A Photography forum. PhotoBanter.com

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » PhotoBanter.com forum » Photo Equipment » APS Photographic Equipment
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

APS Sucks.



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old October 28th 03, 04:06 AM
Jef
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default APS Sucks.

Face it. APS is a way for you to spend more and get half the neg of
35mm. APS is good for those who would rather have a camera that is
small and takes bad pictures, instead of one that is slightly larger
that takes far better ones. I was suckered into it years ago when I
wanted a camera I could take everywhere. It's a farce, and anyone who
wants better prints and paid 500 for an APS should feel as stupid as
I do for buying. It's not a technology as much as it is a way to sell
less film and chems and charge the same, if not more. I was once
ignorant of this, but ignorance is bliss I suppose. At least digital
has some qualities I can respect, APS is only the same, but worse.

Jeff
http://inDigital.ca
  #2  
Old October 28th 03, 08:38 AM
Peter Stegemann
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default APS Sucks.

(Jef):

...should feel as stupid as I... I was once ignorant of this...


Making yourself a fool on Usenet won't help you over this.
  #3  
Old October 29th 03, 02:20 AM
Ron Andrews
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default APS Sucks.

I'm not sure I can add more after Peter Stegemann's post, but I'll
attempt a serious reply.
IMHO, APS is the best snapshot system ever designed. My Advantix 3700
has been on many hikes and ski trips and looks terrible, but it still turns
out quality pictures. I can change rolls with my gloves on when I'm skiing.
The camera remembers the date and time for each picture. I don't use the pan
format much, but I appreciate the "H" format. The simple plastic case that
holds index prints and cassettes is the best storage system we've used,
mostly because it is so easy. I say all this as one who appreciates good
image quality. I use my SLR when I'm serious about picture taking. On
occasion I will drag out the Crown Graphic and shoot 4x5 sheet film. I
wouldn't try to make a 20x30 enlargement from APS, but sometimes I want
simple snapshots. For that, APS is hard to beat.

--
Ron Andrews
http://members.hostedscripts.com/antispam.html


  #4  
Old October 29th 03, 04:11 AM
Ken Rosenbaum
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default APS Sucks.


"Ron Andrews" wrote in message
...
I use my SLR when I'm serious about picture taking. On
occasion I will drag out the Crown Graphic and shoot 4x5 sheet film. I
wouldn't try to make a 20x30 enlargement from APS, but sometimes I want
simple snapshots. For that, APS is hard to beat.


Ron,
I can absolutely agree with you. I have complete 35mm systems by Nikon,
Pentax, Canon and Minolta with some of the finest lenses they offer. I
recently used a Canon Elph for just the type of snaps you described. It was
used alternately with a Nikon N8008S and a 24-50 AF Nikkor zoom lens. You
cannot tell the difference in the 4x6 prints I made in the Disney World
area.
I have found the same to be true of my Canon Elph Jr., which offers me a
little more in low-light shooting with its 2.8 lens. Razor sharp in the 4x6
or 4x7 formats.
The APS cameras are most handy in the evenings at restaurants etc. when I
just don't want to haul around a 35mm rig. They capture the moments
perfectly, and I daresay nobody can tell which format was used. A big key,
in my mind, is to stay within the limits of the flash if flash is used. If I
intend to make 8x10 or bigger enlargements, then I tote the 35mm stuff. But
I almost always have an APS camera in a pocket even if I am carrying the
bigger rig.
Ken



  #5  
Old October 29th 03, 04:37 AM
Tom Pfeiffer
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default APS Sucks.

I figure if Jeff can't spell his own name, he's probably not good enough
with cameras to bother debating:

From: "Jef"

snip
Jeff
http://inDigital.ca



Tom P.


  #6  
Old October 29th 03, 11:41 AM
Jim Knoll
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default APS Sucks.

APS is Fantastic.

Pickup a Nikon Nuvis S or S 2000 camera and crank some Fuji 200 ISO film
through it. You will be amazed.

I gave a Nikon Nuvis S 2000 to my niece for a birthday gift. She used it
with Fuji film on a trip and shot the middle setting larger than 4x6
prints. The quality was really good. In fact the friends who went on the
trip with her voted her pictures the best in overall color, sharpness,
and focus. The neat thing about the Nuvis S 2000 is its small size and
quick access opening cover for use.

I vote that APS has a place in the great kingdom of photography.

  #7  
Old October 29th 03, 06:04 PM
Dale DePriest
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default APS Sucks.



Ken Rosenbaum wrote:

"Ron Andrews" wrote in message
...
I use my SLR when I'm serious about picture taking. On

occasion I will drag out the Crown Graphic and shoot 4x5 sheet film. I
wouldn't try to make a 20x30 enlargement from APS, but sometimes I want
simple snapshots. For that, APS is hard to beat.



Ron,
I can absolutely agree with you. I have complete 35mm systems by Nikon,
Pentax, Canon and Minolta with some of the finest lenses they offer. I
recently used a Canon Elph for just the type of snaps you described. It was
used alternately with a Nikon N8008S and a 24-50 AF Nikkor zoom lens. You
cannot tell the difference in the 4x6 prints I made in the Disney World
area.
I have found the same to be true of my Canon Elph Jr., which offers me a
little more in low-light shooting with its 2.8 lens. Razor sharp in the 4x6
or 4x7 formats.
The APS cameras are most handy in the evenings at restaurants etc. when I
just don't want to haul around a 35mm rig. They capture the moments
perfectly, and I daresay nobody can tell which format was used. A big key,
in my mind, is to stay within the limits of the flash if flash is used. If I
intend to make 8x10 or bigger enlargements, then I tote the 35mm stuff. But
I almost always have an APS camera in a pocket even if I am carrying the
bigger rig.
Ken


This points out an aps feature that is often overlooked. If you don't
have the camera with you then you can't take a picture at all. APS is a
perfect fit for casual non-professional use.

