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How to use a hand light-meter?



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 4th 10, 09:22 AM
Darkroom User Darkroom User is offline
Junior Member
 
First recorded activity by PhotoBanter: Aug 2010
Posts: 27
Default How to use a hand light-meter?

I posted this question in the darkroom discussion group, but was told it was not the appropriate group to post, so I will try here in the film & labs section instead.
Film needs to be exposed properly for the best results, so I hope nobody here takes umbrage.

As obtaining correct film exposure is of fundamental importance to provide good negatives, would a hand meter be a worth while investment instead of relying on the TTL metering of my 35mm SLR Camera that I use at the moment?
I also use this to transfer readings across to my Mamiya RB67 medium format camera.
What are the advantages and disadvantages of incident versus reflected measurements?
I would like to know more about using a hand meter before parting with my money.
I saw a Kenko KFM-2100 on-line, but it can be any other models and brands you can think of, as I am not sure what to buy. Please help and advise.
  #2  
Old September 4th 10, 11:40 AM posted to rec.photo.film+labs
Paul Giverin
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12
Default How to use a hand light-meter?

In message , Darkroom User
writes

I posted this question in the darkroom discussion group, but was told
it
was not the appropriate group to post, so I will try here in the film &
labs section instead.


I saw your original post and it made me smile. I've been lurking in that
group for a year or so. It gets about one post a month which is quickly
followed up by a reply stating that the original post was off topic for
the group.

I know that constant OT posts can be a pain in high volume groups but in
near dead groups its not a big issue. You have to wonder if the reason
the group is dead has something to do with the anal replies from the one
or two remaining regulars.

Anyway, I enjoyed your question. I'm still trying to work out if its
worthwhile getting my own light meter repaired. Its a lovely old Weston
Master V complete with invercone which I picked up for a few pounds.
Unfortunately the selenium cell is just about dead and the cost of
getting it replaced is approaching the cost of a modern lightmeter.

--
Paul Giverin

My Photos:- www.pbase.com/vendee
  #3  
Old September 4th 10, 06:12 PM posted to rec.photo.film+labs
K W Hart
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 142
Default How to use a hand light-meter?


"Darkroom User" wrote in message
news

I posted this question in the darkroom discussion group, but was told it
was not the appropriate group to post, so I will try here in the film &
labs section instead.
Film needs to be exposed properly for the best results, so I hope nobody
here takes umbrage.

As obtaining correct film exposure is of fundamental importance to
provide good negatives, would a hand meter be a worth while investment
instead of relying on the TTL metering of my 35mm SLR Camera that I use
at the moment?
I also use this to transfer readings across to my Mamiya RB67 medium
format camera.
What are the advantages and disadvantages of incident versus reflected
measurements?
I would like to know more about using a hand meter before parting with
my money.
I saw a Kenko KFM-2100 on-line, but it can be any other models and
brands you can think of, as I am not sure what to buy. Please help and
advise.


Very generally, a handheld meter is more accurate than one built into the
camera- very generally. A handheld meter might be easier to read and adjust
than the TTL meter.

I usually carry a meter with me-- I read the meter, look at the conditions,
and set the exposure to what I thought it should be without the meter
reading!

A reflected measurement is an overall average reading. An incident
measurement is more specific, and depending on circumstances may be more
accurate. However, in some cases (a picture of the Grand Canyon?), an
incident reading is difficult to impossible.

Keep in mind that the meter wants whatever it measures to be 18% gray. If
you are reading a snow scene, the meter will try to make the snow gray.

As to specific models, you might want to consider a meter that can read
electronic flash, or a spot meter (you look thru it and pick the spot you
want to read); depending on the kind of shooting you do. A digital readout
might be more rugged than a moving needle meter.

Ken Hart


  #4  
Old September 5th 10, 03:07 PM posted to rec.photo.film+labs
Christoph-Erdmann Pfeiler
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5
Default How to use a hand light-meter?

Dear Darkroom User,

Am 04.09.2010 10:22, schrieb Darkroom User:
I posted this question in the darkroom discussion group, but was told it
was not the appropriate group to post, so I will try here in the film &
labs section instead.
Film needs to be exposed properly for the best results, so I hope nobody
here takes umbrage.

As obtaining correct film exposure is of fundamental importance to
provide good negatives, would a hand meter be a worth while investment
instead of relying on the TTL metering of my 35mm SLR Camera that I use
at the moment?


please have a look onto

http://www.gossen-photo.de/english/t..._methoden.html

espically onto

http://www.gossen-photo.de/english/faq_methoden1.html

and

http://www.gossen-photo.de/pdf/digital_e.pdf

You can use a grey card to get a proper calibrated setting with a TTL
exposure meter.

Yours sincerely

Christoph-Erdmann Pfeiler

I also use this to transfer readings across to my Mamiya RB67 medium
format camera.
What are the advantages and disadvantages of incident versus reflected
measurements?
I would like to know more about using a hand meter before parting with
my money.
I saw a Kenko KFM-2100 on-line, but it can be any other models and
brands you can think of, as I am not sure what to buy. Please help and
advise.





  #5  
Old September 5th 10, 03:10 PM posted to rec.photo.film+labs
Christoph-Erdmann Pfeiler
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5
Default How to use a hand light-meter?

O Dear,

I've missed Ansel Adams, see

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zone_System

This is a very good explanation about the theoretical background!

Yours sincerely

Christoph-Erdmann Pfeiler

Am 05.09.2010 16:07, schrieb Christoph-Erdmann Pfeiler:
Dear Darkroom User,

Am 04.09.2010 10:22, schrieb Darkroom User:
I posted this question in the darkroom discussion group, but was told it
was not the appropriate group to post, so I will try here in the film &
labs section instead.
Film needs to be exposed properly for the best results, so I hope nobody
here takes umbrage.

As obtaining correct film exposure is of fundamental importance to
provide good negatives, would a hand meter be a worth while investment
instead of relying on the TTL metering of my 35mm SLR Camera that I use
at the moment?


please have a look onto

http://www.gossen-photo.de/english/t..._methoden.html

espically onto

http://www.gossen-photo.de/english/faq_methoden1.html

and

http://www.gossen-photo.de/pdf/digital_e.pdf

You can use a grey card to get a proper calibrated setting with a TTL
exposure meter.

Yours sincerely

Christoph-Erdmann Pfeiler

I also use this to transfer readings across to my Mamiya RB67 medium
format camera.
What are the advantages and disadvantages of incident versus reflected
measurements?
I would like to know more about using a hand meter before parting with
my money.
I saw a Kenko KFM-2100 on-line, but it can be any other models and
brands you can think of, as I am not sure what to buy. Please help and
advise.






  #6  
Old September 5th 10, 04:27 PM
Keith Tapscott. Keith Tapscott. is offline
Senior Member
 
First recorded activity by PhotoBanter: Feb 2005
Posts: 112
Default

Kodak have a publication about light-meters and how to use them on their website which you might find useful.
http://www.kodak.com/cluster/global/...f9/index.shtml
  #7  
Old October 24th 10, 06:43 PM
Harold Gough Harold Gough is offline
Member
 
First recorded activity by PhotoBanter: Mar 2008
Posts: 31
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by K W Hart View Post
Keep in mind that the meter wants whatever it measures to be 18% gray. If
you are reading a snow scene, the meter will try to make the snow gray.
This is only the case with a reflected light reading. The incident meter reading is independent of the reflectivity of the subject. However, the incident reading should, within the characteristics limits if the flim/sensor, enable the image to show brightness representative of the correct reflectivity of all parts of the subject, including those with 80% reflectivity.
 




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