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A question for Applefans



 
 
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  #131  
Old September 17th 15, 07:02 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
Savageduck[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 15,569
Default A question for Applefans

On 2015-09-17 17:42:25 +0000, Tony Cooper said:

Long ago and far away I dated a girl who was of Sicilian descent. I
was invited to their house for Thanksgiving dinner. Several
Italian/Sicilian dishes were served. I was completely full when they
cleared the table and brought out a turkey and the traditional
American Thanksgiving dishes.

The one thing you don't do in a household like that is not eat the
hostess's cooking. Not a Sicilian hostess's cooking. Not with three
large and menacing brothers and the father sitting there who were not
at all happy that the girl was dating someone who wasn't Sicilian.


That reminds me of an officer and sergeant I worked with. They were a
classic odd pair. The sergeant was a tall skinny white guy and the
officer was a short Hispanic with, to put it kindly, a low center of
gravity. They went on a hunting vacation together to Montana, and the
sergeant couldn't wait to tell us what happened when they had a meal at
a rural eatery.
When asked the officer, who was the only very obviously Hispanic in the
place, ordered chicken fried steak and mashed potatoes and qualified
his order with, "...but hold the gravy". The response to that remark
was for every stetson crowned head in the place to whip around to stare
at the individual who had dared to sully their eating place's gravy.

He was then asked what he would like to drink, and he said, I'd like a
glass of Zinfandel. The waiter looked at him and said, "What did you
call me? You'll have a beer, or whiskey like everybody else and like
it!"

It was one of those "a stranger walked into the bar" moments.


--
Regards,

Savageduck

  #132  
Old September 17th 15, 08:14 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
PeterN[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,254
Default A question for Applefans

On 9/17/2015 1:23 PM, -hh wrote:
peterN wrote:
PAS wrote:
"PeterN" wrote:

[editing]
But it's not a pasta sauce.

True, but it is a gravy that is red and tomato-based.


Last night I was with two of my Italian friends. I
specifically asked them about gravy on pasta. One of them,
the guy from Venice, winced, ...


Any particular idea why?

FWIW, if memory serves, the Venetian region is more about
seafood & rice, not classical pasta.


He feels sauce should attenuate the flavor of the dish. He and I agree
that too many restaurants try to cover up lack of freshness, with excess
sauce.



...but the other, said some of his other friends call red
pasta sauce, gravy. I had not heard about that before.
The things one learns around here.


Something to keep in mind when color-balancing when a
customer says that its a photo of his mom's gravy ;-)

-hh



--
PeterN
  #133  
Old September 17th 15, 08:16 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
PeterN[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,254
Default A question for Applefans

On 9/17/2015 1:42 PM, Tony Cooper wrote:
On Thu, 17 Sep 2015 12:31:17 -0400, "PAS"
wrote:

"PeterN" wrote in message
...
On 9/17/2015 9:54 AM, PAS wrote:
"PeterN" wrote in message
...
On 9/16/2015 11:40 AM, PAS wrote:
"PeterN" wrote in message
...
On 9/15/2015 4:07 PM, Tony Cooper wrote:
On Tue, 15 Sep 2015 15:10:38 -0400, PeterN

wrote:

On 9/15/2015 1:18 PM, Tony Cooper wrote:
On Tue, 15 Sep 2015 13:10:53 -0400, PeterN

wrote:

On 9/14/2015 10:13 PM, Savageduck wrote:
On 2015-09-15 01:58:11 +0000, PeterN
said:

On 9/13/2015 11:15 AM, Tony Cooper wrote:
On Sun, 13 Sep 2015 10:47:25 -0400, PeterN

wrote:

On 9/12/2015 12:37 AM, nospam wrote:
In article ,
Tony
Cooper
wrote:

You research toasters, too?

toasters are commodity products. there's not a whole lot
of
research to
do.



there are differences between brands. Many do not do
English
muffins
well. Some are harder to clean and use than others.

