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The (American) Bride Wore Red



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 22nd 08, 04:52 AM posted to rec.photo.equipment.35mm
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Posts: 1
Default The (American) Bride Wore Red

Increasing numbers of American brides are thinking about doing
something that used to be unthinkable -- getting married in a bold red
gown.

Not that red is a stranger to marriage -- far from it. Red plays a
major role in Chinese, Hindu, and some Muslim weddings, and was a
popular choice in medieval times. But for modern Westerners? Yes, we
too are starting to marry in red. At least some of us.

It's been happening more and more in Europe over the past decade.
Maybe that's because Europe recalls long stretches of time when
wedding gowns weren't white. For eons, a woman simply wore her best
dress -- one she could certainly use again -- although to keep luck on
her side she might gravitate to certain colors and avoid others. With
all the choices, it was harder to keep the good colors straight, so
the folk world offered a poem with a few fortunate outcomes and many
poor ones:

Married in White, you have chosen right ...
Married in Brown, you will live in the town ...
Married in Blue, you will always be true ...

Blue gowns were popular since early times, since blue represented
purity and the Virgin Mary. This tradition continues in the "something
blue" a bride wears today. White was less common, especially among
anything other than the bluest bluebloods, because of its difficulty
in coming clean in the wash.

But eventually, several big players popularized white, most notably
the fashion hound Queen Victoria. Ever since -- especially in a world
where clothes are mass-produced and a woman can afford many dresses,
even one she'll only wear once -- white's been all the rage.

Yet even more recently, some have found this timeworn symbol of purity
and affluence a little constricting. Some brides want a little less
predictability and more choice. And not everyone looks good in white,
as some brides point out.

While a percentage of European brides have snapped up dramatic red
gowns for the past decade, Americans have been more cautious. It's
only been about the

http://www.dontplayplay.com/html/Bot...002/47462.html

  #2  
Old January 22nd 08, 06:34 AM posted to rec.photo.equipment.35mm
Paul Furman
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Posts: 7,367
Default SPAM, don't bother The (American) Bride Wore Red

wrote:
[random text]
...
www.dontplayplay.../Bothsexes...

SPAM, don't bother, nothing to see but ads.
  #3  
Old January 23rd 08, 06:04 AM posted to rec.photo.equipment.35mm
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Posts: 37
Default The (American) Bride Wore Red

On Jan 21, 8:52*pm, wrote:
Increasing numbers of American brides are thinking about doing
something that used to be unthinkable -- getting married in a bold red
gown.

Not that red is a stranger to marriage -- far from it. Red plays a
major role in Chinese, Hindu, and some Muslim weddings, and was a
popular choice in medieval times. But for modern Westerners? Yes, we
too are starting to marry in red. At least some of us.

It's been happening more and more in Europe over the past decade.
Maybe that's because Europe recalls long stretches of time when
wedding gowns weren't white. For eons, a woman simply wore her best
dress -- one she could certainly use again -- although to keep luck on
her side she might gravitate to certain colors and avoid others. With
all the choices, it was harder to keep the good colors straight, so
the folk world offered a poem with a few fortunate outcomes and many
poor ones:

Married in White, you have chosen right ...
Married in Brown, you will live in the town ...
Married in Blue, you will always be true ...

Blue gowns were popular since early times, since blue represented
purity and the Virgin Mary. This tradition continues in the "something
blue" a bride wears today. White was less common, especially among
anything other than the bluest bluebloods, because of its difficulty
in coming clean in the wash.

But eventually, several big players popularized white, most notably
the fashion hound Queen Victoria. Ever since -- especially in a world
where clothes are mass-produced and a woman can afford many dresses,
even one she'll only wear once -- white's been all the rage.

Yet even more recently, some have found this timeworn symbol of purity
and affluence a little constricting. Some brides want a little less
predictability and more choice. And not everyone looks good in white,
as some brides point out.

While a percentage of European brides have snapped up dramatic red
gowns for the past decade, Americans have been more cautious. It's
only been about the

http://www.dontplayplay.com/html/Bot...002/47462.html



White represents virginity and purity; somthing which most American
couples have
lost a long time ago. A long time ago when women were more likely to
be virgins
in some cultures the man would throw the bloody sheets out the window.

