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-   -   The case for "Kaizen", following Fujifilm's Example (http://www.photobanter.com/showthread.php?t=131088)

Savageduck[_3_] January 13th 18 01:34 AM

The case for "Kaizen", following Fujifilm's Example
 
It has been three years since I made my move from Nikon to Fujifilm, and I
have become an unashamed fan. One of the reasons has been the Fujifilm
philosophy of “Kaizen”, or providing firmware updates/upgrades to improve
existing, and even discontinued models. I have benefitted from several
firmware updates/upgrades to my X-E2, and X-T2 which seemed to perform like
new cameras.

Three years after buying my first X-Series camera I now own three, the X-E2,
X-T2, and an X-E3, along with 6 Fujinon lenses, and I couldn’t be happier.
Though there are at least three other lenses I have my eye on.
G.A.S. is a terrible afliction. ;-)

I would add that I haven’t used my D300S for over a year now, and the only
piece of my Nikon kit I use today is my Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 with a
Nikon-to-Fujifilm adaptor.

Now there is this article from Fstoppers which supports my remarks above, and
asks why other camera manufacturers do not follow a similar philosophy, but
choose to release new models at higher prices, when a firmware update would
have done the same thing.

https://fstoppers.com/originals/why-...ers-should-be-
more-fuji-210834

--

Regards,
Savageduck


Savageduck[_3_] January 13th 18 01:39 AM

The case for "Kaizen", following Fujifilm's Example
 
On Jan 12, 2018, Savageduck wrote
(in iganews.com):

It has been three years since I made my move from Nikon to Fujifilm, and I
have become an unashamed fan. One of the reasons has been the Fujifilm
philosophy of “Kaizen”, or providing firmware updates/upgrades to improve
existing, and even discontinued models. I have benefitted from several
firmware updates/upgrades to my X-E2, and X-T2 which seemed to perform like
new cameras.

Three years after buying my first X-Series camera I now own three, the X-E2,
X-T2, and an X-E3, along with 6 Fujinon lenses, and I couldn’t be happier.
Though there are at least three other lenses I have my eye on.
G.A.S. is a terrible afliction. ;-)

I would add that I haven’t used my D300S for over a year now, and the only
piece of my Nikon kit I use today is my Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 with a
Nikon-to-Fujifilm adaptor.

Now there is this article from Fstoppers which supports my remarks above, and
asks why other camera manufacturers do not follow a similar philosophy, but
choose to release new models at higher prices, when a firmware update would
have done the same thing.

https://fstoppers.com/originals/why-other-camera-manufacturers-should-be-more-fuji-210834


For some reason that link broke even though I used delimiters.

So...https://tinyurl.com/y7tavwga

--

Regards,
Savageduck


nospam January 13th 18 01:42 AM

The case for "Kaizen", following Fujifilm's Example
 
In article .com,
Savageduck wrote:

Now there is this article from Fstoppers which supports my remarks above,
and
asks why other camera manufacturers do not follow a similar philosophy, but
choose to release new models at higher prices, when a firmware update would
have done the same thing.


https://fstoppers.com/originals/why-...s-should-be-mo
re-fuji-210834


For some reason that link broke even though I used delimiters.


it works fine

Alan Browne[_2_] January 13th 18 02:46 PM

The case for "Kaizen", following Fujifilm's Example
 
On 2018-01-12 19:39, Savageduck wrote:
On Jan 12, 2018, Savageduck wrote
(in iganews.com):

It has been three years since I made my move from Nikon to Fujifilm, and I
have become an unashamed fan. One of the reasons has been the Fujifilm
philosophy of “Kaizen”, or providing firmware updates/upgrades to improve
existing, and even discontinued models. I have benefitted from several
firmware updates/upgrades to my X-E2, and X-T2 which seemed to perform like
new cameras.

Three years after buying my first X-Series camera I now own three, the X-E2,
X-T2, and an X-E3, along with 6 Fujinon lenses, and I couldn’t be happier.
Though there are at least three other lenses I have my eye on.
G.A.S. is a terrible afliction. ;-)

I would add that I haven’t used my D300S for over a year now, and the only
piece of my Nikon kit I use today is my Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 with a
Nikon-to-Fujifilm adaptor.