We have a toaster, but it's stowed away in a cabinet and
seldom
used.
Toasting is done using a toaster oven, and the toaster oven
is
capable
of cooking much more than just toast.

The last time I remember the toaster being brought out was
a
Sunday
morning when my daughter, my son-in-law, my son, my
daughter-in-law,
and the grandchildren were over and a late breakfast was
served. To
keep up with toast demand, both appliances were used.


We haven't had a toaster in years. We use a convection oven
that
can
function as a toaster.

Here I was thinking you were going to say, bread on a stick
over
an open
fire.

Been there, done that.
Beats SOS though. There was one guy in my unit that actually
liked
SOS.

While we didn't serve together, I was one who looked forward to
SOS on
the menu at mess.


There's gotta be one in every unit. If you come from a small
town,
you'll be the one. Us city guys have different tastes.

I grew up in Indianapolis but lived in Chicago went I went off to
Ft
Leonard Wood.

There are two types of SOS: one has chipped beef as the "****"
and
the other has ground hamburger as the beef. I never like the
chipped
beef version because chipped beef is too salty for my taste. The
cooks at Ft Leonard Wood used ground beef. The shingle, of
course, is
common to both and is a slice of toast.

I was stationed at Ft. Knox then Ft. Gordon. In both places it was
over salted creamed chipped beef on toast.


It's difficult to prepare good food when your measuring cup is a
55 gl
drum, but the Ft Leonard Wood cooks turned out some decent meals.

Actually easier. Small mistakes don't drastically change the
taste.


My wife prepares what looks like SOS at times, but uses sausage
(pork)
instead of beef and biscuits instead of toast. It's the
traditional
southern biscuits and gravy.

Big difference. What your wife makes sounds quite edible. On my
Southern trips I go out of my way to order grits, and white gravy
with
biscuits and fried chicken. Though one of my favorite Southern
foods
is fried green tomatoes.


Do you also like
poutine? What about Haggis?

Neither were ever on the menu at Ft Leonard Wood. I've had both,
but
wouldn't go out of my way to have either again. Gravy on french
fries
is a common thing in the UK, but the cheese curd ingredient is
more
likely to be found in Quebec. I tried Haggis when I was in
Scotland,
and found it not disgusting but didn't ask for a recipe.

You Easterners, at least some of you, call red sauce as served
with
spaghetti "gravy" and put gravy on your pasta. It sounds bad to
these
Midwestern ears, but doesn't taste bad.

You are also an Easterner. I have several meals in every Eastern
state
and have never heard of tomato sauce being called gravy.
I have eaten enough meals with my Italian friends to know the
difference. I will usually not eat pasta in a diner, and like it
al
dente.

I kow lots of our fellow Long Islanders who are of Italian descent
that
refer to tomato sauce as gravy.

We must know different ones. I have friends who are native to
Venice,
Naples and Sardinia. I also have Sicilian friends, but not all of
them
like to be referred to as Italian. I have been in their homes, and
have never heard tomato sauce for pasta called gravy.

Those whom I know that refer to tomato sauce as "gravy" are all
Americans of Italian heritage, no native Italians. Perhaps it's an
Americanized thing.


Gravy, to me, is either brown (meat based) or white (chicken
based).
It is not red or tomato based.

Same here. To me, tomato sauce and gravy are too different things.
However, there are exceptions to that. My wife makes a Greek dish
called Muscari that is like a beef stew and she adds a tomato sauce
based gravy to it after it's cooked.


But it's not a pasta sauce.

True, but it is a gravy that is red and tomato-based.

Last night I was with two of my Italian friends. I specifically asked
them about gravy on pasta. One of them, the guy from Venice, winced,
but the other, said some of his other friends call red pasta sauce,
gravy. I had not heard about that before. The things one learns around
here.


Not only was it "gravy" in Uncle Al's house, but pasta was always served
at every Thanksgiving dinner. Same for some of my friends.


Long ago and far away I dated a girl who was of Sicilian descent. I
was invited to their house for Thanksgiving dinner. Several
Italian/Sicilian dishes were served. I was completely full when they
cleared the table and brought out a turkey and the traditional
American Thanksgiving dishes.

