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Does anybody have an answer?



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 6th 09, 11:33 AM posted to rec.photo.digital
footless crow
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Posts: 11
Default Does anybody have an answer?

I'm not too sure about the practicalities of the modular idea but I
certainly think that the DSLR manufacturers are missing something.
It would be good to see a digital version of an utterly simple but
very high quality camera such as the Nikon FM.
Personally, I have no use for many features e.g. the tft display as I
re-take
the shot if I'm unsure of exposure etc. This is less time consuming than
fiddling about with the tft display controls. As modern DSLRs are festooned
with controls, it's too easy to accidentally put the camera into an
unintended
mode and it's not possible to use an ever-ready case due to the controls
on the back of the camera.

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  #2  
Old June 6th 09, 01:37 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
nospam
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Posts: 24,165
Default Does anybody have an answer?

In article , footless crow
wrote:

I'm not too sure about the practicalities of the modular idea but I
certainly think that the DSLR manufacturers are missing something.
It would be good to see a digital version of an utterly simple but
very high quality camera such as the Nikon FM.
Personally, I have no use for many features e.g. the tft display as I
re-take
the shot if I'm unsure of exposure etc. This is less time consuming than
fiddling about with the tft display controls. As modern DSLRs are festooned
with controls, it's too easy to accidentally put the camera into an
unintended
mode and it's not possible to use an ever-ready case due to the controls
on the back of the camera.


it already exists. get any nikon dslr and set it to 'm' mode, disable
autofocus and don't use the rear lcd for anything. the front and rear
control wheels should be accessible with any type of case that lets you
still shoot. it's also not that easy to accidentally switch modes.
  #3  
Old June 6th 09, 03:13 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
nospam
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Posts: 24,165
Default Does anybody have an answer?

In article
,
sambarluc wrote:

That's more or less what I'm doing, but it's like using a tank to go
to the supermarket.


except that many dslrs are roughly the same size or even smaller than
something like a nikon fm and you don't need to carry dozens of rolls
of film either. not all dslrs are behemoths like the d3 or 1ds.
  #4  
Old June 6th 09, 10:50 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
Eric Stevens
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Posts: 13,611
Default Does anybody have an answer?

On Sat, 6 Jun 2009 10:33:38 GMT, "footless crow"
wrote:

I'm not too sure about the practicalities of the modular idea but I
certainly think that the DSLR manufacturers are missing something.
It would be good to see a digital version of an utterly simple but
very high quality camera such as the Nikon FM.
Personally, I have no use for many features e.g. the tft display as I
re-take
the shot if I'm unsure of exposure etc.


Clearly you have never used one of the modern cameras. There is no
easier way to check the exposure than by viewing the histogram or
having the burned out high-lights indicated.

This is less time consuming than
fiddling about with the tft display controls.


By using the display properly you are not left unsure, you 'know' and
you know both what and why. Thats better than taking another shot on
the grounds that you weren't sure of the last one and hope to be more
sure of the next.

As modern DSLRs are festooned
with controls, it's too easy to accidentally put the camera into an
unintended
mode and it's not possible to use an ever-ready case due to the controls
on the back of the camera.


You are writing rubbish and I strongly suspect you are a troll.



Eric Stevens
  #5  
Old June 7th 09, 04:47 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
footless crow
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Posts: 11
Default Does anybody have an answer?


On 6-Jun-2009, Eric Stevens wrote:

Clearly you have never used one of the modern cameras. There is no
easier way to check the exposure than by viewing the histogram or
having the burned out high-lights indicated.


Clearly, you lose plenty of shots by messing about with histograms.
Yes it's easy to check for over exposure - there's nothing clever
about that- but you still have to correct the shot if you discover over
exp. in the histogram.


This is less time consuming than
fiddling about with the tft display controls.


By using the display properly you are not left unsure, you 'know' and
you know both what and why. Thats better than taking another shot on
the grounds that you weren't sure of the last one and hope to be more
sure of the next.


Useless knowledge if your subject has walked, crawled or run away.



As modern DSLRs are festooned
with controls, it's too easy to accidentally put the camera into an
unintended
mode and it's not possible to use an ever-ready case due to the controls
on the back of the camera.


You are writing rubbish and I strongly suspect you are a troll.


Not even incorrect.

You sound more like a gadget freak than a photographer.

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  #6  
Old June 7th 09, 09:44 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
Eric Stevens
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Posts: 13,611
Default Does anybody have an answer?

On Sun, 7 Jun 2009 15:47:10 GMT, "footless crow"
wrote:


On 6-Jun-2009, Eric Stevens wrote:

Clearly you have never used one of the modern cameras. There is no
easier way to check the exposure than by viewing the histogram or
having the burned out high-lights indicated.


Clearly, you lose plenty of shots by messing about with histograms.
Yes it's easy to check for over exposure - there's nothing clever
about that- but you still have to correct the shot if you discover over
exp. in the histogram.


And of course you don't if you have doubts about the first one. :-(


This is less time consuming than
fiddling about with the tft display controls.


By using the display properly you are not left unsure, you 'know' and
you know both what and why. Thats better than taking another shot on
the grounds that you weren't sure of the last one and hope to be more
sure of the next.


Useless knowledge if your subject has walked, crawled or run away.


Yet you say "I re-take the shot if I'm unsure of exposure etc.". I
suppose you have to walk, crawl or run after your subject.



As modern DSLRs are festooned
with controls, it's too easy to accidentally put the camera into an
unintended
mode and it's not possible to use an ever-ready case due to the controls
on the back of the camera.


You are writing rubbish and I strongly suspect you are a troll.


Not even incorrect.


Double-negative = 'correct'.

You sound more like a gadget freak than a photographer.






Eric Stevens
 




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