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Leaf Shutter questions for project camera



 
 
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  #51  
Old September 13th 04, 09:55 PM
Dan Fromm
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(Bob Monaghan) wrote in message ...
snip

you might look into reverse -T mount adapters for nikon and others, this
would make your setup universal, not just for Nikon, but canon and other

larger snip

bobm


Bob, Bob, Bob. Will you please tell us where the reverse T mount
adapters are hidden?

I just found the Minolta one I needed to use a Minolta Compact Bellows
on a Nikon. It is the third RT adapter I've seen in my life. The
other two were Nikon and Exakta, and I bought them both on principle.
The vendor who I got the Minolta one from also had a Canon, which I
didn't buy and probably should have. I found all three years apart in
different vendors' junk boxes at the same camera show. What will we
do when all of the camera shows have dried up and blown away? For
stuff like this eBay is a terrible source.

I still have vivid recollections of walking into Olden camera sometime
in the spring of '75 looking for an Exakta RT adapter so I could hang
a Steinheil macro lens in front of a Nikkormat. At first the clerk
didn't know what I was talking about, then muttered darkly about
non-existence, went into the back room, and emerged with used Novoflex
LEIEX and NIKLEI-K adapters, which did the necessary.

If I'd been feeling flush I'd have bought a MINLEI for my little
bellows and been done with searching, but $92.50 new at B&H struck me
as too much. Consider recommending Novoflex adapters instead of Ts,
they're much easier to find.

Cheers,

Dan
  #52  
Old September 15th 04, 03:38 AM
Bob Monaghan
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a few shift lenses in Tmounts (varioflex comes to mind IIRC, also nikon
mount), but not many. SOme very wide coverage 8mm and 12mm fisheyes
(Sigma), which have a unique look and cover more than 35mm too ;-)

It should be possible to rig up a bayonet mount like nikon if the lens
registration and rear clearance works out, but it may be possible to
produce a generic design too, simply using a spacer to adapt for the
different camera bayonet mounts?

Nikon sells the bayonet mount ring etc. that goes on the camera as a
separate part, and I suspect others do so for their camera bodies too?
I have one somewhere (was $2 at a camera show IIRC) for a project like
this, basically screw it onto a block with the right sized hole, and there
you are ;-) This may be simpler as I'm ignoring releases and locks and
levers and all that on other lens mounts esp. AF ;-0)

I have an article from 1960s Modern Photo, IIRC, in which they designed a
MF SLR, using a screw thread mounting and adapters for other shutters and
lenses with a bellows focusing mount. The Optika was a similarly versatile
"hackers" camera with 4 formats and lots of flexibility see
http://medfmt.8k.com/mf/optika.html ;p) for ideas ;-)

grins bobm
--
************************************************** *********************
* Robert Monaghan POB 752182 Southern Methodist Univ. Dallas Tx 75275 *
********************Standard Disclaimers Apply*************************
  #53  
Old September 15th 04, 03:38 AM
Bob Monaghan
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


a few shift lenses in Tmounts (varioflex comes to mind IIRC, also nikon
mount), but not many. SOme very wide coverage 8mm and 12mm fisheyes
(Sigma), which have a unique look and cover more than 35mm too ;-)

It should be possible to rig up a bayonet mount like nikon if the lens
registration and rear clearance works out, but it may be possible to
produce a generic design too, simply using a spacer to adapt for the
different camera bayonet mounts?

