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The new Kodak E100 film requires an 81b or 81c in the shade or using flash?



 
 
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  #1  
Old April 22nd 19, 07:53 PM posted to rec.photo.darkroom
[email protected]
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Posts: 7
Default The new Kodak E100 film requires an 81b or 81c in the shade or using flash?

The new Kodak E100 film requires an 81b or 81c in the shade or using flash?
  #2  
Old April 29th 19, 08:08 AM posted to rec.photo.darkroom
dimitris tzortzakakis
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Posts: 15
Default The new Kodak E100 film requires an 81b or 81c in the shade orusing flash?

" Wrote in message:
The new Kodak E100 film requires an 81b or 81c in the shade or using flash?


Isn't it a daylight film?( I don't think there are anymore
tungsten films,oreven tungsten lighting).then it needs
nothing.
--
t


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  #3  
Old June 5th 19, 03:47 PM posted to rec.photo.darkroom
dimitris tzortzakakis
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Posts: 15
Default The new Kodak E100 film requires an 81b or 81c in the shade orusing flash?

" Wrote in message:
The new Kodak E100 film requires an 81b or 81c in the shade or using flash?


Actually after looking at my reference book it.s 81A for shadow or
flash for daylight film but those filters are hard to find
now
--
t


----Android NewsGroup Reader----
http://usenet.sinaapp.com/
  #5  
Old May 24th 20, 05:31 PM posted to rec.photo.darkroom
dale
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Posts: 187
Default The new Kodak E100 film requires an 81b or 81c in the shade orusing flash?

On 5/24/2020 9:34 AM, wrote:
On Saturday, May 23, 2020 at 6:31:16 PM UTC-7, dale wrote:
On 5/22/2020 9:16 PM,
wrote:
Flashes are daylight balanced, so you don't need a filter for correct color balance. If you didn't use a flash and photographed in the shade, the slide or transparency would just be a bit cool (err to blue.) Back in the day if you were to project that slide, the minor color shift might matter. Today, unless you are looking for color critical slides to project in an old school projector, don't worry one bit.



aren't there different color temperatures of daylight?

5000K, 6500K, 9000K, etc.?



On Wednesday, June 5, 2019 at 7:47:49 AM UTC-7, dimitris tzortzakakis wrote:
" Wrote in message:
The new Kodak E100 film requires an 81b or 81c in the shade or using flash?


Actually after looking at my reference book it.s 81A for shadow or
flash for daylight film but those filters are hard to find
now
--
t


----Android NewsGroup Reader----
http://usenet.sinaapp.com/



--
Minister Dale Kelly, Ph.D.
https://www.dalekelly.org/
Board Certified Holistic Health Practitioner
Board Certified Alternative Medical Practitioner


Sure, all sorts of colors of light exist under the sun. But back in the day when they were developing color film for the first time (pun ;-) ) they settled on the average color of daylight on a sunny day. Alternatively there was tungsten film balanced for the artificial lighting of the day. Strobes were balanced to mimic daylight.

If you wanted correct color before digital, you'd have to use one of those two films, then use filters to correct. The filters you mentioned were for shade, and there were others for florescent lighting, using daylight film under tungsten lights, etc. And for precise color corrections you might also need a color meter and CC filters that just add colors by increments (5y, 10m etc.) Minor corrections to color were also necessary when reciprocity failure kicked in addition to exposure.

This may have been a long answer that has little utility to you however. Maybe what you mean is if you're photographing somebody in the shade with daylight film and a flash- what happens to the color balance. The answer is that the areas illuminated by the flash will have the correct color balance, whereas the areas of the photo illuminated by natural light may err to the cool side. If you are using the flash as fill, the differences are likely to be subtle.

Sorry for the long winded response, does that make sense?


Yes, thank you !

Am I right that different positions of the Sun, ahead and above for
instance, have different color temperatures? I can't remember but I
think one is D5000 and the other is D65000

my current endeavors don't get into the professional considerations


--
Minister Dale Kelly, Ph.D.
https://www.dalekelly.org/
Board Certified Holistic Health Practitioner
Board Certified Alternative Medical Practitioner
  #6  
Old May 24th 20, 07:21 PM posted to rec.photo.darkroom
dale
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 187
Default The new Kodak E100 film requires an 81b or 81c in the shade orusing flash?

On 5/24/2020 12:43 PM, wrote:
On Sunday, May 24, 2020 at 9:31:33 AM UTC-7, dale wrote:
On 5/24/2020 9:34 AM,
wrote:
On Saturday, May 23, 2020 at 6:31:16 PM UTC-7, dale wrote:
On 5/22/2020 9:16 PM,
wrote:
Flashes are daylight balanced, so you don't need a filter for correct color balance. If you didn't use a flash and photographed in the shade, the slide or transparency would just be a bit cool (err to blue.) Back in the day if you were to project that slide, the minor color shift might matter. Today, unless you are looking for color critical slides to project in an old school projector, don't worry one bit.


aren't there different color temperatures of daylight?

