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New Foto Tip by Mark Alberhasy - A Perspective on Lenses



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 20th 06, 11:57 PM posted to alt.photography,aus.photo,rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.digital.slr-systems
Wayne J. Cosshall
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Posts: 826
Default New Foto Tip by Mark Alberhasy - A Perspective on Lenses

Hi All,

I've just posted the latest Foto Tip by Mark Alberhasky on DIMi:
http://www.dimagemaker.com/specials/fototips.php

It is on lenses and I can heartily endorse Mark's great advice. Mark is
a Nikon Mentor in the US.

Cheers,

Wayne

Wayne J. Cosshall
Publisher, The Digital ImageMaker, http://www.dimagemaker.com/
Blog http://www.digitalimagemakerworld.com/
Publisher, Experimental Digital Photography
http://www.experimentaldigitalphotography.com
Coordindinator of Studies, Multimedia and Photomedia, Australian Academy
of Design
Personal art site http://www.artinyourface.com/
  #2  
Old October 21st 06, 02:04 AM posted to alt.photography,aus.photo,rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.digital.slr-systems
Mr.T
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Posts: 889
Default New Foto Tip by Mark Alberhasy - A Perspective on Lenses


"Wayne J. Cosshall" wrote in message
u...
I've just posted the latest Foto Tip by Mark Alberhasky on DIMi:
http://www.dimagemaker.com/specials/fototips.php

It is on lenses and I can heartily endorse Mark's great advice. Mark is
a Nikon Mentor in the US.


I'm sure I'm not the only one who has been saying the same thing for years!

MrT.


  #3  
Old October 21st 06, 06:00 AM posted to alt.photography,aus.photo,rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.digital.slr-systems
Wayne J. Cosshall
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Posts: 826
Default New Foto Tip by Mark Alberhasy - A Perspective on Lenses

Mr.T wrote:
"Wayne J. Cosshall" wrote in message
u...
I've just posted the latest Foto Tip by Mark Alberhasky on DIMi:
http://www.dimagemaker.com/specials/fototips.php

It is on lenses and I can heartily endorse Mark's great advice. Mark is
a Nikon Mentor in the US.


I'm sure I'm not the only one who has been saying the same thing for years!

MrT.


No you are not. But of course with newcomers migrating to dSLRs all the
time it does need to be said again and again. It see it with my incoming
students all the time. Their idea of a fast lens is f4 and a really fast
one f2.8. It is the zoom mentality. Now nothing wrong with zooms, I love
my ones, but they are not the whole answer.

Cheers,

Wayne

--
Wayne J. Cosshall
Publisher, The Digital ImageMaker, http://www.dimagemaker.com/
Blog http://www.digitalimagemakerworld.com/
  #4  
Old October 21st 06, 03:08 PM posted to alt.photography,aus.photo,rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.digital.slr-systems
Herb Ludwig
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Posts: 10
Default New Foto Tip by Mark Alberhasy - A Perspective on Lenses


"Wayne J. Cosshall" wrote
No you are not. But of course with newcomers migrating to dSLRs all the
time it does need to be said again and again. It see it with my incoming
students all the time. Their idea of a fast lens is f4 and a really fast
one f2.8. It is the zoom mentality. Now nothing wrong with zooms, I love
my ones, but they are not the whole answer.



Not mentioned in Mark's article:
The need for a "fast" lens has become less pressing with today's DSLRs
providing for 4- stop ISO changes, e.g. from ISO 100 to 800, with virtually
no sharpness / noise penalties (and decent pictures even at 1600 or 3200),.
Get me right, I love to use my f1.4 prime lens and agree with the
"Cartier-Bresson" approach to learn to see through just one focal length. On
the other hand, Mark's "No more zoom in, zoom out. You've got to look for
the right subject and the right composition" is misleading. Any decent
photographer w/o a zoom will use his legs to get the right framing!
Cheers,
Hank


  #5  
Old October 21st 06, 03:30 PM posted to alt.photography,aus.photo,rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.digital.slr-systems
Mike Fields
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Posts: 235
Default New Foto Tip by Mark Alberhasy - A Perspective on Lenses


"Herb Ludwig" wrote in message
...