Michael Ragland
  #4  
Old January 23rd 08, 11:05 PM posted to rec.photo.equipment.35mm
Annika1980
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Posts: 4,898
Default The (American) Bride Wore Red

A guy I know took this pic.
(I enhanced it a bit.)

http://members.aol.com/annika1980/tnwedding.jpg

  #5  
Old January 23rd 08, 11:54 PM posted to rec.photo.equipment.35mm
[email protected]
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Posts: 1,758
Default The (American) Bride Wore Red

On Jan 23, 1:04*am, wrote:
On Jan 21, 8:52*pm, wrote:

Increasing numbers of American brides are thinking about doing
something that used to be unthinkable -- getting married in a bold red
gown.


Not that red is a stranger to marriage -- far from it. Red plays a
major role in Chinese, Hindu, and some Muslim weddings, and was a
popular choice in medieval times. But for modern Westerners? Yes, we
too are starting to marry in red. At least some of us.


It's been happening more and more in Europe over the past decade.
Maybe that's because Europe recalls long stretches of time when
wedding gowns weren't white. For eons, a woman simply wore her best
dress -- one she could certainly use again -- although to keep luck on
her side she might gravitate to certain colors and avoid others. With
all the choices, it was harder to keep the good colors straight, so
the folk world offered a poem with a few fortunate outcomes and many
poor ones:


Married in White, you have chosen right ...
Married in Brown, you will live in the town ...
Married in Blue, you will always be true ...


Blue gowns were popular since early times, since blue represented
purity and the Virgin Mary. This tradition continues in the "something
blue" a bride wears today. White was less common, especially among
anything other than the bluest bluebloods, because of its difficulty
in coming clean in the wash.


But eventually, several big players popularized white, most notably
the fashion hound Queen Victoria. Ever since -- especially in a world
where clothes are mass-produced and a woman can afford many dresses,
even one she'll only wear once -- white's been all the rage.


Yet even more recently, some have found this timeworn symbol of purity
and affluence a little constricting. Some brides want a little less
predictability and more choice. And not everyone looks good in white,
as some brides point out.


While a percentage of European brides have snapped up dramatic red
gowns for the past decade, Americans have been more cautious. It's
only been about the


http://www.dontplayplay.com/html/Bot...002/47462.html


White represents virginity and purity; somthing which most American
couples have
lost a long time ago. A long time ago when women were more likely to
be virgins
in some cultures the man would throw the bloody sheets out the window.

Michael Ragland



"White represents virginity and purity; something which most American
couples have
lost a long time ago. A long time ago when women were more likely to
be virgins"

Yes, times have changed drastically from those days.
I'm one of those rare souls who married the guy I lost it to.

"in some cultures the man would throw the bloody sheets out the
window."

How humiliating for the girl! I would be mortified beyond
comprehension.
Helen
  #6  
Old January 24th 08, 01:32 AM posted to rec.photo.equipment.35mm
Pat[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 26
Default The (American) Bride Wore Red

On Jan 23, 6:54 pm, wrote:
On Jan 23, 1:04 am, wrote:



On Jan 21, 8:52 pm, wrote:


Increasing numbers of American brides are thinking about doing
something that used to be unthinkable -- getting married in a bold red
gown.


Not that red is a stranger to marriage -- far from it. Red plays a
major role in Chinese, Hindu, and some Muslim weddings, and was a
popular choice in medieval times. But for modern Westerners? Yes, we
too are starting to marry in red. At least some of us.


It's been happening more and more in Europe over the past decade.
Maybe that's because Europe recalls long stretches of time when
wedding gowns weren't white. For eons, a woman simply wore her best
dress -- one she could certainly use again -- although to keep luck on
her side she might gravitate to certain colors and avoid others. With
all the choices, it was harder to keep the good colors straight, so
the folk world offered a poem with a few fortunate outcomes and many
poor ones:


Married in White, you have chosen right ...
Married in Brown, you will live in the town ...
Married in Blue, you will always be true ...