5000K, 6500K, 9000K, etc.?



On Wednesday, June 5, 2019 at 7:47:49 AM UTC-7, dimitris tzortzakakis wrote:
" Wrote in message:
The new Kodak E100 film requires an 81b or 81c in the shade or using flash?


Actually after looking at my reference book it.s 81A for shadow or
flash for daylight film but those filters are hard to find
now
--
t


----Android NewsGroup Reader----
http://usenet.sinaapp.com/



--
Minister Dale Kelly, Ph.D.
https://www.dalekelly.org/
Board Certified Holistic Health Practitioner
Board Certified Alternative Medical Practitioner

Sure, all sorts of colors of light exist under the sun. But back in the day when they were developing color film for the first time (pun ;-) ) they settled on the average color of daylight on a sunny day. Alternatively there was tungsten film balanced for the artificial lighting of the day. Strobes were balanced to mimic daylight.

If you wanted correct color before digital, you'd have to use one of those two films, then use filters to correct. The filters you mentioned were for shade, and there were others for florescent lighting, using daylight film under tungsten lights, etc. And for precise color corrections you might also need a color meter and CC filters that just add colors by increments (5y, 10m etc.) Minor corrections to color were also necessary when reciprocity failure kicked in addition to exposure.

This may have been a long answer that has little utility to you however. Maybe what you mean is if you're photographing somebody in the shade with daylight film and a flash- what happens to the color balance. The answer is that the areas illuminated by the flash will have the correct color balance, whereas the areas of the photo illuminated by natural light may err to the cool side. If you are using the flash as fill, the differences are likely to be subtle.

Sorry for the long winded response, does that make sense?


Yes, thank you !

Am I right that different positions of the Sun, ahead and above for
instance, have different color temperatures? I can't remember but I
think one is D5000 and the other is D65000

my current endeavors don't get into the professional considerations


--
Minister Dale Kelly, Ph.D.
https://www.dalekelly.org/
Board Certified Holistic Health Practitioner
Board Certified Alternative Medical Practitioner


Yes, the color of sunlight is warmer as it's lower on the horizon, going into shade is cooler. I found this link that seems to illustrate the issue well: https://www.shutterstock.com/blog/ke...20Shutterstock


Thanks again !!!

--
Minister Dale Kelly, Ph.D.
https://www.dalekelly.org/
Board Certified Holistic Health Practitioner
Board Certified Alternative Medical Practitioner
  #7  
Old May 25th 20, 12:18 AM posted to rec.photo.darkroom
Ken Hart[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 569
Default The new Kodak E100 film requires an 81b or 81c in the shade orusing flash?

On 5/24/20 12:43 PM, wrote:
On Sunday, May 24, 2020 at 9:31:33 AM UTC-7, dale wrote:
On 5/24/2020 9:34 AM,
wrote:
On Saturday, May 23, 2020 at 6:31:16 PM UTC-7, dale wrote:
On 5/22/2020 9:16 PM,
wrote:
Flashes are daylight balanced, so you don't need a filter for correct color balance. If you didn't use a flash and photographed in the shade, the slide or transparency would just be a bit cool (err to blue.) Back in the day if you were to project that slide, the minor color shift might matter. Today, unless you are looking for color critical slides to project in an old school projector, don't worry one bit.


aren't there different color temperatures of daylight?

5000K, 6500K, 9000K, etc.?



On Wednesday, June 5, 2019 at 7:47:49 AM UTC-7, dimitris tzortzakakis wrote:
" Wrote in message:
The new Kodak E100 film requires an 81b or 81c in the shade or using flash?


Actually after looking at my reference book it.s 81A for shadow or
flash for daylight film but those filters are hard to find
now
--
t


----Android NewsGroup Reader----
http://usenet.sinaapp.com/



--
Minister Dale Kelly, Ph.D.
https://www.dalekelly.org/
Board Certified Holistic Health Practitioner
Board Certified Alternative Medical Practitioner

Sure, all sorts of colors of light exist under the sun. But back in the day when they were developing color film for the first time (pun ;-) ) they settled on the average color of daylight on a sunny day. Alternatively there was tungsten film balanced for the artificial lighting of the day. Strobes were balanced to mimic daylight.

If you wanted correct color before digital, you'd have to use one of those two films, then use filters to correct. The filters you mentioned were for shade, and there were others for florescent lighting, using daylight film under tungsten lights, etc. And for precise color corrections you might also need a color meter and CC filters that just add colors by increments (5y, 10m etc.) Minor corrections to color were also necessary when reciprocity failure kicked in addition to exposure.