The one thing you don't do in a household like that is not eat the
hostess's cooking. Not a Sicilian hostess's cooking. Not with three
large and menacing brothers and the father sitting there who were not
at all happy that the girl was dating someone who wasn't Sicilian.


Very wise decision.


--
PeterN
  #134  
Old September 17th 15, 08:20 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
PeterN[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,254
Default A question for Applefans

On 9/17/2015 2:02 PM, Savageduck wrote:
On 2015-09-17 17:42:25 +0000, Tony Cooper said:

Long ago and far away I dated a girl who was of Sicilian descent. I
was invited to their house for Thanksgiving dinner. Several
Italian/Sicilian dishes were served. I was completely full when they
cleared the table and brought out a turkey and the traditional
American Thanksgiving dishes.

The one thing you don't do in a household like that is not eat the
hostess's cooking. Not a Sicilian hostess's cooking. Not with three
large and menacing brothers and the father sitting there who were not
at all happy that the girl was dating someone who wasn't Sicilian.


That reminds me of an officer and sergeant I worked with. They were a
classic odd pair. The sergeant was a tall skinny white guy and the
officer was a short Hispanic with, to put it kindly, a low center of
gravity. They went on a hunting vacation together to Montana, and the
sergeant couldn't wait to tell us what happened when they had a meal at
a rural eatery.
When asked the officer, who was the only very obviously Hispanic in the
place, ordered chicken fried steak and mashed potatoes and qualified his
order with, "...but hold the gravy". The response to that remark was for
every stetson crowned head in the place to whip around to stare at the
individual who had dared to sully their eating place's gravy.

He was then asked what he would like to drink, and he said, I'd like a
glass of Zinfandel. The waiter looked at him and said, "What did you
call me? You'll have a beer, or whiskey like everybody else and like it!"

It was one of those "a stranger walked into the bar" moments.



Y Our ending surprised me. I was expecting him to say: " I'll have a
sarsaparilla."

--
PeterN
  #135  
Old September 17th 15, 08:48 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
PAS
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 480
Default A question for Applefans

"PeterN" wrote in message
...
On 9/17/2015 1:42 PM, Tony Cooper wrote:
On Thu, 17 Sep 2015 12:31:17 -0400, "PAS"
wrote:

"PeterN" wrote in message
...
On 9/17/2015 9:54 AM, PAS wrote:
"PeterN" wrote in message
...
On 9/16/2015 11:40 AM, PAS wrote:
"PeterN" wrote in message
...
On 9/15/2015 4:07 PM, Tony Cooper wrote:
On Tue, 15 Sep 2015 15:10:38 -0400, PeterN

wrote:

On 9/15/2015 1:18 PM, Tony Cooper wrote:
On Tue, 15 Sep 2015 13:10:53 -0400, PeterN

wrote:

On 9/14/2015 10:13 PM, Savageduck wrote:
On 2015-09-15 01:58:11 +0000, PeterN

said:

On 9/13/2015 11:15 AM, Tony Cooper wrote:
On Sun, 13 Sep 2015 10:47:25 -0400, PeterN

wrote:

On 9/12/2015 12:37 AM, nospam wrote:
In article
,
Tony
Cooper
wrote:

You research toasters, too?

toasters are commodity products. there's not a whole
lot
of
research to
do.



there are differences between brands. Many do not do
English
muffins
well. Some are harder to clean and use than others.

We have a toaster, but it's stowed away in a cabinet and
seldom
used.
Toasting is done using a toaster oven, and the toaster
oven
is
capable
of cooking much more than just toast.

The last time I remember the toaster being brought out
was
a
Sunday
morning when my daughter, my son-in-law, my son, my
daughter-in-law,
and the grandchildren were over and a late breakfast was
served. To
keep up with toast demand, both appliances were used.


We haven't had a toaster in years. We use a convection
oven
that
can
function as a toaster.

Here I was thinking you were going to say, bread on a
stick
over
an open
fire.

