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archival pigment?



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 12th 15, 03:23 AM posted to rec.photo.digital,alt.photography
Savageduck[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 15,543
Default archival pigment?

On 2015-11-12 03:11:34 +0000, said:

In a local office building, the walls are decorated with a typical corporate
art display. There's a set of prints, mostly landscapes, rather fuzzy,
unfocused, like impressionist paintings. The labels read "Archival pigment
ink photograph"

What does that mean?


It means somebody wanted you to know they didn't just produce the print
on any old consumer inkjet printer.

It also means you have asked the same question in two News Groups by
multi-posting when this would be an appropriate time to cross post to
both alt.photography and r.p.d..

I will add alt.photography to the Newsgroups, so the response below
will appear in both NGs via X-Post.

So for now here is a copy of my response at alt.photography:

It means the print was made on a professional grade printer using
Archival pigment inks on quality paper.
Many pro-level printers are matched with archival inks which are not
found on consumer printers. Epson UltraChrome K3 inks for example.
http://www.epson.com/cgi-bin/Store/Landing/UltraChromeK3.jsp

There is more, these are dated articles, but the information is still valid.
http://phototechmag.com/dye-ink-vs-pigment-ink/
http://www.macworld.com/article/1054216/inktype.html
https://tiptopgallery.wordpress.com/2012/03/13/what-is-an-archival-pigment-print/

Red

River Papers has a list of printers which are capable of using such
inks to produce Archive quality prints.
http://www.redrivercatalog.com/infocenter/tips/list-of-pigment-ink-inkjet-printers.html

--


Regards,

Savageduck

  #2  
Old November 12th 15, 10:33 AM posted to rec.photo.digital,alt.photography
Me
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 470
Default archival pigment?

On 12/11/2015 16:23, Savageduck wrote:
On 2015-11-12 03:11:34 +0000, said:

In a local office building, the walls are decorated with a typical
corporate
art display. There's a set of prints, mostly landscapes, rather fuzzy,
unfocused, like impressionist paintings. The labels read "Archival
pigment
ink photograph"

What does that mean?


It means somebody wanted you to know they didn't just produce the print
on any old consumer inkjet printer.

It also means you have asked the same question in two News Groups by
multi-posting when this would be an appropriate time to cross post to
both alt.photography and r.p.d..

I will add alt.photography to the Newsgroups, so the response below will
appear in both NGs via X-Post.

So for now here is a copy of my response at alt.photography:

It means the print was made on a professional grade printer using
Archival pigment inks on quality paper.
Many pro-level printers are matched with archival inks which are not
found on consumer printers. Epson UltraChrome K3 inks for example.
http://www.epson.com/cgi-bin/Store/Landing/UltraChromeK3.jsp

There is more, these are dated articles, but the information is still
valid.
http://phototechmag.com/dye-ink-vs-pigment-ink/
http://www.macworld.com/article/1054216/inktype.html
https://tiptopgallery.wordpress.com/2012/03/13/what-is-an-archival-pigment-print/


Red
River Papers has a list of printers which are capable of using such inks
to produce Archive quality prints.
http://www.redrivercatalog.com/infocenter/tips/list-of-pigment-ink-inkjet-printers.html


To put some perspective to it (perhaps), I've lived in the same house
for 30 years.
Cibachrome prints framed behind (non-museum) glass had faded
significantly after 10 years.
Epson pigment (R1800) prints hung in the same position for 10 years,
block-mounted (no glass) show no sign of fading. It's possible that
there's been some colour shift, but I'd need to reprint and compare side
by side to see it. Epson K3 inks are better (longevity) than the inks
used in the old R1800.
Tested in the same conditions (accelerated tests) about the best
wet-process colour prints (Fuji Crystal Archive) last about 40 years, vs
100 years for pigment inkjet prints.


 




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