This may have been a long answer that has little utility to you however. Maybe what you mean is if you're photographing somebody in the shade with daylight film and a flash- what happens to the color balance. The answer is that the areas illuminated by the flash will have the correct color balance, whereas the areas of the photo illuminated by natural light may err to the cool side. If you are using the flash as fill, the differences are likely to be subtle.

Sorry for the long winded response, does that make sense?


Yes, thank you !

Am I right that different positions of the Sun, ahead and above for
instance, have different color temperatures? I can't remember but I
think one is D5000 and the other is D65000

my current endeavors don't get into the professional considerations


--
Minister Dale Kelly, Ph.D.
https://www.dalekelly.org/
Board Certified Holistic Health Practitioner
Board Certified Alternative Medical Practitioner


Yes, the color of sunlight is warmer as it's lower on the horizon, going into shade is cooler. I found this link that seems to illustrate the issue well: https://www.shutterstock.com/blog/ke...20Shutterstock


Additionally, the surroundings may affect the color. For example, if
your subject is partially illuminated by sunlight reflected from a blue
wall, the subject may have a blue tint.

--
Ken Hart

  #8  
Old May 25th 20, 12:46 AM posted to rec.photo.darkroom
dale
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 187
Default The new Kodak E100 film requires an 81b or 81c in the shade orusing flash?

On 5/24/2020 7:18 PM, Ken Hart wrote:
On 5/24/20 12:43 PM, wrote:
On Sunday, May 24, 2020 at 9:31:33 AM UTC-7, dale wrote:
On 5/24/2020 9:34 AM,
wrote:
On Saturday, May 23, 2020 at 6:31:16 PM UTC-7, dale wrote:
On 5/22/2020 9:16 PM,
wrote:
Flashes are daylight balanced, so you don't need a filter for
correct color balance. If you didn't use a flash and photographed
in the shade, the slide or transparency would just be a bit cool
(err to blue.) Back in the day if you were to project that slide,
the minor color shift might matter. Today, unless you are looking
for color critical slides to project in an old school projector,
don't worry one bit.


aren't there different color temperatures of daylight?

5000K, 6500K, 9000K, etc.?



On Wednesday, June 5, 2019 at 7:47:49 AM UTC-7, dimitris
tzortzakakis wrote:
" Wrote in
message:
The new Kodak E100 film requires an 81b or 81c in the shade or
using flash?


Actually after looking at my reference book it.s 81A for shadow or
*** flash for daylight film but those filters are hard to find
*** now
--
t


----Android NewsGroup Reader----
http://usenet.sinaapp.com/



--
Minister Dale Kelly, Ph.D.
https://www.dalekelly.org/
Board Certified Holistic Health Practitioner
Board Certified Alternative Medical Practitioner

Sure, all sorts of colors of light exist under the sun. But back in
the day when they were developing color film for the first time (pun
;-) ) they settled on the average color of daylight on a sunny day.
Alternatively there was tungsten film balanced for the artificial
lighting of the day. Strobes were balanced to mimic daylight.

If you wanted correct color before digital, you'd have to use one of
those two films, then use filters to correct. The filters you
mentioned were for shade, and there were others for florescent
lighting, using daylight film under tungsten lights, etc. And for
precise color corrections you might also need a color meter and CC
filters that just add colors by increments (5y, 10m etc.) Minor
corrections to color were also necessary when reciprocity failure
kicked in addition to exposure.

This may have been a long answer that has little utility to you
however. Maybe what you mean is if you're photographing somebody in
the shade with daylight film and a flash- what happens to the color
balance. The answer is that the areas illuminated by the flash will
have the correct color balance, whereas the areas of the photo
illuminated by natural light may err to the cool side. If you are
using the flash as fill, the differences are likely to be subtle.

Sorry for the long winded response, does that make sense?


Yes, thank you !

Am I right that different positions of the Sun, ahead and above for
instance, have different color temperatures? I can't remember but I
think one is D5000 and the other is D65000

my current endeavors don't get into the professional considerations


--
Minister Dale Kelly, Ph.D.
https://www.dalekelly.org/
Board Certified Holistic Health Practitioner
Board Certified Alternative Medical Practitioner


Yes, the color of sunlight is warmer as it's lower on the horizon,
going into shade is cooler. I found this link that seems to illustrate
the issue well:
https://www.shutterstock.com/blog/ke...20Shutterstock



Additionally, the surroundings may affect the color. For example, if
your subject is partially illuminated by sunlight reflected from a blue
wall, the subject may have a blue tint.


then there are appearance considerations within a photo

--
Minister Dale Kelly, Ph.D.
https://www.dalekelly.org/
Board Certified Holistic Health Practitioner
Board Certified Alternative Medical Practitioner
 




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