Been there, done that.
Beats SOS though. There was one guy in my unit that
actually
liked
SOS.

While we didn't serve together, I was one who looked forward
to
SOS on
the menu at mess.


There's gotta be one in every unit. If you come from a small
town,
you'll be the one. Us city guys have different tastes.

I grew up in Indianapolis but lived in Chicago went I went off
to
Ft
Leonard Wood.

There are two types of SOS: one has chipped beef as the
"****"
and
the other has ground hamburger as the beef. I never like the
chipped
beef version because chipped beef is too salty for my taste.
The
cooks at Ft Leonard Wood used ground beef. The shingle, of
course, is
common to both and is a slice of toast.

I was stationed at Ft. Knox then Ft. Gordon. In both places it
was
over salted creamed chipped beef on toast.


It's difficult to prepare good food when your measuring cup is
a
55 gl
drum, but the Ft Leonard Wood cooks turned out some decent
meals.

Actually easier. Small mistakes don't drastically change the
taste.


My wife prepares what looks like SOS at times, but uses
sausage
(pork)
instead of beef and biscuits instead of toast. It's the
traditional
southern biscuits and gravy.

Big difference. What your wife makes sounds quite edible. On my
Southern trips I go out of my way to order grits, and white
gravy
with
biscuits and fried chicken. Though one of my favorite Southern
foods
is fried green tomatoes.


Do you also like
poutine? What about Haggis?

Neither were ever on the menu at Ft Leonard Wood. I've had
both,
but
wouldn't go out of my way to have either again. Gravy on
french
fries
is a common thing in the UK, but the cheese curd ingredient is
more
likely to be found in Quebec. I tried Haggis when I was in
Scotland,
and found it not disgusting but didn't ask for a recipe.

You Easterners, at least some of you, call red sauce as served
with
spaghetti "gravy" and put gravy on your pasta. It sounds bad
to
these
Midwestern ears, but doesn't taste bad.

You are also an Easterner. I have several meals in every
Eastern
state
and have never heard of tomato sauce being called gravy.
I have eaten enough meals with my Italian friends to know the
difference. I will usually not eat pasta in a diner, and like
it
al
dente.

I kow lots of our fellow Long Islanders who are of Italian
descent
that
refer to tomato sauce as gravy.

We must know different ones. I have friends who are native to
Venice,
Naples and Sardinia. I also have Sicilian friends, but not all of
them
like to be referred to as Italian. I have been in their homes,
and
have never heard tomato sauce for pasta called gravy.

Those whom I know that refer to tomato sauce as "gravy" are all
Americans of Italian heritage, no native Italians. Perhaps it's an
Americanized thing.


Gravy, to me, is either brown (meat based) or white (chicken
based).
It is not red or tomato based.

Same here. To me, tomato sauce and gravy are too different
things.
However, there are exceptions to that. My wife makes a Greek
dish
called Muscari that is like a beef stew and she adds a tomato
sauce
based gravy to it after it's cooked.


But it's not a pasta sauce.

True, but it is a gravy that is red and tomato-based.

Last night I was with two of my Italian friends. I specifically
asked
them about gravy on pasta. One of them, the guy from Venice,
winced,
but the other, said some of his other friends call red pasta sauce,
gravy. I had not heard about that before. The things one learns
around
here.

Not only was it "gravy" in Uncle Al's house, but pasta was always
served
at every Thanksgiving dinner. Same for some of my friends.


Long ago and far away I dated a girl who was of Sicilian descent. I
was invited to their house for Thanksgiving dinner. Several
Italian/Sicilian dishes were served. I was completely full when they
cleared the table and brought out a turkey and the traditional
American Thanksgiving dishes.

The one thing you don't do in a household like that is not eat the
hostess's cooking. Not a Sicilian hostess's cooking. Not with three
large and menacing brothers and the father sitting there who were not
at all happy that the girl was dating someone who wasn't Sicilian.


Very wise decision.