Nikon sells the bayonet mount ring etc. that goes on the camera as a
separate part, and I suspect others do so for their camera bodies too?
I have one somewhere (was $2 at a camera show IIRC) for a project like
this, basically screw it onto a block with the right sized hole, and there
you are ;-) This may be simpler as I'm ignoring releases and locks and
levers and all that on other lens mounts esp. AF ;-0)

I have an article from 1960s Modern Photo, IIRC, in which they designed a
MF SLR, using a screw thread mounting and adapters for other shutters and
lenses with a bellows focusing mount. The Optika was a similarly versatile
"hackers" camera with 4 formats and lots of flexibility see
http://medfmt.8k.com/mf/optika.html ;p) for ideas ;-)

grins bobm
--
************************************************** *********************
* Robert Monaghan POB 752182 Southern Methodist Univ. Dallas Tx 75275 *
********************Standard Disclaimers Apply*************************
  #54  
Old September 15th 04, 03:45 AM
Bob Monaghan
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


yes, I guess we all have our treasure troves of adapters and stuff, from
UV topcor to Exakta (that's an odd one, eh?;-) to nikon to hasselblad and
so on ;-) But you are right that you do have to check out those boxes
under the tables at camera shows to find these, and that new sales clerks
have no idea what you mean ;-) ;-)

there are more of these out there now, though, largely due to CNC and the
economics of larger production runs. The reverse T stuff is also easy to
make, as Gordon hinted with his use of extension tubes and a machinist to
turn out the required conversion ring(s). Or you could just use black
plumber's epoxy, extension tube, and rear lens cap cutout as needed for a
QND (quick 'N dirty) solution ;-)

I think the bigger problem now is that AF and digital have killed off the
third party lens and adapter potentials of modern digital or AF gear, on
purpose for a captive market. So those of us with the older manual gear
have lots more options - but only if, as you note, we can find the right
adapters or have them made ;-)

in the meantime, they do turn up on ebay now and again - often mislabeled
;-)

grins bobm
--
************************************************** *********************
* Robert Monaghan POB 752182 Southern Methodist Univ. Dallas Tx 75275 *
********************Standard Disclaimers Apply*************************
  #55  
Old September 15th 04, 03:45 AM
Bob Monaghan
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


yes, I guess we all have our treasure troves of adapters and stuff, from
UV topcor to Exakta (that's an odd one, eh?;-) to nikon to hasselblad and
so on ;-) But you are right that you do have to check out those boxes
under the tables at camera shows to find these, and that new sales clerks
have no idea what you mean ;-) ;-)

there are more of these out there now, though, largely due to CNC and the
economics of larger production runs. The reverse T stuff is also easy to
make, as Gordon hinted with his use of extension tubes and a machinist to
turn out the required conversion ring(s). Or you could just use black
plumber's epoxy, extension tube, and rear lens cap cutout as needed for a
QND (quick 'N dirty) solution ;-)

I think the bigger problem now is that AF and digital have killed off the
third party lens and adapter potentials of modern digital or AF gear, on
purpose for a captive market. So those of us with the older manual gear
have lots more options - but only if, as you note, we can find the right
adapters or have them made ;-)

in the meantime, they do turn up on ebay now and again - often mislabeled
;-)

grins bobm
--
************************************************** *********************
* Robert Monaghan POB 752182 Southern Methodist Univ. Dallas Tx 75275 *
********************Standard Disclaimers Apply*************************
  #56  
Old September 15th 04, 03:45 AM
Bob Monaghan
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


yes, I guess we all have our treasure troves of adapters and stuff, from
UV topcor to Exakta (that's an odd one, eh?;-) to nikon to hasselblad and
so on ;-) But you are right that you do have to check out those boxes
under the tables at camera shows to find these, and that new sales clerks
have no idea what you mean ;-) ;-)

there are more of these out there now, though, largely due to CNC and the
economics of larger production runs. The reverse T stuff is also easy to
make, as Gordon hinted with his use of extension tubes and a machinist to
turn out the required conversion ring(s). Or you could just use black
plumber's epoxy, extension tube, and rear lens cap cutout as needed for a
QND (quick 'N dirty) solution ;-)

I think the bigger problem now is that AF and digital have killed off the
third party lens and adapter potentials of modern digital or AF gear, on
purpose for a captive market. So those of us with the older manual gear
have lots more options - but only if, as you note, we can find the right
adapters or have them made ;-)

in the meantime, they do turn up on ebay now and again - often mislabeled
;-)

grins bobm
--
************************************************** *********************
* Robert Monaghan POB 752182 Southern Methodist Univ. Dallas Tx 75275 *
********************Standard Disclaimers Apply*************************
  #57  
Old September 15th 04, 07:49 PM
Gordon Moat
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Posts: n/a
Default

