A Photography forum. PhotoBanter.com

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » PhotoBanter.com forum » Digital Photography » Digital Photography
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Toner Vs Ink?



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old February 22nd 18, 08:59 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
Peter Jason
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 288
Default Toner Vs Ink?

I usually have my photos printed at a kiosk, but for the A4 larger
ones I use the office Fuji-Xerox laser color printer.

Is laser-toner photos longer lasting than the Kiosk-printed variety?

Peter


  #2  
Old February 22nd 18, 09:07 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
nospam
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 24,165
Default Toner Vs Ink?

In article , Peter Jason
wrote:

I usually have my photos printed at a kiosk, but for the A4 larger
ones I use the office Fuji-Xerox laser color printer.


that's a mistake.

Is laser-toner photos longer lasting than the Kiosk-printed variety?


it doesn't matter whether they do or not. fresh out of the printer,
they're already not as good as what can be had from even a mediocre
photo printer and a colour managed workflow.
  #3  
Old February 22nd 18, 10:50 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
Ken Hart[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 569
Default Toner Vs Ink?

On 02/22/2018 03:59 PM, Peter Jason wrote:
I usually have my photos printed at a kiosk, but for the A4 larger
ones I use the office Fuji-Xerox laser color printer.

Is laser-toner photos longer lasting than the Kiosk-printed variety?

Peter


Too many variables...

Toner is melted into the paper, and is generally water resistant. Inkjet
prints might run if they get damp, depending on the ink. And light-jet
photos are actual "old-school" photographs: light-sensitive photo paper
exposed to laser light and chemically processed. If they get wet, they
can usually be dried to their original appearance.

The big issue is the quality. Toner cannot make as fine a dot on the
paper, and toner pigments don't really mix. Inkjet printers can make a
smaller dot, and the different colors of ink mix together as they soak
into the paper. Photo-sensitive papers have all three colors already in
the paper, wanting to be exposed to the proper color light.

I've done toner printed photos and inkjet photos. Inkjet photos look
better, but toner photos are more rugged. And properly done
photo-sensitive paper prints beat them both.

--
Ken Hart

  #4  
Old February 23rd 18, 12:08 AM posted to rec.photo.digital
nospam
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 24,165
Default Toner Vs Ink?

In article , Ken Hart
wrote:

I usually have my photos printed at a kiosk, but for the A4 larger
ones I use the office Fuji-Xerox laser color printer.

Is laser-toner photos longer lasting than the Kiosk-printed variety?

Too many variables...


not at all.

ink jet versus laser printer. 1 variable.

presumably everything else is the same, he just chose a different
printer.

Toner is melted into the paper, and is generally water resistant. Inkjet
prints might run if they get damp, depending on the ink.


you must be using a very old inkjet printer and he didn't ask about
water resistance anyway.

And light-jet
photos are actual "old-school" photographs: light-sensitive photo paper
exposed to laser light and chemically processed.


one reason why they're not as good as inkjet prints.

If they get wet, they
can usually be dried to their original appearance.


so can inkjet prints.

The big issue is the quality. Toner cannot make as fine a dot on the
paper, and toner pigments don't really mix. Inkjet printers can make a
smaller dot, and the different colors of ink mix together as they soak
into the paper. Photo-sensitive papers have all three colors already in
the paper, wanting to be exposed to the proper color light.


the dots can't be seen at normal viewing distances so their size is not
an issue.

the dots also don't mix in the way you think they do. since they're
smaller than what the eye can resolve, the mixing is done in your eye,
not on the paper.

not surprisingly, if you look at photo paper under high magnification,
you can see film grains.

I've done toner printed photos and inkjet photos. Inkjet photos look
better, but toner photos are more rugged. And properly done
photo-sensitive paper prints beat them both.


then you did something wrong.

first of all, comparing 'properly done photo-sensitive paper prints'
with *improperly* made inkjet prints is bogus.

if you intentionally **** up one, then the other will win. no surprise
there. the correct comparison is with the best each can do.

modern ink jet photo printers have a wider gamut than photo paper and
laser printers, particularly those with more than 4 inks, and with a
properly calibrated workflow, will produce *better* results which last
longer than anything you can do with photo paper.

the problem with laser printers, what you are calling toner, is that
they have a much smaller gamut and cannot be properly calibrated,
resulting in lower quality prints.
  #5  
Old February 23rd 18, 03:31 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
Fred McKenzie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 214
Default Toner Vs Ink?

In article ,
Peter Jason wrote:

I usually have my photos printed at a kiosk, but for the A4 larger
ones I use the office Fuji-Xerox laser color printer.

Is laser-toner photos longer lasting than the Kiosk-printed variety?


Peter-

Maybe.

I assume your Kiosk print is inkjet. Some companies claim their inkjet
prints will last 100 years, but I have had some others fade in a few
months time.

If you are satisfied with the appearance of your laser prints, you still
have to worry about them sticking to anything they touch. Mounting in a
frame, you need to use a separator to keep them from sticking to the
glass. They may fade over time, but I do not know how fast.

In either case, the different primary colors may fade at different
rates, resulting in color shift over time.

You can only find out by waiting. Do not erase your computer image!

Fred
  #6  
Old February 23rd 18, 10:28 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
Neil[_9_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 521
Default Toner Vs Ink?

On 2/22/2018 3:59 PM, Peter Jason wrote:
I usually have my photos printed at a kiosk, but for the A4 larger
ones I use the office Fuji-Xerox laser color printer.

Is laser-toner photos longer lasting than the Kiosk-printed variety?

Peter


There is no single answer to this question, and as Ken pointed out, it
may be appropriate to consider film-based prints, too, since they are
excellent quality.

Laser printers are not all of the same quality, nor do they use the same
toner, so image quality and longevity will vary depending on your choice.

Inkjets tend to be more economical for the same or higher image quality
that consumer-grade lasers are capable of. They also are capable of much
larger print sizes than laser or film printers.

Just a few things to consider...

--
best regards,

Neil
  #7  
Old February 23rd 18, 11:02 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
Eric Stevens
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 13,611
Default Toner Vs Ink?

On Fri, 23 Feb 2018 10:31:20 -0500, Fred McKenzie
wrote:

In article ,
Peter Jason wrote:

I usually have my photos printed at a kiosk, but for the A4 larger
ones I use the office Fuji-Xerox laser color printer.

Is laser-toner photos longer lasting than the Kiosk-printed variety?


Peter-

Maybe.

I assume your Kiosk print is inkjet. Some companies claim their inkjet
prints will last 100 years, but I have had some others fade in a few
months time.


Depends upon the printer and the ink they use. In my experience there
are large variations but durability seems to be improving.

If you are satisfied with the appearance of your laser prints, you still
have to worry about them sticking to anything they touch. Mounting in a
frame, you need to use a separator to keep them from sticking to the
glass. They may fade over time, but I do not know how fast.

In either case, the different primary colors may fade at different
rates, resulting in color shift over time.

You can only find out by waiting. Do not erase your computer image!

Fred

--

Regards,

Eric Stevens
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
warm toner? seog In The Darkroom 5 January 3rd 06 02:49 PM
warm toner? NER In The Darkroom 1 December 29th 05 03:43 PM
Kodak Poly-Toner Bernie In The Darkroom 1 October 22nd 05 06:48 PM
Berg selenium toner Sam G In The Darkroom 2 February 17th 05 01:23 PM
new vanadium toner Wilco Oelen In The Darkroom 8 June 27th 04 12:52 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 12:07 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2022 PhotoBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.