Now there is this article from Fstoppers which supports my remarks above, and
asks why other camera manufacturers do not follow a similar philosophy, but
choose to release new models at higher prices, when a firmware update would
have done the same thing.

https://fstoppers.com/originals/why-other-camera-manufacturers-should-be-more-fuji-210834


For some reason that link broke even though I used delimiters.


The "broken" original worked fine and the one above is "restored" and
works. Good news readers usually handle broken links.

--
“When it is all said and done, there are approximately 94 million
full-time workers in private industry paying taxes to support 102
million non-workers and 21 million government workers.
In what world does this represent a strong job market?”
..Jim Quinn

Alan Browne[_2_] January 13th 18 02:47 PM

The case for "Kaizen", following Fujifilm's Example
 
On 2018-01-12 19:34, Savageduck wrote:
It has been three years since I made my move from Nikon to Fujifilm, and I
have become an unashamed fan. One of the reasons has been the Fujifilm
philosophy of “Kaizen”, or providing firmware updates/upgrades to improve
existing, and even discontinued models. I have benefitted from several
firmware updates/upgrades to my X-E2, and X-T2 which seemed to perform like
new cameras.

Three years after buying my first X-Series camera I now own three, the X-E2,
X-T2, and an X-E3, along with 6 Fujinon lenses, and I couldn’t be happier.
Though there are at least three other lenses I have my eye on.
G.A.S. is a terrible afliction. ;-)

I would add that I haven’t used my D300S for over a year now, and the only
piece of my Nikon kit I use today is my Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 with a
Nikon-to-Fujifilm adaptor.

Now there is this article from Fstoppers which supports my remarks above, and
asks why other camera manufacturers do not follow a similar philosophy, but
choose to release new models at higher prices, when a firmware update would
have done the same thing.

https://fstoppers.com/originals/why-...ers-should-be-
more-fuji-210834


It's a fine idea and late in coming to cameras. That said, I did F/W
updates to at least one Sony DSLR at some point to address a focus
issue. But they haven't pushed out product improvements (new features)
that way to my knowledge.

--
“When it is all said and done, there are approximately 94 million
full-time workers in private industry paying taxes to support 102
million non-workers and 21 million government workers.
In what world does this represent a strong job market?”
..Jim Quinn

Alan Browne January 13th 18 05:37 PM

The case for "Kaizen", following Fujifilm's Example
 
On 2018.01.13 02:17, RichA wrote:

The problem with business today is the idea that in order to succeed,
you have to have continued growth, meaning you have to make more and
more money, any way you can. We've seen businesses kill themselves
with that attitude, by turning out inferior products or asking users
to pay more and more for essentially the same thing.



The notion that businesses must grow is in part the recycling of profits
toward that growth. Compounding the original investment is the path to
high revenue and return over time.

Unfortunately, with some exceptions, many North American companies are
short term profit growth driven. This takes the eye off the long term.
Further focusing management bonuses on short term objectives and stock
price growth is not exactly beneficial to product development and
quality over time.

PeterN[_7_] January 14th 18 11:34 PM

The case for "Kaizen", following Fujifilm's Example
 
On 1/13/2018 11:37 AM, Alan Browne wrote:
On 2018.01.13 02:17, RichA wrote:

The problem with business today is the idea that in order to succeed,
you have to have continued growth, meaning you have to make more and
more money, any way you can.* We've seen businesses kill themselves
with that attitude, by turning out inferior products or asking users
to pay more and more for essentially the same thing.



The notion that businesses must grow is in part the recycling of profits
toward that growth.* Compounding the original investment is the path to
high revenue and return over time.

Unfortunately, with some exceptions, many North American companies are
short term profit growth driven.* This takes the eye off the long term.
*Further focusing management bonuses on short term objectives and stock
price growth is not exactly beneficial to product development and
quality over time.


That short sighted notion has been around for many years, and is not
likely to go away soon.
e.g. While in college I applied for a job as a salesman. My interview
went something like this:

Sales-manager 'sell me this pencil."

Me: Not if you don't need the pencil."

Sales-manager: " Can you start tomorrow?"


--
PeterN

Alan Browne[_2_] January 15th 18 01:19 AM

The case for "Kaizen", following Fujifilm's Example
 
On 2018-01-14 17:34, PeterN wrote:
On 1/13/2018 11:37 AM, Alan Browne wrote:
On 2018.01.13 02:17, RichA wrote:

The problem with business today is the idea that in order to succeed,
you have to have continued growth, meaning you have to make more and
more money, any way you can.* We've seen businesses kill themselves
with that attitude, by turning out inferior products or asking users
to pay more and more for essentially the same thing.