Blue gowns were popular since early times, since blue represented
purity and the Virgin Mary. This tradition continues in the "something
blue" a bride wears today. White was less common, especially among
anything other than the bluest bluebloods, because of its difficulty
in coming clean in the wash.


But eventually, several big players popularized white, most notably
the fashion hound Queen Victoria. Ever since -- especially in a world
where clothes are mass-produced and a woman can afford many dresses,
even one she'll only wear once -- white's been all the rage.


Yet even more recently, some have found this timeworn symbol of purity
and affluence a little constricting. Some brides want a little less
predictability and more choice. And not everyone looks good in white,
as some brides point out.


While a percentage of European brides have snapped up dramatic red
gowns for the past decade, Americans have been more cautious. It's
only been about the


http://www.dontplayplay.com/html/Bot...002/47462.html


White represents virginity and purity; somthing which most American
couples have
lost a long time ago. A long time ago when women were more likely to
be virgins
in some cultures the man would throw the bloody sheets out the window.


Michael Ragland


"White represents virginity and purity; something which most American
couples have
lost a long time ago. A long time ago when women were more likely to
be virgins"

Yes, times have changed drastically from those days.
I'm one of those rare souls who married the guy I lost it to.

"in some cultures the man would throw the bloody sheets out the
window."

How humiliating for the girl! I would be mortified beyond
comprehension.
Helen


What, you've never seen Yentel? (or is it Yentle, anyway, the movie
with Barbra Streisand)
  #7  
Old January 24th 08, 01:37 AM posted to rec.photo.equipment.35mm
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,758
Default The (American) Bride Wore Red

On Jan 23, 8:32*pm, Pat wrote:
On Jan 23, 6:54 pm, wrote:

On Jan 23, 1:04 am, wrote:


On Jan 21, 8:52 pm, wrote:


Increasing numbers of American brides are thinking about doing
something that used to be unthinkable -- getting married in a bold red
gown.


Not that red is a stranger to marriage -- far from it. Red plays a
major role in Chinese, Hindu, and some Muslim weddings, and was a
popular choice in medieval times. But for modern Westerners? Yes, we
too are starting to marry in red. At least some of us.


It's been happening more and more in Europe over the past decade.
Maybe that's because Europe recalls long stretches of time when
wedding gowns weren't white. For eons, a woman simply wore her best
dress -- one she could certainly use again -- although to keep luck on
her side she might gravitate to certain colors and avoid others. With
all the choices, it was harder to keep the good colors straight, so
the folk world offered a poem with a few fortunate outcomes and many
poor ones:


Married in White, you have chosen right ...
Married in Brown, you will live in the town ...
Married in Blue, you will always be true ...


Blue gowns were popular since early times, since blue represented
purity and the Virgin Mary. This tradition continues in the "something
blue" a bride wears today. White was less common, especially among
anything other than the bluest bluebloods, because of its difficulty
in coming clean in the wash.


But eventually, several big players popularized white, most notably
the fashion hound Queen Victoria. Ever since -- especially in a world
where clothes are mass-produced and a woman can afford many dresses,
even one she'll only wear once -- white's been all the rage.


Yet even more recently, some have found this timeworn symbol of purity
and affluence a little constricting. Some brides want a little less
predictability and more choice. And not everyone looks good in white,
as some brides point out.


While a percentage of European brides have snapped up dramatic red
gowns for the past decade, Americans have been more cautious. It's
only been about the


http://www.dontplayplay.com/html/Bot...002/47462.html


White represents virginity and purity; somthing which most American
couples have
lost a long time ago. A long time ago when women were more likely to
be virgins
in some cultures the man would throw the bloody sheets out the window.


Michael Ragland


"White represents virginity and purity; something which most American
couples have
lost a long time ago. A long time ago when women were more likely to
be virgins"


Yes, times have changed drastically from those days.
I'm one of those rare souls who married the guy I lost it to.


"in some cultures the man would throw the bloody sheets out the
window."


How humiliating for the girl! *I would be mortified beyond
comprehension.
Helen


What, you've never seen Yentel? *(or is it Yentle, anyway, the movie
with Barbra Streisand)


I saw it. Don't agree with it.
 




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