Bob Monaghan wrote:

a few shift lenses in Tmounts (varioflex comes to mind IIRC, also nikon
mount), but not many. SOme very wide coverage 8mm and 12mm fisheyes
(Sigma), which have a unique look and cover more than 35mm too ;-)


There is an 8 mm Nikkor fisheye lens at one of the local rental places.
Unfortunately, it requires mirror lock-up to mount. The rear of the lens goes
to far back, meaning that my type of solution would not work. Only more
retrofocus designs, and those without larger rear elements, would work. In
order to mount that type of fisheye lens, I would need a shutterless camera
body. I might do that, though it would be a limited use camera.


It should be possible to rig up a bayonet mount like nikon if the lens
registration and rear clearance works out, but it may be possible to
produce a generic design too, simply using a spacer to adapt for the
different camera bayonet mounts?


Okay, the advantage of the Nikon lenses is not because I have them, but
because the lens mount to film distance is so far. Only cameras with a
similar, or longer distance, would really allow room for a shutter and body.



Nikon sells the bayonet mount ring etc. that goes on the camera as a
separate part, and I suspect others do so for their camera bodies too?


Yes, and they are quite low priced.


I have one somewhere (was $2 at a camera show IIRC) for a project like
this, basically screw it onto a block with the right sized hole, and there
you are ;-) This may be simpler as I'm ignoring releases and locks and
levers and all that on other lens mounts esp. AF ;-0)


There is one pin release, though it should not be too tough to include. An
option would be a mount lock of some sort. Changing lenses should be as easy
as using a 35 mm body.



I have an article from 1960s Modern Photo, IIRC, in which they designed a
MF SLR, using a screw thread mounting and adapters for other shutters and
lenses with a bellows focusing mount. The Optika was a similarly versatile
"hackers" camera with 4 formats and lots of flexibility see
http://medfmt.8k.com/mf/optika.html ;p) for ideas ;-)


Weird camera. Very boxy design that does not look too comfortable to use hand
held. I hope to be substantially smaller in my completed project design.

Ciao!

Gordon Moat
A G Studio
http://www.allgstudio.com/gallery.html Updated!

  #58  
Old September 15th 04, 07:49 PM
Gordon Moat
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Bob Monaghan wrote:

a few shift lenses in Tmounts (varioflex comes to mind IIRC, also nikon
mount), but not many. SOme very wide coverage 8mm and 12mm fisheyes
(Sigma), which have a unique look and cover more than 35mm too ;-)


There is an 8 mm Nikkor fisheye lens at one of the local rental places.
Unfortunately, it requires mirror lock-up to mount. The rear of the lens goes
to far back, meaning that my type of solution would not work. Only more
retrofocus designs, and those without larger rear elements, would work. In
order to mount that type of fisheye lens, I would need a shutterless camera
body. I might do that, though it would be a limited use camera.


It should be possible to rig up a bayonet mount like nikon if the lens
registration and rear clearance works out, but it may be possible to
produce a generic design too, simply using a spacer to adapt for the
different camera bayonet mounts?


Okay, the advantage of the Nikon lenses is not because I have them, but
because the lens mount to film distance is so far. Only cameras with a
similar, or longer distance, would really allow room for a shutter and body.



Nikon sells the bayonet mount ring etc. that goes on the camera as a
separate part, and I suspect others do so for their camera bodies too?


Yes, and they are quite low priced.


I have one somewhere (was $2 at a camera show IIRC) for a project like
this, basically screw it onto a block with the right sized hole, and there
you are ;-) This may be simpler as I'm ignoring releases and locks and
levers and all that on other lens mounts esp. AF ;-0)


There is one pin release, though it should not be too tough to include. An
option would be a mount lock of some sort. Changing lenses should be as easy
as using a 35 mm body.



