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Dust on Sensor?



 
 
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  #1  
Old February 22nd 05, 08:17 PM
Harvey
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Default Dust on Sensor?

Can the high end point and shoot from Nikon, Canon, Olympus or Panasonic
suffer from dust on the sensor as they age? Or is that just a DSLR
characteristic due to interchangeable lenses?


  #2  
Old February 22nd 05, 08:28 PM
Owamanga
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On Tue, 22 Feb 2005 20:17:42 GMT, "Harvey"
wrote:

Can the high end point and shoot from Nikon, Canon, Olympus or Panasonic
suffer from dust on the sensor as they age? Or is that just a DSLR
characteristic due to interchangeable lenses?


Technically possible, the things aren't air-tight (otherwise you could
use them under water)

0-)

Not sure how often it actually happens in day to day use though.

Anyway, if it ever does just bung the whole camera on a ultrasonic
transducer and it'll shake off again. ;-)

--
Owamanga!
  #3  
Old February 22nd 05, 09:09 PM
Scott W
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I have never heard of it happening. I Have had my F828 in some pretty
nasty salt spray and no problems, yet.

Scott

  #4  
Old February 23rd 05, 07:24 AM
MarkČ
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"Scott W" wrote in message
oups.com...
I have never heard of it happening. I Have had my F828 in some pretty
nasty salt spray and no problems, yet.

Scott


Salt spray has little to no relation to dust.
Dust remains air-borne, and can become air-borne again after settling on
components...while salt-spray is so large and sticky that it won't coninue to float around
your camera's internals long enough to make it around all those corners on it's way to the
sensor.


  #5  
Old February 23rd 05, 07:28 AM
Scott W
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Mark=B2 lowest even number here wrote:
"Scott W" wrote in message
oups.com...
I have never heard of it happening. I Have had my F828 in some

pretty
nasty salt spray and no problems, yet.

Scott


Salt spray has little to no relation to dust.
Dust remains air-borne, and can become air-borne again after settling

on
components...while salt-spray is so large and sticky that it won't

coninue to float around
your camera's internals long enough to make it around all those

corners on it's way to the
sensor.

As the water part of the spray evaporates you are left with small air
born salt cystals, these bloody things travel for miles, I have rust to
prove it. They may well be too small to be notice on a sensor, in
small numbers at least.

Scott

Scott

  #6  
Old February 23rd 05, 07:35 AM
MarkČ
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"Scott W" wrote in message
oups.com...

MarkČ lowest even number here wrote:
"Scott W" wrote in message
oups.com...
I have never heard of it happening. I Have had my F828 in some

pretty
nasty salt spray and no problems, yet.

Scott


Salt spray has little to no relation to dust.
Dust remains air-borne, and can become air-borne again after settling

on
components...while salt-spray is so large and sticky that it won't

coninue to float around
your camera's internals long enough to make it around all those

corners on it's way to the
sensor.

As the water part of the spray evaporates you are left with small air
born salt cystals, these bloody things travel for miles, I have rust to
prove it. They may well be too small to be notice on a sensor, in
small numbers at least.
-----------------------------
Certainly I agree with the first part of this post. Microscopic crystals can certainly
travel.
But I also agree with your second part, and suspect that only an accumulation would make a
noticable difference that might resemble the typical dust spot problem.
With a DSLR, the worry would be far larger droplets getting on the sensor during a foolish
lens change in the spray.

I suspect the salt crystals you refer to would make a difference (damage) your other
camera components sooner than your sensor...

-But hey--I'm just thinking out loud here...



  #7  
Old February 23rd 05, 04:33 PM
Scott W
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Mark=B2 (lowest even number here) wrote:

I suspect the salt crystals you refer to would make a difference

(damage) your other
camera components sooner than your sensor...

And I do worry about damage to the other components as well. There is
no way to avoid the salt here so the only thing to do is hope for the
best.

For the most part I think the cameras are pretty well sealed and I
would be surprised if anything much larger then a micron could get in.

Scott

 




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