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Q: processing Kodachrome 25 color slide to get B&W?



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 30th 03, 01:22 AM
David Foy
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Q: processing Kodachrome 25 color slide to get B&W?

You can process Kodachrome at home as a color film, but not likely with
success, roll after roll. It requires extremely precise time and temperature
control because it only works if the developer diffuses a very precise
distance into the emulsion, and no farther, before it is neutralized, and it
must do this three separate times. I suspect making a rocket would be a lot
easier.

David Foy
By the way, did you know Kodachrome was invented by two musicians?

"Alec Jones" wrote in message
.. .
Simply NOT true. Just read the continued thread below. There have been
several people in the past that did it at home, and without the automation
you presume.

It is difficult, but not "rocket science". So, do some research before

you
just spout off such absolutes!


"Randall Ainsworth" wrote in message
...
I think that would depend upon the size of one's home and wallet!
There's always a way, or it couldn't be done anywhere else.


No, the machinery is extremely expensive and it requires several highly
trained people to run it. YOU CANNOT PROCESS KODACHROME AT HOME!!!





  #2  
Old September 30th 03, 02:35 AM
Robert Vervoordt
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Q: processing Kodachrome 25 color slide to get B&W?

On Tue, 30 Sep 2003 00:22:53 GMT, "David Foy"
wrote:

You can process Kodachrome at home as a color film, but not likely with
success, roll after roll. It requires extremely precise time and temperature
control because it only works if the developer diffuses a very precise
distance into the emulsion,


That was the earlier Kodachrome color development process. Probably
just in the 1930s. The later process was a conventional color
coupling development and was a great improvement in many areas.

and no farther, before it is neutralized, and it
must do this three separate times. I suspect making a rocket would be a lot
easier.


I have to express admiration for both. Processing Kodachrome preceded
the moon landings, so, perhaps Rocket Science is somewhat harder. ;-/


David Foy
By the way, did you know Kodachrome was invented by two musicians?

"Alec Jones" wrote in message
. ..
Simply NOT true. Just read the continued thread below. There have been
several people in the past that did it at home, and without the automation
you presume.

It is difficult, but not "rocket science". So, do some research before

you
just spout off such absolutes!


"Randall Ainsworth" wrote in message
...
I think that would depend upon the size of one's home and wallet!
There's always a way, or it couldn't be done anywhere else.

No, the machinery is extremely expensive and it requires several highly
trained people to run it. YOU CANNOT PROCESS KODACHROME AT HOME!!!





Robert Vervoordt, MFA
  #3  
Old September 30th 03, 04:37 AM
Ron Andrews
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Q: processing Kodachrome 25 color slide to get B&W?

"David Foy" wrote in part:
You can process Kodachrome at home as a color film, but not likely with
success, roll after roll. It requires extremely precise time and

temperature
control because it only works if the developer diffuses a very precise
distance into the emulsion, and no farther, before it is neutralized, and

it
must do this three separate times. I suspect making a rocket would be a

lot
easier.


The original Kodachrome introduced in 1935 relyed on diffusion
control. The film had fat interlayers between the color layers to allow for
some variation. Process control technicians routinely used a microtome to
cut crossections of the filme to view under a microscope. In 1938 Kodak
introduced the "selective re-exsposure" process. In this process, there were
red and blue re-exposure lights to make these layers developable prior to
the separate cyan and yellow developers. The magenta developer (last one)
had a chemical fogging agent. The re-exposure lights would be the tough
parts of the process to do at home. It is not impossible, but it is well
beyond the capability of the typical home darkroom enthusiast. You would
also need to find a source for the raw chemicals and mix your own solutions.

David Foy
By the way, did you know Kodachrome was invented by two musicians?


Yep. Both were named Leopold. Here are more details:
http://www.jewishworldreview.com/0398/geduld1.html


  #4  
Old September 30th 03, 05:02 AM
Norman Worth
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Q: processing Kodachrome 25 color slide to get B&W?

I doubt if you could find the chemicals to do K-14 processing at home. They
are exotic and expensive, and they are made for machine processing. You
also need a way to re-expose the film to the right colored light in the
reversal process and a way to remove the rem-jet backing from the film.

Commercial labs will still process K25. It uses the same process as K64.

"David Foy" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
You can process Kodachrome at home as a color film, but not likely with
success, roll after roll. It requires extremely precise time and

temperature
control because it only works if the developer diffuses a very precise
distance into the emulsion, and no farther, before it is neutralized, and

it
must do this three separate times. I suspect making a rocket would be a

lot
easier.

David Foy
By the way, did you know Kodachrome was invented by two musicians?

"Alec Jones" wrote in message
.. .
Simply NOT true. Just read the continued thread below. There have been
several people in the past that did it at home, and without the

automation
you presume.

It is difficult, but not "rocket science". So, do some research before

you
just spout off such absolutes!


"Randall Ainsworth" wrote in message
...
I think that would depend upon the size of one's home and wallet!
There's always a way, or it couldn't be done anywhere else.

No, the machinery is extremely expensive and it requires several

highly
trained people to run it. YOU CANNOT PROCESS KODACHROME AT HOME!!!







  #5  
Old September 30th 03, 05:41 PM
Slingblade
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Q: processing Kodachrome 25 color slide to get B&W?

On Tue, 30 Sep 2003 00:22:53 GMT, "David Foy"
wrote:

You can process Kodachrome at home as a color film, but not likely with
success, roll after roll. It requires extremely precise time and temperature
control because it only works if the developer diffuses a very precise
distance into the emulsion, and no farther, before it is neutralized, and it
must do this three separate times. I suspect making a rocket would be a lot
easier.

David Foy
By the way, did you know Kodachrome was invented by two musicians?


