
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Default Photographing children


"Jack Germsheid" wrote in message
...
Try asking them about their girlfreind or boyfriend, Of course they
still hate the opposite sex but it will get them to loosen up.
Nonsensical questions can work too. Try asking them what they want Santa
to bring therm at Halloween or is Batman wearing any underwear under
those other shorts. An impish look is better than the deer in the
headlight look. Yeah they are only little leage trading card pics, but a
smile helps - that's what M&D want.
Jack


that works in the next age group up, the 8-12's, the OP was talking about
5-8

so, ah, you married? that crackes a ten year old up...


  #9  
Old October 14th 03, 04:02 PM
JustaPawn
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Default Photographing children

I take a lot of pictures of kids at sporting events myself (mostly baseball and
soccer) I find the most successful pictures (and the ones the parents enjoy the
most) are the natural, at play ones. Kids seem to develop an unnatural approach
when they see the camera and instantly start mugging and posing. I try and
catch them unaware.

I take individual photographs of children at sports events. A problem I
have is getting them to smile naturally. Sometimes I can not get them to
smile (especially the children ages 5 - 8). Does anyone have any
suggestions/tips ?




  #10  
Old October 14th 03, 08:54 PM
Jack Germsheid
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Default Photographing children

I agree.I'm just looking at my four-year-olds pic from summer soccer
league. Every kid has cheesy unantuaral smile on their face in the group
shot and their individuals. The coach had asked me I wanted to do these
shots but I don't really want to do this end of the market. I think the
pics and the folder were five bucks or something ridiculous and of
course we bought ours. I did a bunch of action shots of my child and
others and gave the others away with my business card as a lot leader
for more formal portrait work.
JustaPawn wrote:

I find the most successful pictures (and the ones the parents enjoy the
most) are the natural, at play ones. Kids seem to develop an unnatural approach
when they see the camera and instantly start mugging and posing.


I try and
catch them unaware.

This of course would use a few more frames and time in a price concious
job but would yeild superior results.










 




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