I have an article from 1960s Modern Photo, IIRC, in which they designed a
MF SLR, using a screw thread mounting and adapters for other shutters and
lenses with a bellows focusing mount. The Optika was a similarly versatile
"hackers" camera with 4 formats and lots of flexibility see
http://medfmt.8k.com/mf/optika.html ;p) for ideas ;-)


Weird camera. Very boxy design that does not look too comfortable to use hand
held. I hope to be substantially smaller in my completed project design.

Ciao!

Gordon Moat
A G Studio
http://www.allgstudio.com/gallery.html Updated!

  #59  
Old September 15th 04, 07:55 PM
Gordon Moat
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Bob Monaghan wrote:

yes, I guess we all have our treasure troves of adapters and stuff, from
UV topcor to Exakta (that's an odd one, eh?;-) to nikon to hasselblad and
so on ;-) But you are right that you do have to check out those boxes
under the tables at camera shows to find these, and that new sales clerks
have no idea what you mean ;-) ;-)

there are more of these out there now, though, largely due to CNC and the
economics of larger production runs. The reverse T stuff is also easy to
make, as Gordon hinted with his use of extension tubes and a machinist to
turn out the required conversion ring(s). Or you could just use black
plumber's epoxy, extension tube, and rear lens cap cutout as needed for a
QND (quick 'N dirty) solution ;-)


The first one would probably just be a measured, or maybe a DRO, machining
operation. If there was some desire for another one, then I could go CNC.
Actually, a good friend of mine is a CNC programmer and tool designer, and
he might be interested in greater volume production. Of course, then my
problem would be finding enough shutters.


I think the bigger problem now is that AF and digital have killed off the
third party lens and adapter potentials of modern digital or AF gear, on
purpose for a captive market. So those of us with the older manual gear
have lots more options - but only if, as you note, we can find the right
adapters or have them made ;-)


I think the idea that ALPA have done, with the ability to mount a digital
back, or a film back, is a much more elegant solution. Of course, they are
at a much higher expense level than what most of us would consider. I have
considered a metal block body concept like the ALPA 12, but that is much
more machining and planning, plus the extra cost of film backs.

Ciao!

Gordon Moat
A G Studio
http://www.allgstudio.com/gallery.html Updated!

  #60  
Old September 15th 04, 07:55 PM
Gordon Moat
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Bob Monaghan wrote:

yes, I guess we all have our treasure troves of adapters and stuff, from
UV topcor to Exakta (that's an odd one, eh?;-) to nikon to hasselblad and
so on ;-) But you are right that you do have to check out those boxes
under the tables at camera shows to find these, and that new sales clerks
have no idea what you mean ;-) ;-)

there are more of these out there now, though, largely due to CNC and the
economics of larger production runs. The reverse T stuff is also easy to
make, as Gordon hinted with his use of extension tubes and a machinist to
turn out the required conversion ring(s). Or you could just use black
plumber's epoxy, extension tube, and rear lens cap cutout as needed for a
QND (quick 'N dirty) solution ;-)


The first one would probably just be a measured, or maybe a DRO, machining
operation. If there was some desire for another one, then I could go CNC.
Actually, a good friend of mine is a CNC programmer and tool designer, and
he might be interested in greater volume production. Of course, then my
problem would be finding enough shutters.


I think the bigger problem now is that AF and digital have killed off the
third party lens and adapter potentials of modern digital or AF gear, on
purpose for a captive market. So those of us with the older manual gear
have lots more options - but only if, as you note, we can find the right
adapters or have them made ;-)


I think the idea that ALPA have done, with the ability to mount a digital
back, or a film back, is a much more elegant solution. Of course, they are
at a much higher expense level than what most of us would consider. I have
considered a metal block body concept like the ALPA 12, but that is much
more machining and planning, plus the extra cost of film backs.

Ciao!

Gordon Moat
A G Studio
http://www.allgstudio.com/gallery.html Updated!

 




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