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Archival CDs and DVDs



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 26th 10, 01:02 AM posted to rec.photo.digital.slr-systems
Michael D. Berger
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Posts: 43
Default Archival CDs and DVDs

Any advice on which archival CDs and DVDs are good;
that is, really archival?

Thanks,
Mike.
  #2  
Old May 26th 10, 01:59 AM posted to rec.photo.digital.slr-systems
Peter[_7_]
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Posts: 2,078
Default Archival CDs and DVDs

"Michael D. Berger" wrote in message
...
Any advice on which archival CDs and DVDs are good;
that is, really archival?

Thanks,
Mike.



None. All have limited life and must be re-archived after a period of years,
which varies with the quality of the media and storage conditions.



--
Peter

  #3  
Old May 26th 10, 03:04 AM posted to rec.photo.digital.slr-systems
Michael D. Berger
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Posts: 43
Default Archival CDs and DVDs

On Tue, 25 May 2010 20:59:50 -0400, Peter wrote:

"Michael D. Berger" wrote in message
...
Any advice on which archival CDs and DVDs are good; that is, really
archival?

Thanks,
Mike.



None. All have limited life and must be re-archived after a period of
years, which varies with the quality of the media and storage
conditions.


Ah yes, we are, after all, finite beings -- but I would
guess that some are substantially better than others. It
is the names of those better ones I seek.

Mike.
  #4  
Old May 28th 10, 02:50 PM posted to rec.photo.digital.slr-systems
Peter[_7_]
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Posts: 2,078
Default Archival CDs and DVDs

"John A." wrote in message
...
On 26 May 2010 02:04:46 GMT, "Michael D. Berger"
wrote:

On Tue, 25 May 2010 20:59:50 -0400, Peter wrote:

"Michael D. Berger" wrote in message
...
Any advice on which archival CDs and DVDs are good; that is, really
archival?

Thanks,
Mike.


None. All have limited life and must be re-archived after a period of
years, which varies with the quality of the media and storage
conditions.


Ah yes, we are, after all, finite beings -- but I would
guess that some are substantially better than others. It
is the names of those better ones I seek.


Cranberry claims their DiamonDisc system makes DVDs that will last
1000 years. Instead of storing the data on a dye layer, they use
synthetic stone and etch deeper pits with a higher powered laser.
Write-once, I would imagine. I haven't tried them.

I've also read of one long-term data storage currently in the
theoretical stage. They described a system of carbon nanotubes each
holding an iron particle which would have a theoretical life of a
billion years. I'm sure it would be great for thumb drives, and since
it's the position of the iron in the tube that stores the data it
would probably be easier to securely erase than magnetic systems. But
a 1000-year system would probably be sufficient for most people.



Even twenty years from now the equipment to read the DVD might not be
readily available. Think 8 track.

--
Peter

  #5  
Old May 28th 10, 06:50 PM posted to rec.photo.digital.slr-systems
Peter[_7_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,078
Default Archival CDs and DVDs

"John A." wrote in message
...
On Fri, 28 May 2010 09:50:54 -0400, "Peter"
wrote:

"John A." wrote in message
. ..
On 26 May 2010 02:04:46 GMT, "Michael D. Berger"
wrote:

On Tue, 25 May 2010 20:59:50 -0400, Peter wrote:

"Michael D. Berger" wrote in message
...
Any advice on which archival CDs and DVDs are good; that is, really
archival?

Thanks,
Mike.


None. All have limited life and must be re-archived after a period of
years, which varies with the quality of the media and storage
conditions.

Ah yes, we are, after all, finite beings -- but I would
guess that some are substantially better than others. It
is the names of those better ones I seek.

Cranberry claims their DiamonDisc system makes DVDs that will last
1000 years. Instead of storing the data on a dye layer, they use
synthetic stone and etch deeper pits with a higher powered laser.
Write-once, I would imagine. I haven't tried them.

I've also read of one long-term data storage currently in the
theoretical stage. They described a system of carbon nanotubes each
holding an iron particle which would have a theoretical life of a
billion years. I'm sure it would be great for thumb drives, and since
it's the position of the iron in the tube that stores the data it
would probably be easier to securely erase than magnetic systems. But
a 1000-year system would probably be sufficient for most people.



Even twenty years from now the equipment to read the DVD might not be
readily available. Think 8 track.


DVD readers are dirt cheap. If your data is important enough to
preserve, get spares.



And the DVD readers link to ?

Wanna buy some 8" floppy drives ;-)

--
Peter

  #6  
Old May 28th 10, 07:58 PM posted to rec.photo.digital.slr-systems
Alan Browne
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12,640
Default Archival CDs and DVDs

On 10-05-25 20:02 , Michael D. Berger wrote:
Any advice on which archival CDs and DVDs are good;
that is, really archival?


The "most" archival are the "gold" CD and DVD's with claimed lives in
excess of 100 years in benign conditions (dark, cool, dry).

However, it is best to be sure that they are manufactured in Japan or
Taiwan. Those made in India have a poor reputation for edge sealing.