Dale


--
_ _ Dale DePriest
/`) _ // http://users.cwnet.com/dalede
o/_/ (_(_X_(` For GPS and GPS/PDAs

  #8  
Old October 30th 03, 02:08 AM
DaveT
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default APS Sucks.

On Wed, 29 Oct 2003 10:04:53 -0800, Dale DePriest
wrote:
Ken Rosenbaum wrote:

"Ron Andrews" wrote in message
...
I use my SLR when I'm serious about picture taking. On

occasion I will drag out the Crown Graphic and shoot 4x5 sheet film. I
wouldn't try to make a 20x30 enlargement from APS, but sometimes I want
simple snapshots. For that, APS is hard to beat.



Ron,
I can absolutely agree with you. I have complete 35mm systems by Nikon,
Pentax, Canon and Minolta with some of the finest lenses they offer. I
recently used a Canon Elph for just the type of snaps you described. It was
used alternately with a Nikon N8008S and a 24-50 AF Nikkor zoom lens. You
cannot tell the difference in the 4x6 prints I made in the Disney World
area.
I have found the same to be true of my Canon Elph Jr., which offers me a
little more in low-light shooting with its 2.8 lens. Razor sharp in the 4x6
or 4x7 formats.
The APS cameras are most handy in the evenings at restaurants etc. when I
just don't want to haul around a 35mm rig. They capture the moments
perfectly, and I daresay nobody can tell which format was used. A big key,
in my mind, is to stay within the limits of the flash if flash is used. If I
intend to make 8x10 or bigger enlargements, then I tote the 35mm stuff. But
I almost always have an APS camera in a pocket even if I am carrying the
bigger rig.
Ken


This points out an aps feature that is often overlooked. If you don't
have the camera with you then you can't take a picture at all. APS is a
perfect fit for casual non-professional use.

Dale


Absolutely correct. I have an Elph Jr. that carries in a pager-sized
pouch on my belt. It has a razor-sharp four element f2.8 non-zoom
lens that gives a very good account of itself. My main camera is a
Canon A1, but anymore, I take many more pictures with the Elph. I
usually set it to "C" format so I get 4 x 6 prints back. When I mix
up 4 x 6 prints from both cameras, I have to look at the backs to tell
which camera they came from -- even with 400 film.

The A1 is a necessity for close-ups, night shots and other difficult
situations where full control and thru-the-lens viewing is essential,
but for hiking in the woods and casual sightseeing, the convenience
and compact size of the Elph is unbeatable. Not to mention far less
financial risk if something happens to it.

DaveT
  #9  
Old October 30th 03, 06:25 PM
Michael Benveniste
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default APS Sucks.

DaveT wrote in message . ..

This points out an aps feature that is often overlooked. If you don't
have the camera with you then you can't take a picture at all. APS is a
perfect fit for casual non-professional use.

Absolutely correct. I have an Elph Jr. that carries in a pager-sized
pouch on my belt. It has a razor-sharp four element f2.8 non-zoom
lens that gives a very good account of itself. My main camera is a
Canon A1, but anymore, I take many more pictures with the Elph.


APS is one offering to the "grab camera" market, but far from the
only one. Let's compare that Elph Jr. to, say, an Olympus Stylus
Epic 35mm:

Lens:
Elph Jr. -- 26mm 4 element/4 group lens @ f/2.8
Olympus -- 35mm 4 element/4 group lens @ f/2.8
Note -- Elph is roughly equivalent to a 33mm lens for 35mm.

Size:
Elph Jr. -- 3.5" x 2.4" x 0.9" -- 4.4 oz.
Olympus -- 4.3" x 2.3" x 1.5" -- 4.7 oz.

Minimum Focus and required light:
Elph Jr. -- 1.5 feet. EV2
Olympus -- 1.1 feet. EV1

Rangefinder Magnification:
Elph Jr. -- 0.35x
Olympus -- 0.45x

Flash Range at ISO 200:
Elph Jr. -- 17'8"
Olympus -- 19'1"
Note -- These are computed values.
Elph Jr. quotes 12.5' with ISO 100, but ISO 100
numbers are moot unless you can buy ISO 100 film.

Auto Film Loading?
Elph Jr. -- Yes
Olympus -- Almost.

I could go on nit-picking, or I could run similar numbers against
any of a number of small digitals. But to what point? All of them
are roughly the same size, and all will produce a nice looking print
up to about 8x12 or so. The 35mm Epic does better at 11x16, but a
goodly number of users don't really care about that.

So in my mind, we're back to square "A" as in _A_dvanced Photo System.
APS has some nice film handling and recording features. At least in
theory -- the last time I brought a roll of APS into my local
Walgreens, they ignored the H/C/P settings and printed everything as
a 4x6. Twice.

Balance those features against paying a little more for developing
(at least where I live), with fewer choices for film, and the film
goes on sale less often.

Does APS suck? I don't think so, but I also don't think it has
sufficient advantages over 35mm to justify the higher cost, let
alone any decrease in quality. It's even more vulnerable to
competition from digitals.

--
Michael Benveniste --
I've got a Nikon Camera, I love to take a photograph. But Mama
they took my Kodachrome 25 away.
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bestbuy sucks [email protected] Film & Labs 3 February 4th 04 03:00 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 04:39 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2022 PhotoBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.