The notion that businesses must grow is in part the recycling of
profits toward that growth.* Compounding the original investment is
the path to high revenue and return over time.

Unfortunately, with some exceptions, many North American companies are
short term profit growth driven.* This takes the eye off the long
term. **Further focusing management bonuses on short term objectives
and stock price growth is not exactly beneficial to product
development and quality over time.


That short sighted notion has been around for many years, and is not
likely to go away soon.
e.g. While in college I applied for a job as a salesman. My interview
went something like this:

Sales-manager 'sell me this pencil."

Me: Not if you don't need the pencil."

Sales-manager: " Can you start tomorrow?"


Wrong answer.

Right answer: "Sir, I see you have one of our fine pencils. So, would
you like a special offer for our deluxe sharpener and eraser?"

That gets you the job.

--
“When it is all said and done, there are approximately 94 million
full-time workers in private industry paying taxes to support 102
million non-workers and 21 million government workers.
In what world does this represent a strong job market?”
..Jim Quinn

PeterN[_7_] January 16th 18 12:41 AM

The case for "Kaizen", following Fujifilm's Example
 
On 1/14/2018 7:19 PM, Alan Browne wrote:
On 2018-01-14 17:34, PeterN wrote:
On 1/13/2018 11:37 AM, Alan Browne wrote:
On 2018.01.13 02:17, RichA wrote:

The problem with business today is the idea that in order to succeed,
you have to have continued growth, meaning you have to make more and
more money, any way you can.* We've seen businesses kill themselves
with that attitude, by turning out inferior products or asking users
to pay more and more for essentially the same thing.


The notion that businesses must grow is in part the recycling of
profits toward that growth.* Compounding the original investment is
the path to high revenue and return over time.

Unfortunately, with some exceptions, many North American companies
are short term profit growth driven.* This takes the eye off the long
term. **Further focusing management bonuses on short term objectives
and stock price growth is not exactly beneficial to product
development and quality over time.


That short sighted notion has been around for many years, and is not
likely to go away soon.
e.g. While in college I applied for a job as a salesman. My interview
went something like this:

Sales-manager 'sell me this pencil."

Me: Not if you don't need the pencil."

Sales-manager: " Can you start tomorrow?"


Wrong answer.

Right answer:** "Sir, I see you have one of our fine pencils.* So, would
you like a special offer for our deluxe sharpener and eraser?"

That gets you the job.


You may have a better answer. My answer worked.

--
PeterN

Savageduck[_3_] January 16th 18 01:30 AM

The case for "Kaizen", following Fujifilm's Example
 
On Jan 15, 2018, PeterN wrote
(in article ):

On 1/14/2018 7:19 PM, Alan Browne wrote:
On 2018-01-14 17:34, PeterN wrote:
On 1/13/2018 11:37 AM, Alan Browne wrote:
On 2018.01.13 02:17, RichA wrote:

The problem with business today is the idea that in order to succeed,
you have to have continued growth, meaning you have to make more and
more money, any way you can. We've seen businesses kill themselves
with that attitude, by turning out inferior products or asking users
to pay more and more for essentially the same thing.


The notion that businesses must grow is in part the recycling of
profits toward that growth. Compounding the original investment is
the path to high revenue and return over time.

Unfortunately, with some exceptions, many North American companies
are short term profit growth driven. This takes the eye off the long
term. Further focusing management bonuses on short term objectives
and stock price growth is not exactly beneficial to product
development and quality over time.

That short sighted notion has been around for many years, and is not
likely to go away soon.
e.g. While in college I applied for a job as a salesman. My interview
went something like this:

Sales-manager 'sell me this pencil."

Me: Not if you don't need the pencil."

Sales-manager: " Can you start tomorrow?"


Wrong answer.

Right answer: "Sir, I see you have one of our fine pencils. So, would
you like a special offer for our deluxe sharpener and eraser?"

That gets you the job.


You may have a better answer. My answer worked.


In the context of this thread your answer should have been, “With that
pencil, all you need is the firmware update."

--

Regards,
Savageduck



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