Common CD/DVD's are good for 5 - 10 maybe 15 years in the same benign
conditions.


--
gmail originated posts are filtered due to spam.
  #7  
Old May 28th 10, 10:45 PM posted to rec.photo.digital.slr-systems
Alan Browne
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12,640
Default Archival CDs and DVDs

On 10-05-28 9:15 , John A. wrote:

I wonder if they are actually repackaging this product:
http://www.millenniata.com/



Very interesting. Thanks



--
gmail originated posts are filtered due to spam.
  #8  
Old May 29th 10, 03:54 PM posted to rec.photo.digital.slr-systems
Alan Browne
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12,640
Default Archival CDs and DVDs

On 10-05-28 9:50 , Peter wrote:
"John A." wrote in message
...
On 26 May 2010 02:04:46 GMT, "Michael D. Berger"
wrote:

On Tue, 25 May 2010 20:59:50 -0400, Peter wrote:

"Michael D. Berger" wrote in message
...
Any advice on which archival CDs and DVDs are good; that is, really
archival?

Thanks,
Mike.


None. All have limited life and must be re-archived after a period of
years, which varies with the quality of the media and storage
conditions.

Ah yes, we are, after all, finite beings -- but I would
guess that some are substantially better than others. It
is the names of those better ones I seek.


Cranberry claims their DiamonDisc system makes DVDs that will last
1000 years. Instead of storing the data on a dye layer, they use
synthetic stone and etch deeper pits with a higher powered laser.
Write-once, I would imagine. I haven't tried them.

I've also read of one long-term data storage currently in the
theoretical stage. They described a system of carbon nanotubes each
holding an iron particle which would have a theoretical life of a
billion years. I'm sure it would be great for thumb drives, and since
it's the position of the iron in the tube that stores the data it
would probably be easier to securely erase than magnetic systems. But
a 1000-year system would probably be sufficient for most people.



Even twenty years from now the equipment to read the DVD might not be
readily available. Think 8 track.



Bad analogy. Unlike tape systems each new optical disk system is
backward compatible. eg: bluray disk readers read DVD and CD disks (and
many data formats on each).

Secondly, the drive mechanisms and lasers in such readers are pretty
much "age proof". Brushless DC motors last pretty much forever and the
lasers almost never fail in normal use. As long as the power supplies
avoid tantalum capacitors (which is becoming an industry practice), the
drives can be re-activated in 10's - 100's of years, IMO.

Oh, maybe the rubber drive band for the door will degrade. No biggie.

--
gmail originated posts are filtered due to spam.
  #9  
Old May 29th 10, 03:59 PM posted to rec.photo.digital.slr-systems
Alan Browne
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12,640
Default Archival CDs and DVDs

On 10-05-28 9:06 , John A. wrote:
On 26 May 2010 02:04:46 GMT, "Michael D. Berger"
wrote:

On Tue, 25 May 2010 20:59:50 -0400, Peter wrote:

"Michael D. wrote in message
...
Any advice on which archival CDs and DVDs are good; that is, really
archival?

Thanks,
Mike.


None. All have limited life and must be re-archived after a period of
years, which varies with the quality of the media and storage
conditions.


Ah yes, we are, after all, finite beings -- but I would
guess that some are substantially better than others. It
is the names of those better ones I seek.


Cranberry claims their DiamonDisc system makes DVDs that will last
1000 years. Instead of storing the data on a dye layer, they use
synthetic stone and etch deeper pits with a higher powered laser.
Write-once, I would imagine. I haven't tried them.

I've also read of one long-term data storage currently in the
theoretical stage. They described a system of carbon nanotubes each
holding an iron particle which would have a theoretical life of a
billion years. I'm sure it would be great for thumb drives, and since
it's the position of the iron in the tube that stores the data it
would probably be easier to securely erase than magnetic systems. But
a 1000-year system would probably be sufficient for most people.



I just perused the NAWC China Lake report, the Millentia disk kick butt
big time. They ran a very aggressive accelerated life cycle test and
only the Millentia's passed.

Misubishi and Verbatim were absolute failures.

Delkin and MAM-A failed, but at least there was probably a lot of
readable data on the disks.

25 disks ea, Mitsubishi, Verbatim 0% survival.
Delkin 45% survival
Millentia: 100% survival.

I'm trying to get pricing from Millenntia. Just wished they did this in
BluRay. A DVD doesn't hold very much and I suspect this technology
doesn't lend itself to dual layer...

--
gmail originated posts are filtered due to spam.
  #10  
Old May 31st 10, 02:03 AM posted to rec.photo.digital.slr-systems
Michael D. Berger
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 43
Default Archival CDs and DVDs

On Fri, 28 May 2010 09:15:48 -0400, John A. wrote:

[...]

I wonder if they are actually repackaging this product:
http://www.millenniata.com/


How about a compromise? Perhaps not quite as reliable,
but lest costly?

Thanks,
Mike.
 




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