I hope you're not going to say Simon and Garfunkel!
  #6  
Old October 1st 03, 02:04 AM
Michael Scarpitti
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Q: processing Kodachrome 25 color slide to get B&W?

Slingblade wrote in message . ..
On Tue, 30 Sep 2003 00:22:53 GMT, "David Foy"
wrote:

You can process Kodachrome at home as a color film, but not likely with
success, roll after roll. It requires extremely precise time and temperature
control because it only works if the developer diffuses a very precise
distance into the emulsion, and no farther, before it is neutralized, and it
must do this three separate times. I suspect making a rocket would be a lot
easier.

David Foy
By the way, did you know Kodachrome was invented by two musicians?


I hope you're not going to say Simon and Garfunkel!


No-one can say 'Simon and Garfunkel'.
  #7  
Old October 1st 03, 06:43 PM
Slingblade
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Q: processing Kodachrome 25 color slide to get B&W?

On 30 Sep 2003 18:04:42 -0700, (Michael
Scarpitti) wrote:

David Foy
By the way, did you know Kodachrome was invented by two musicians?


I hope you're not going to say Simon and Garfunkel!


No-one can say 'Simon and Garfunkel'.


Mama, don't take my Kodachrome away!
  #8  
Old October 15th 03, 03:31 PM
David Foy
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Q: processing Kodachrome 25 color slide to get B&W?

Fascinating! I much appreciate your contribution.
DF
"Ron Andrews" wrote in message
...
"David Foy" wrote in part:
You can process Kodachrome at home as a color film, but not likely with
success, roll after roll. It requires extremely precise time and

temperature
control because it only works if the developer diffuses a very precise
distance into the emulsion, and no farther, before it is neutralized,

and
it
must do this three separate times. I suspect making a rocket would be a

lot
easier.


The original Kodachrome introduced in 1935 relyed on diffusion
control. The film had fat interlayers between the color layers to allow

for
some variation. Process control technicians routinely used a microtome to
cut crossections of the filme to view under a microscope. In 1938 Kodak
introduced the "selective re-exsposure" process. In this process, there

were
red and blue re-exposure lights to make these layers developable prior to
the separate cyan and yellow developers. The magenta developer (last one)
had a chemical fogging agent. The re-exposure lights would be the tough
parts of the process to do at home. It is not impossible, but it is well
beyond the capability of the typical home darkroom enthusiast. You would
also need to find a source for the raw chemicals and mix your own

solutions.

David Foy
By the way, did you know Kodachrome was invented by two musicians?


Yep. Both were named Leopold. Here are more details:
http://www.jewishworldreview.com/0398/geduld1.html




  #9  
Old October 15th 03, 03:31 PM
David Foy
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Q: processing Kodachrome 25 color slide to get B&W?

I agree. Those among us who might do it are also those who could source some
fairly exotic chemistry.
DF
"Norman Worth" wrote in message
hlink.net...
I doubt if you could find the chemicals to do K-14 processing at home.

They
are exotic and expensive, and they are made for machine processing. You
also need a way to re-expose the film to the right colored light in the
reversal process and a way to remove the rem-jet backing from the film.

Commercial labs will still process K25. It uses the same process as K64.

"David Foy" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
You can process Kodachrome at home as a color film, but not likely with
success, roll after roll. It requires extremely precise time and

temperature
control because it only works if the developer diffuses a very precise
distance into the emulsion, and no farther, before it is neutralized,

and
it
must do this three separate times. I suspect making a rocket would be a

lot
easier.

David Foy
By the way, did you know Kodachrome was invented by two musicians?

"Alec Jones" wrote in message
.. .
Simply NOT true. Just read the continued thread below. There have

been
several people in the past that did it at home, and without the

automation
you presume.

It is difficult, but not "rocket science". So, do some research

before
you
just spout off such absolutes!


"Randall Ainsworth" wrote in message
...
I think that would depend upon the size of one's home and wallet!
There's always a way, or it couldn't be done anywhere else.

No, the machinery is extremely expensive and it requires several

highly
trained people to run it. YOU CANNOT PROCESS KODACHROME AT

HOME!!!








  #10  
Old October 15th 03, 08:09 PM
Ektarkid
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Q: processing Kodachrome 25 color slide to get B&W?

It's my understanding that the processing machine is about 80 feet long for
one thing...try explaining that to your wife.
Also, I'm told the QC manual is about 5 inches thick...sounds like K-25
processing needs to left to the pros...


"David Foy" wrote in message
...
I agree. Those among us who might do it are also those who could source

some
fairly exotic chemistry.
DF
"Norman Worth" wrote in message
hlink.net...
I doubt if you could find the chemicals to do K-14 processing at home.

They
are exotic and expensive, and they are made for machine processing. You
also need a way to re-expose the film to the right colored light in the
reversal process and a way to remove the rem-jet backing from the film.

Commercial labs will still process K25. It uses the same process as

K64.

"David Foy" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
You can process Kodachrome at home as a color film, but not likely

with
success, roll after roll. It requires extremely precise time and

temperature
control because it only works if the developer diffuses a very precise
distance into the emulsion, and no farther, before it is neutralized,

and
it
must do this three separate times. I suspect making a rocket would be

a
lot
easier.

David Foy
By the way, did you know Kodachrome was invented by two musicians?

"Alec Jones" wrote in message
.. .
Simply NOT true. Just read the continued thread below. There have

been
several people in the past that did it at home, and without the

automation
you presume.

It is difficult, but not "rocket science". So, do some research

before
you
just spout off such absolutes!


"Randall Ainsworth" wrote in message
...
I think that would depend upon the size of one's home and

wallet!
There's always a way, or it couldn't be done anywhere else.

No, the machinery is extremely expensive and it requires several

highly
trained people to run it. YOU CANNOT PROCESS KODACHROME AT

HOME!!!










 




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