"Wayne J. Cosshall" wrote
No you are not. But of course with newcomers migrating to dSLRs all
the time it does need to be said again and again. It see it with my
incoming students all the time. Their idea of a fast lens is f4 and a
really fast one f2.8. It is the zoom mentality. Now nothing wrong
with zooms, I love my ones, but they are not the whole answer.



Not mentioned in Mark's article:
The need for a "fast" lens has become less pressing with today's DSLRs
providing for 4- stop ISO changes, e.g. from ISO 100 to 800, with
virtually no sharpness / noise penalties (and decent pictures even at
1600 or 3200),.
Get me right, I love to use my f1.4 prime lens and agree with the
"Cartier-Bresson" approach to learn to see through just one focal
length. On the other hand, Mark's "No more zoom in, zoom out. You've
got to look for the right subject and the right composition" is
misleading. Any decent photographer w/o a zoom will use his legs to
get the right framing!
Cheers,
Hank


Well, maybe not quite that simple -- a) the refs get a bit
upset if I am out in the middle of the soccer field during
the game to "get the right framing" and b) many times,
I want a different perspective between the foreground
subject and the background (mountains etc) - it takes
a different focal length to get the perspective right too
(yes, you still need to use your legs to get it right though)

mikey

  #6  
Old October 21st 06, 04:22 PM posted to alt.photography,aus.photo,rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.digital.slr-systems
Herb Ludwig
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Posts: 10
Default New Foto Tip by Mark Alberhasy - A Perspective on Lenses


"Mike Fields" [email protected] wrote
Well, maybe not quite that simple -- a) the refs get a bit
upset if I am out in the middle of the soccer field during
the game to "get the right framing" and b) many times,
I want a different perspective between the foreground
subject and the background (mountains etc) - it takes
a different focal length to get the perspective right too
(yes, you still need to use your legs to get it right though)



Yes, of course, there are a number of situations where the legs alone won't
do it.
Indoors, for instance, where a nasty wall may soon crowd one's effort to
step back-
Thanks for pointing out the importance of the foreground / background
perspective.
I use my Canon DSLR with 3 lenses (17-40 f4 Zoom, a 50 f1.4 Prime and a
70-200 f4 Zoom) and find that I take about 50% of my pictures with the 17-40
f4 lens, because I like its perspective on a 1.6 crop camera.
Cheers,
Hank


  #7  
Old October 21st 06, 04:33 PM posted to alt.photography,aus.photo,rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.digital.slr-systems
Mike Fields
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Posts: 235
Default New Foto Tip by Mark Alberhasy - A Perspective on Lenses


"Herb Ludwig" wrote in message
...

"Mike Fields" [email protected] wrote
Well, maybe not quite that simple -- a) the refs get a bit
upset if I am out in the middle of the soccer field during
the game to "get the right framing" and b) many times,
I want a different perspective between the foreground
subject and the background (mountains etc) - it takes
a different focal length to get the perspective right too
(yes, you still need to use your legs to get it right though)



Yes, of course, there are a number of situations where the legs alone
won't do it.
Indoors, for instance, where a nasty wall may soon crowd one's effort
to step back-
Thanks for pointing out the importance of the foreground / background
perspective.
I use my Canon DSLR with 3 lenses (17-40 f4 Zoom, a 50 f1.4 Prime and
a 70-200 f4 Zoom) and find that I take about 50% of my pictures with
the 17-40 f4 lens, because I like its perspective on a 1.6 crop
camera.
Cheers,
Hank