I had a few Italian girlfriends in my younger days. One of them had a
tough family. For Sunday dinner the had broken leg-of-lamb.

  #136  
Old September 18th 15, 01:07 AM posted to rec.photo.digital
Savageduck[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 15,569
Default A question for Applefans

On 2015-09-17 19:20:21 +0000, PeterN said:

On 9/17/2015 2:02 PM, Savageduck wrote:
On 2015-09-17 17:42:25 +0000, Tony Cooper said:

Long ago and far away I dated a girl who was of Sicilian descent. I
was invited to their house for Thanksgiving dinner. Several
Italian/Sicilian dishes were served. I was completely full when they
cleared the table and brought out a turkey and the traditional
American Thanksgiving dishes.

The one thing you don't do in a household like that is not eat the
hostess's cooking. Not a Sicilian hostess's cooking. Not with three
large and menacing brothers and the father sitting there who were not
at all happy that the girl was dating someone who wasn't Sicilian.


That reminds me of an officer and sergeant I worked with. They were a
classic odd pair. The sergeant was a tall skinny white guy and the
officer was a short Hispanic with, to put it kindly, a low center of
gravity. They went on a hunting vacation together to Montana, and the
sergeant couldn't wait to tell us what happened when they had a meal at
a rural eatery.
When asked the officer, who was the only very obviously Hispanic in the
place, ordered chicken fried steak and mashed potatoes and qualified his
order with, "...but hold the gravy". The response to that remark was for
every stetson crowned head in the place to whip around to stare at the
individual who had dared to sully their eating place's gravy.

He was then asked what he would like to drink, and he said, I'd like a
glass of Zinfandel. The waiter looked at him and said, "What did you
call me? You'll have a beer, or whiskey like everybody else and like it!"

It was one of those "a stranger walked into the bar" moments.



Y Our ending surprised me. I was expecting him to say: " I'll have a
sarsaparilla."


The poor guy was the butt of the joke for some time at work for both
the "hold the gravy" and the "Zinfandel" comments. He never lived it
down.

--
Regards,

Savageduck

  #137  
Old September 18th 15, 01:19 AM posted to rec.photo.digital
PeterN[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,254
Default A question for Applefans

On 9/17/2015 8:07 PM, Savageduck wrote:
On 2015-09-17 19:20:21 +0000, PeterN said:

On 9/17/2015 2:02 PM, Savageduck wrote:
On 2015-09-17 17:42:25 +0000, Tony Cooper
said:

Long ago and far away I dated a girl who was of Sicilian descent. I
was invited to their house for Thanksgiving dinner. Several
Italian/Sicilian dishes were served. I was completely full when they
cleared the table and brought out a turkey and the traditional
American Thanksgiving dishes.

The one thing you don't do in a household like that is not eat the
hostess's cooking. Not a Sicilian hostess's cooking. Not with three
large and menacing brothers and the father sitting there who were not
at all happy that the girl was dating someone who wasn't Sicilian.

That reminds me of an officer and sergeant I worked with. They were a
classic odd pair. The sergeant was a tall skinny white guy and the
officer was a short Hispanic with, to put it kindly, a low center of
gravity. They went on a hunting vacation together to Montana, and the
sergeant couldn't wait to tell us what happened when they had a meal at
a rural eatery.
When asked the officer, who was the only very obviously Hispanic in the
place, ordered chicken fried steak and mashed potatoes and qualified his
order with, "...but hold the gravy". The response to that remark was for
every stetson crowned head in the place to whip around to stare at the
individual who had dared to sully their eating place's gravy.

He was then asked what he would like to drink, and he said, I'd like a
glass of Zinfandel. The waiter looked at him and said, "What did you
call me? You'll have a beer, or whiskey like everybody else and like
it!"

It was one of those "a stranger walked into the bar" moments.



Y Our ending surprised me. I was expecting him to say: " I'll have a
sarsaparilla."


The poor guy was the butt of the joke for some time at work for both the
"hold the gravy" and the "Zinfandel" comments. He never lived it down.


**** happens.

PeterN
 




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