I have seen more people bitten with the foreground/background
thing. Out in the open country somewhere with a beautiful
mountain backdrop, they shoot the picture of someone from
up close with the wide angle then notice when they get home
the "magnificent mountain scenery" that was there when they
took the picture is just a couple of little bumps behind their
subject. Always the same comment "gee I don't understand,
the mountains looked so much bigger when we were there".
Step back even 10 feet, zoom in a bit to frame the subject
and voila - the mountains are there !! (unless you live in
Kansas, in which case, there is no hope for mountains .. )

mikey

  #8  
Old October 21st 06, 05:17 PM posted to alt.photography,aus.photo,rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.digital.slr-systems
Herb Ludwig
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Posts: 10
Default New Foto Tip by Mark Alberhasy - A Perspective on Lenses


"Mike Fields" [email protected] wrote:
I have seen more people bitten with the foreground/background
thing. Out in the open country somewhere with a beautiful
mountain backdrop, they shoot the picture of someone from
up close with the wide angle then notice when they get home
the "magnificent mountain scenery" that was there when they
took the picture is just a couple of little bumps behind their
subject. Always the same comment "gee I don't understand,
the mountains looked so much bigger when we were there".
Step back even 10 feet, zoom in a bit to frame the subject
and voila - the mountains are there !! (unless you live in
Kansas, in which case, there is no hope for mountains .. )



When one wants to enhance the size of distant mountains, the condensed
perspective of a tele lens is certainly the way to go. My personal taste for
landscape images goes rather in the opposite, wide-angle direction, where
the foreground subject is emphazised and the feeling of depth enhanced.
Therefore my preference and reliance on the 17-40 f4 Zoom.
Here is an example of the kind of image I strive to emulate:
http://www.pbase.com/paskuk/image/65952350

Cheers,
Hank


  #9  
Old October 21st 06, 09:18 PM posted to alt.photography,aus.photo,rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.digital.slr-systems
Tuli
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Posts: 14
Default New Foto Tip by Mark Alberhasy - A Perspective on Lenses

Herb Ludwig wrote:
"Mike Fields" [email protected] wrote:

I have seen more people bitten with the foreground/background
thing. Out in the open country somewhere with a beautiful
mountain backdrop, they shoot the picture of someone from
up close with the wide angle then notice when they get home
the "magnificent mountain scenery" that was there when they
took the picture is just a couple of little bumps behind their
subject. Always the same comment "gee I don't understand,
the mountains looked so much bigger when we were there".
Step back even 10 feet, zoom in a bit to frame the subject
and voila - the mountains are there !! (unless you live in
Kansas, in which case, there is no hope for mountains .. )




When one wants to enhance the size of distant mountains, the condensed
perspective of a tele lens is certainly the way to go. My personal taste for
landscape images goes rather in the opposite, wide-angle direction, where
the foreground subject is emphazised and the feeling of depth enhanced.
Therefore my preference and reliance on the 17-40 f4 Zoom.
Here is an example of the kind of image I strive to emulate:
http://www.pbase.com/paskuk/image/65952350


Beautiful photos!

Tuli
  #10  
Old October 22nd 06, 12:50 AM posted to alt.photography,aus.photo,rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.digital.slr-systems
Wayne J. Cosshall
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Posts: 826
Default New Foto Tip by Mark Alberhasy - A Perspective on Lenses

The thing is, yes we all know this but many others don't. It is easy to
forget that new people are coming to photography all the time as a new
hobby, or moving up in their attention to it. Things like stepping back
and using a longer lens has to be learned. And even using the feet
instead of the zoom has to be learned.

It is not automatic, especially now that the standard lens sold with
effectively all cameras is a zoom. For beginners, zooms give the
impression you can stay in one spot and get a range of results, which
you can. But learning that this is not always what you want to do needs
to be taught. It is one of the many things we have to teach students.

Cheers,

Wayne
--
Wayne J. Cosshall
Publisher, The Digital ImageMaker, http://www.dimagemaker.com/
Blog http://www.digitalimagemakerworld.com/
 




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